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A class as weird as its setting?

Straife Milton

Registered User
Validated User
Numenera really advertises itself based on its weirdness.
As it stands, nanos often resemble the role of mages, and cyphers and artifacts are basically "magic items, etc. Is it possible to create a class that is as weird and alien as its setting is supposed to be? One that has a role or skill that has absolutely no parallels whatsoever in something like dungeons and dragons?
 

Bruce Redux

Not flying or biting
Validated User
5th edition D&D warlocks are amazing. One class can do Elric, Joan of Arc, a Doctor Who companion, and more. It really brings the depth and breadth of D&D weirdness right down into play in a very accessible way.
 

KaijuGooGoo

Not Woke until I’ve had my Coffee
RPGnet Member
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If we're talking about settings other than Numenera, 13th Age in Glorantha has some classes tuned to some very distinctive elements of the setting, like the Eurmal Trickster (who goes way beyond a "Chaos Mage' in terms of mostly-favorable randomness) or Hell Mother.
 

wryfool

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Spire definitely wins. You can be a Knight who is also a gang-member, Batman if he worshiped his utility belt, a cannibal priest with a hyena fetish. The list goes on, and stays weird.
 

effkat

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I don’t know DnD well enough to say if it has something similar, but the Symbiote for Apocalypse World 2e (used to be the Macaluso in 1st ed) is pretty special. The Symbiote isn’t one character but a whole colony:

As the symbiote, you are a psyche in some way native to the world’s psychic maelstrom. You live there; it is the medium of your life the way that the earth and air are the medium of others’. However, you are also embodied in this world, in the form of several otherwise apparent human beings. You all seem to live and act and move independently, but it’s an illusion. You’re one creature, you, sharing experiences and thoughts and separated only bodily.
 

Thomas T

Active member
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What a good question. It's so disappointing when a setting's really interesting and the character options are "fighter, rogue or mage."

Tenra Bansho Zero has the mecha pilots, samurai, geisha and ninja you'd expect from an anachrotech fantasy Japan. It also has annelidists - wandering healer monks who are partially composed of a symbiotic colony of centipede-worms.
 

Andurion

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Blades in the Dark has playbooks that, while technically not classes, have pretty much the same function to me. In any case, I always felt the Whisper playbook was as singularly weird as the BitD setting. A ghost-whispering and nefarious arcanist just seems like something that only works in the context of BitD. Of course, YMMV!
 

Random Goblin

Esquire
Validated User
I mean, that's basically the entire premise of Troika! The super weird-ass setting is defined almost entirely by implication from its random character class descriptions. Classes include Befouler of Ponds, Gremlin Catcher, Member of Miss Kinsey's Dining Club, Monkeymonger, Poorly Made Dwarf, Rhino-Man, Thinking Engine, and Zoanthrop.
 
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