5 Player Board Game Recomendations

Njorhg

Active member
Validated User
#11
5 players can be a tricky number.

Kemet is a good strategy game of the area control variety. It also plays up to, and best with, 5 players. It's from 2012, with 2 expansions the last of which came out just recently. Chances are it might be known to some in your group.
 

HDimagination

Building something out of Scrap
Validated User
#12
Power Grid plays five, and is a really solid game.
We're all pretty familar with powergrid. We played it allot quite a few years ago, and have re-visited it recently, and it's showing it's age a bit now. Boardgame design has advanced quite a bit since then, I think
Hansa Teutonica works with 5. Weight wise it's about medium (though the first game is heavier, as it takes a bit to get used to it), it's incredibly strategic, and there's a lot of different viable strategies that you can use.
This looks like more our kind of thing, but looks like the only copies for sale in the uk are going for £150-£350...

Euphoria. My favorite worker-placement game in the whole wide world.
I'll not lie, I read the description of this game and damn near reached for my credit card... This is relevant to my interests...

5 players can be a tricky number.

Kemet is a good strategy game of the area control variety. It also plays up to, and best with, 5 players. It's from 2012, with 2 expansions the last of which came out just recently. Chances are it might be known to some in your group.
This looks interesting too... I know these kinds of games can stretch a bit longer than the forecast play times though... How realistic is it to fit in an evening?
 

Breogan

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#13
Euphoria is nice, yes. Is not my favorite as it is RadioKen, but is good, and it is one of the games in our collection that is kinda of a go-to when we find ourselves being 5.

Not the go-to because some in the club hate the game, but you know what, dont pay attention, we are full of curmudgeons :p
 

Houlio

Gauche
Validated User
#14
This looks interesting too... I know these kinds of games can stretch a bit longer than the forecast play times though... How realistic is it to fit in an evening?
Just to jump in, Kemet is one of the faster "dudes-on-map" games out there due in no small part to its pretty clever design. I don't think I've had a game of it go beyond 2 hours, although it's been a little while since it's hit my table (being in another hemisphere at the moment). That said, if your group has a tendency to play slower, that probably won't change with this.

Another game I want to recommend is Scoville. It is one of the few games I've played that is really enjoyable with a larger number of players, and I haven't found a game quite like it out there. It is quite a bit shorter than the timeframe you're looking at (like 60-90 minutes), but if that isn't a big issue I heartily recommend it. While the rules and process of playing the game are extremely straightforward, the shared board and reversing-turn order adds a ton of depth to the game.
 

VicenteC

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#16
Arkham Horror 3e plays very well with 5, although to play in 2.5 hours you need to know the rules decently. The first time is going to be more like 3-3.5 hours.
 

CarpeGuitarrem

Blogger and gamer
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#17
I'm a fan of Shogun (the 2005 game with the cube tower). I've heard Wallenstein is a better implementation, but I can't speak specifically to how that one is.

Shogun is a game that reminds me a bit of the Total War series, as you manage a corner of Japan and try to build it up while laying claim to the most valuable territories. There's a lot of trickiness surrounding balancing your income, and it has the interesting limitation that each of your territories is only able to take one action. You pre-program your actions on a player board, playing territory cards facedown onto different action spaces; you'll often take every action (although you can choose to decline an action if you don't have the money for it or don't actually want to take it), but you're always focused on what territory gets the most benefit from each action.

There's a row of cards that gives the turn order for all actions, so maybe one turn you get gold before you have to recruit armies, but you won't be able to collect rice until the end of the turn--which means that the territory you're collecting rice from might get captured before you're able to do it, which would negate the action entirely. So there's a lot of uncertainty that gets added to the game in a cool way.

It's not super-super crunchy; I was able to teach it to my siblings and parents pretty easily. I also found it to be very tense at times.

Chicago Express would be another one. It's a tense train game, apparently it's supposedly "18XX lite" (with 18XX games being a famously mechanically intensive genre). You buy stock in train companies, then use the funds that you've invested to build the trains out to cities across the Great Lakes region, which increases their value and therefore pays you back in dividends. The catch is that nobody has exclusive claim on a railroad, and anyone who wins a share of the company in an auction can get in on those dividends and on directing the track. Gets a bit number-crunchy at the end, but it's a pretty neat game overall. Requires some really unique thinking before you get used to it.
 

HDimagination

Building something out of Scrap
Validated User
#18
That looks fascinating. An interesting spin on Puerto Rico with out the... Problematic elements... *Cough*Brown Settlers*Cough*

Arkham Horror 3e plays very well with 5, although to play in 2.5 hours you need to know the rules decently. The first time is going to be more like 3-3.5 hours.
Some-one bought me Arkham horror 2nd ed a couple of years ago, and I've never had the chance to play it (components still shrink wrapped)....
 

Per Andersson

Tired and emotional
Validated User
#19
The old version of Siege of the Citadel worked very well with five players.
The new version should as well, but it isn't quite released yet...
 

VicenteC

Member
RPGnet Member
Validated User
#20
Some-one bought me Arkham horror 2nd ed a couple of years ago, and I've never had the chance to play it (components still shrink wrapped)....
2e and 3e have significant differences, but the main thing is that 3e is much more streamlined and faster. 2e is epic, but it can take forever...
 
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