#3: Member Roles

spshu

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Validated User
#2
Colleges don't expect clubs to have some sort of board of director?

Perhaps a more creative title then librarian might intice the right person to take that position.

I think that a vice-president should be a fill in or replacement for any other officer not just the president if they are not focus group leaders. I agree that a vice-president would be a good title for a focus group leader.
 

Kid Twist

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#3
Colleges don't expect clubs to have some sort of board of director?
Not the colleges I've seen. I don't think a board of directors would be appropriate, either; the advisor to the organization serves as the main contact point for the group, but the closest thing that a university would have to a board of directors would be the student activities office, who makes sure all of the campus organizations are doing what they're supposed to. Therefore, a board would be redundant.


Perhaps a more creative title then librarian might intice the right person to take that position.
Well, yes, that's a possibility. I'm just listing the positions as they're usually described in campus literature and documents. I know one group had a Dictator For Life and a Minister of Propaganda. The point isn't necessarily the title, but the job that needs to be done.


I think that a vice-president should be a fill in or replacement for any other officer not just the president if they are not focus group leaders. I agree that a vice-president would be a good title for a focus group leader.
That's a possibility. If you're looking at it from a business POV, then that's a VP would usually function like a focus group leader. Remember, though, that a college organization isn't a business, and it can suffer a lot if people start treating it like one.
 

mxyzplk

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#4
I helped found the FORGE, a Memphis, TN-based gmaing group. Not university affiliated, but there you go. Anyway, we had four officers -

Hammer (President) - as you note, the faceman

Warlord (VP/game coordinator) - gaming is all about scheduling events, arranging for GMs, etc. The Warlord took care of all that.

Cutpurse (treasurer) - as you describe them

Oracle (secretary) - keeping the Web page etc. updated is a big part of this nowadays.

We discussed a sergeant-at-arms - someone who basically would keep order and ensure site rules were followed at gaming events - but we never needed it.

The Warlord was one of the positions that really had the most "work" to it, so I'd suggest gaming clubs think about that role...
 

C.W.Richeson

RPG Reviewer
RPGnet Member
#5
Another great column, Alec, keep it up! :)

Other than standoffishness of members, I've found a poorly maintained webpage to be the greatest barrier to interacting with (and joining) college gaming societies. I think I would have joined one a few years ago but for the complete lack of ability to interact with the members and see what they were up to (other than attending a physical meeting).
 

Kid Twist

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#6
The Warlord was one of the positions that really had the most "work" to it, so I'd suggest gaming clubs think about that role...
There is almost always one position which ends up getting the majority of work heaped on it. That makes the position very hard to fill, since everyone knows it's the crap job. This is why it's vital to establish committees early on to handle and delegate some of that workload, or else that one person ends up getting frustrated and tired.

Another great column, Alec, keep it up! :)

Other than standoffishness of members, I've found a poorly maintained webpage to be the greatest barrier to interacting with (and joining) college gaming societies. I think I would have joined one a few years ago but for the complete lack of ability to interact with the members and see what they were up to (other than attending a physical meeting).
I agree that a well-maintained web page is a big benefit. However, I'll also say that it's a secondary concern. Yes, it's a very useful tool, but many colleges end up using it incorrectly because they expect it to do more than it should--if most college groups just looked at it as kind of a digital bulletin board, that would be great. Unfortunately, you usually end up with people who want to use it for their CS or digital art project, and then it quickly goes to hell.

That's a big generalization, of course. The BGGS has had some really nice web pages that were done for those reasons. However, it was a real shame to have to get rid of them once we realized how difficult it was to update said page once that member was gone. It's better to stick to simple pages that can be updated quickly and with minimal fuss--that's why I mentioned programs like Rapidweaver in my post. When I was serving as the temporary webmaster, having something like that made it easy to create and add content quickly. It looked sort of canned, but we figured it was more important to get the information out there and update it quickly than to have a fancy looking page.
 
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