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[5e] Which Wizard school gets the rawest deal?

Unka Josh

Social Justice Chimera
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Yes, but that's true pedantry. There could be a multiclassed Wizard/Fighter, I suppose, or a Druid who's in animal form who the enemy can't spot, but the odds are pretty good that they'll have a pretty good idea who the likely source of the elemental is, especially if they cast any other spells.
 

Plumy Namesake

Social Justice Commoner
Validated User
Yes, but that's true pedantry. There could be a multiclassed Wizard/Fighter, I suppose, or a Druid who's in animal form who the enemy can't spot, but the odds are pretty good that they'll have a pretty good idea who the likely source of the elemental is, especially if they cast any other spells.
A more conventional challenge would be a party with both a druid and wizard, surely. (and how many kinds of opposition will know that the cleric most likely can't cast it?).
 

Unka Josh

Social Justice Chimera
RPGnet Member
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Well, my assumption was that there was opposition that would know what to do about conjured elementals; this presumably includes knowing which two classes have access to the spell. If your assumptions are otherwise, I suppose that's that.
 

SuperG

Active member
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It also depends on what your Wizard looks like... Mountain Dwarf Conjurer in a party with a Monk for maximal confusion. Throw in a familiar to potentially be a Druid for extra confusion points.

And, of course, since it's a prepared scenario the Wizard could literally sit that one out. Like, hide themselves in a crate or something and just go "I brought an elemental, that is my contribution, you're welcome". After all, you need to ration out your spells and make sure you don't run out.
 

Plumy Namesake

Social Justice Commoner
Validated User
Well, my assumption was that there was opposition that would know what to do about conjured elementals; this presumably includes knowing which two classes have access to the spell. If your assumptions are otherwise, I suppose that's that.
Knowing that classes exist isn't a universal thing assumption, no, because not every campaign treats them as in-fiction constructs (or in-fiction constructs that perfectly map to their phb listings).

But even if you do assume mechanical knowledge, there is no way to know if the elemental is a wild druid in elemental form, or one conjured by a fire domain cleric or by the rogue using brazier of commanding fire elementals, and so on and so forth.
 

Unka Josh

Social Justice Chimera
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Not all of those things you said exist in the core rules (there's no such thing as a "Fire Domain Cleric," and the lack of any Cleric subclass Conjuring Elementals in any official material suggests that it's not going to happen, for that matter), but enough of them do that I concede that it's not necessarily obvious, but we've taken this well and truly off-topic now.
 

Octopus Prime

Retired User
I did a whole big thing over the summer where I was re-tooling D&D to be more akin to Mage: The Awakening (with casters gaining proficiencies in particular schools of magic, instead of having different spell list for each casting class). As part of it, I mapped out all spells by level and school, and hoo boy, yeah, I'm throwing another vote for "Necromancy sucks."
Like Divination and Abjuration, it has a short spell list, with a lot of those spell being cleric instead of wizard spells. And whereas Illusion magic has a short list of very broad and useful spells (Minor Illusion could easily be parsed into a great many more spells, a la the Invocation school) most Necromancy spells are highly specific and not very good.
To add insult to injury, certain types of spells that feel like they really ought to be Necromancy are in other schools (like healing magic is Invocation? Really?)
Of course, spell school has virtually zero bearing on gameplay in 5e, so I suppose it's not that big a deal.
If you'd like to read the fruits of my labor, you can look at it here and here. Spells marked with a * were ones moved from another school.
 

OmSwaOperations

Registered User
Validated User
Can see the divination school is getting a lot of flak here, but I have to say the Diviner's Portent ability (the one where you get to swap out a d20 you've rolled at the start of the day with an attack roll, saving throw or ability check) is almost worth the price of admission in itself. If used well, and saved for those really pivotal rolls, it can have a massive influence on the outcome of an encounter/the game.
 

DarkStarling

Brilliantly Crazed
Validated User
Another reason Necromancy gets a raw deal is that a bunch of effects which, by all rights, SHOULD be necromancy get pulled into other schools. Presumably because they aren't 'raise skeleton army'.

I mean really. Detect Undead? Divination. Undead Anatomy? Transmutation. Blood Biography? Divination again. You get the idea. All the good necromantic effects get yoinked.

Of course there are some good uses for having Necromancy in your repetoire. Deathwine or Death Knell are great ways to boost your caster level in flavorful ways. And there is something ineffably satisfying in the campaign finale of being able to say 'Quickened Enervate, Maximized Enervate' aimed at the boss.
 
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