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3:16 this weekend . . .

philreed

Unwanted Commentator
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I'm hitting BGG Con (my wife and I are driving to Dallas this morning so that we can go to the King Tut exhibit before the show) so it's only appropriate that a boardgame convention is going to be my first chance to play 3:16.

Will and I were talking about the game yesterday in the office and I mentioned that if we had a range map large enough then we could use my collection of clone trooper/stormtrooper Mighty Muggs (I've got all five different designs because I'm a sucker for clone troopers and stormtroopers). Unfortunately, there's no time to get a range map scaled for 6" figures -- and we wouldn't have any appropriate enemy figures -- so instead I'll probably just drag along a bunch of action figures. Not quite as cool, though.

Does anyone have any advice for the game? Anything we should watch for when we sit down to play? Will has already played (a few months ago at PAX, I think) but the rest of us will be new to the game (I've read the book a few times, but haven't even created a character, so most of us are coming into this not sure what to expect).
 

Gregor Hutton

Causing Carnage
Hi Phil!

I ran it 4 times at a con a few weeks ago and it went pretty well for me.

My advice from there is to just make characters up at the start following the book. Going round everyone getting them to read out their Name and Reputation and Kills So Far gets everyone aware of the "squad".

Then once everone has their Rank and Gear I did a bit of role-playing with them on the ship, in their quarters, that kind of thing just to get everyone "in character" -- here I find dickish or sympathetic NPC Troopers can get made on the fly. I was asking for NFA checks to see if they had all their equipment right for parade, etc. before having some idiot/heroic officer briefing them on the planet. (My briefings are usual, deliberately, useless and un-informative with coloured circles handed out as maps to the Sergeants.)

Then just get them on the drop ship (NFA not to puke on descent!) and throw them into the first encounter straight away. The key then is getting the players to jaw back and forth between encounters and have your NPCs ask them for progress updates and send them objectives.

From a con-play point of view, I found that it's nice to have two missions in a slot if you can. So don't worry about hammering through the first mission with big encounters (or only using 4 x number of players in Threat) so that everyone gets to see development Between Missions and then have a tougher second mission (with the full 5 x number of players in Threat and a high AA, go on, pick 10).

But, generally, it's linking the fiction to the mechanics. If you run it like the Roughriders you'll be fine I think.
 

mobuttu

Maqui ed
Validated User
Does anyone have any advice for the game? Anything we should watch for when we sit down to play? Will has already played (a few months ago at PAX, I think) but the rest of us will be new to the game (I've read the book a few times, but haven't even created a character, so most of us are coming into this not sure what to expect).
Some advice I can think of:

0) Play on an soundproof place (at least as far as you can from other game tables). It's a game that tend to generate some shouting ;D
1) Prepare in advance the planets. Don't improvise too much.
2) For each planet think of a mission, but be flexible enough to adapt to players expectations. (ex. If they thing the aliens are in caves; fight them in caves regardless of you have though before).
3) Use the Range board (25 mm figures are enough). They produce game immersion with that tactical felling.
4) Use alien powers as soon as you can.
5) Don't let line-of-command conflicts stop your game. Resolve them with an NFA roll. Keep the pace going on and on...

Hope this helps.
 

Mister Gone

Six Monkey Slap-Slap
Validated User
I love Mighty Muggs, and I own far far too many with no proper way currently of displaying them. This thread also reminds me I need to get my hands on 3:16 as I had planned ever since reading the demo.
 

philreed

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I love Mighty Muggs, and I own far far too many with no proper way currently of displaying them. This thread also reminds me I need to get my hands on 3:16 as I had planned ever since reading the demo.
I refuse to buy any Muggs that are not clone troopers/stormtroopers. It's a safety thing to protect myself from . . . myself.

I'm taking about 10 stormtrooper action figures (including variants like TIE Pilot, sand, and a Dark Trooper), a baggie of weapons (we need a wide selection of guns), and a ton of droids to fight. Next I need to enlarge a range map to the right size (11x17 should work) and then I'm all set.
 

philreed

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0) Play on an soundproof place (at least as far as you can from other game tables). It's a game that tend to generate some shouting ;D
That may be tough to arrange at this con. Fortunately, we can be pretty loud players so I'm not worried about the noise level.



1) Prepare in advance the planets. Don't improvise too much.
Really? That goes against what I was intending to do. How much preparation do you mean? Written details or just a general overview?


3) Use the Range board (25 mm figures are enough). They produce game immersion with that tactical felling.
That's the plan (using the range map), but we're gonna use action figures instead of minis.

Thanks for the advice.
 

Gregor Hutton

Causing Carnage
Oh, I do pretty much zero preparation when running it. I wait to see what I get for the planet choices and see what that sparks off.

At IndieCon I had two of the four games "planned" in that I knew one would be like Endor with Ewoks, and the other would be like Iraq with Corrupt Troopers. But I didn't really have any things fixed in stone at all, or thought about too much beforehand.

The other two games were completely un-planned.

If you are happy with playing on the fly the game supports that very well. Equally, if you want to prep before the game it will allow you to do that too. I think it's just a preference, really.
 

mobuttu

Maqui ed
Validated User
Oh, I do pretty much zero preparation when running it. I wait to see what I get for the planet choices and see what that sparks off.

At IndieCon I had two of the four games "planned" in that I knew one would be like Endor with Ewoks, and the other would be like Iraq with Corrupt Troopers. But I didn't really have any things fixed in stone at all, or thought about too much beforehand.

The other two games were completely un-planned.

If you are happy with playing on the fly the game supports that very well. Equally, if you want to prep before the game it will allow you to do that too. I think it's just a preference, really.
Ok. Gregor is the expert here (I take my hat off to him), but I've seen that a little prep work doesn't hurt, especially to push the plot foward in case your players are lost. Don't do detailed work:

- Planet environment.
- Alien type, AA and Alien power.
- Broad mission (rescue somebody, retrieve some Mcguffin, Exploration, Install radar bases, etc.).
- Information you'll give in the briefing.
- Mission milestons.

All the other details can be left open.
 

Paul B

Plain English or Death
Validated User
I do absolutely zero prep before play. It's one of the draws of the game for me, actually. The only thing I have written down is the journal of rolls I've made (so I know I've used up those numbers on the table!) and some very brief continuity notes so I can reincorporate old details.

I think we've gone through...7 or 8 planets so far, and the zero-prep approach has been totally fine. Now that we have a player with a Captain (see the other 3:16 thread), it's even easier.

p.
 
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