🎨 Creative 101 freshly-picked fantasy flowers and related seeds

KnockingBox

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Looking at random treasure generator tables for D&D-like dungeoncrawls, with their intricate lists of gem cuts and clothing materials and furniture styles, has me thinking about botany, floral language, and magical or at least remarkable flowers. I'm making some notes for a location-based adventure setting where flowers are a uniquely valuable treasure worth risking your life for. What are some mythic, magical, dangerous, or just fascinating traits that a flower might have? What fascinating things could characters in a fantasy setting do with the symbolism and language of flowers, or the physical practice of gardening and cultivation itself? (Not to mention the trouble they could get into during a tulip craze...)
 

Terhali

Weird and pissed off
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Many carnivorous plants in our world have the power of movement. They have "jaws" that snap closed or "arms" that curl around a victim. In a fantastic setting, large versions of such plants have mouths, complete with teeth capable of reaching out to snatch a human-sized victim. Vines enmesh prey. Tree branches push victims into the hungry maw of a trunk.

Robert Silverburg's Majipoor books had delicate telepathic plants that would wither if people argued in their presence. Bladder trees grew bladders filled with lighter-than-air gas, tethered to the ground by slender, rope-like trunks.

Flowers in a magical land may create hypnotic patterns, but why? Perhaps they are also carnivorous, and when an undisturbed victim dies of thirst, its body provides nutrients for the flower's seeds. Or perhaps it lures pollinators. Such flowers could be desirable for assassination or as a sort of recreational drug.

Here's a picture of a barnacle tree.
 

Count Dorku

Renegade librarian
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Druidic Flower Code
Many subcultures develop systems for conveying messages subtly: the "hobo sign", for example. Wandering druids do something similar, growing specific patterns of flowers at trail junctions to warn of various dangerous wildlife or other, stranger problems: a triangular pattern with a carnivorous plant in the middle, for example, conveys that there is a nest of aberrations nearby, with the flowers in the corners conveying the species.
 

Malkavian87

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Wander Herb: Small unassuming herb. But everyone who steps on it completely loses their sense of direction for hours. They'll wander around lost until it wears off. (It's a thing in real world European folklore.)
 

g33k

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I note that there was quite a bit of this implicit (and some explicit) in Nobilis 2e.

I don't know if it was present in 1e (or continued in 3e), however.
 

MoonHunter

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Originally Posted Here, I have a couple Flora there that I really liked.

The Scarlet Call
When blood has been shed in anger or waste, The Scarlett Call will be there.

Full Description
The spores that become Scarlett Call can lay dormant for ages. They only sprout when the soil they are in is disturbed and hemogloblin (or some other blood elements) are mixed in. Once they do sprout, they sprout with a vengeance.

These plants are quick growing, but not supernaturally quick despite the bardic tales. The green vines remain low to the ground. The flowers are small, bright, and scarlet. In fact, the low vines are runners, inserting new tap roots into the ground every foot or so. It creates a lattice of strong vines that makes going in an “infected” field difficult. The low vines are vile as they are slightly sharp (with tiny spines) and slightly sticky (some people feel them as an itchy sting, being allergic to them) The plants are not edible by any beast except when the plant is old and after has released a cloud of spores to the wind. The Wound, what a field of Scarlett Call is called, continues to prosper for a time based on the amount of blood in the soil, a few months if it is just a bloody predator kill to years in the case of a battlefield.

Additional Information
Also known as The Scarlett's Call (Scarlett is a proper noun), Blood Tangle, Tryms Mark (Trym being a god of Battle), Hunter’s Eye (so called because they are used to spot where predators have made kills), Krell’s Mark (Krell being an Evil Spirit whos worship has to deal with blood), Widow’s Tears, and Earth’s Wounds.

GM Notes:
The presence of Scarlett Call denotes the presence of battles, executions, evil rituals, or where local hunters (or predators) have killed and gutted animals without care. The size of The Wound is telling. It is the way for a GM to show a bit of history or mystery by making "blood was here" known.
 
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SunlessNick

Mildly Darkened One
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Stoneweed is so called for the grey-green colour of its leaves. It flourishes in areas blighted by negative energy where other plantlife withers, though you can find it in other areas if you look hard enough. It's an ingredient for necromancy and counter-necromancy, and chewing it is reputed to provide a small protection against the draining effects of undead creatures.
 

MoonHunter

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7) Blight Corn

Context: The Dark Lord won. Humanity and the Angels lost the day. The Shroud settled over the world, trapping it in perpetual twilight and marking it as the Demon's territory - a beachhead in the fight for the Eternal City. That fight will happen someday when the stars are aligned. Until then, Humanity lives under The Shroud. (This is the basis of several settings for me.)

Humanity is hard-pressed to survive under The Shroud. Nothing grows well. Yet from the Ministers of The Dark Lord came a gift from The Benevolent Leader: Blight Corn.

It is a yellowish and brownish corn, in a rustish colored husk on a mottled green and rust colored stalk. It is not a very sweet corn, but tasty enough. The cobs make good feed. The husks are good fiber plants. Kernals dry well.

It is a Corn that develops without strong sunlight. It grows strong and fast. The trick is in the planting. A bit of blood goes with the seed stock in the rows. It is "the sealing of the common magic spell" that makes it grow. Thus Blight Corn is keeping the People of the South alive.

1+1/.29
 
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SandwormPhish

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Wizard's Staff

A thaumovoric blossom that can only bloom in high magical concentrations. Wizard's Staff plants are considered a highly valuable reagent in many magical rituals due to their versatility. The plant soaks in ambient magic. Depending on the specific variety of Wizard's Staff this magic will be concentrated into seeds or flowers. This is done with the attention of attracting creatures that feast on magical energy in order to trick them into either consuming the magic laden nectar within the flower and being coated in pollen as a result, or devouring the seeds which don't actually need the magic to successfully flower and are thus eventually passed and deposited in a new area. The nectar and seeds of the plant are considered strong spell components due to how easily they can be aligned with a spell of choice by simply using related magic near them, while the roots and leaves are highly absorbent towards magical energy and are thus valued in the manufacture of lightweight magic resistant armor.
 
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