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A Contrast of Fantasy Africana D&D Settings

Davies

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That said, I honestly suspect that the Primal Warrior is supposed to be an homage to Tarzan, and I think High Priestess Hava is actually a reference to Ororo Monroe, aka Storm of the X-Men.
Um ... Ayesha/She-Who-Must-Be-Obeyed and La of Opar would like a word with you.
 

ESkemp

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Yikes. This is the sort of stuff you typically see from white authors who are really fond of old pulp stuff but almost entirely clueless when it comes to seeing and working around the racist ideas threaded throughout old pulp stuff. So all the old racist threads get bundled up and transported to their new home to reach a new audience, with a bonus effect of "Let's prove our work is for grownups by making everything worse." Which... doesn't make things less problematic by a long shot.
 

DMH

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How do the AD&D Dragon articles hold up? I know there was about a dozen of them spread between 122 and 202.
 

Straife Milton

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If we take Greyhawk, Krynn, and the Forgotten Realms, we see a _very_ loose connection to real world Europe, but the inspiration is still there. But it's rare to see a monotheistic god that hates "witches." The typical, most common religions are very unlike, say, medieval France. The DnD cleric (a very rare fighting-priest in real life) is instead the norm. And so on. Inspired loosely by real life, but often times flying off into something completely unlike Medieval Christian/Muslim/Jewish Europe. And so on. Various attempts at Arabian or Far Eastern sourcebooks also were very loosely inspired by real life, but again, most of us who are interested in fantasy know at least a little about "Arabian" legends or Japanese Samurai or whatever. But often, not so much with Medieval Africa; often what we think we know about it isn't even as accurate as a DnD Samurai or middle-eastern Genies.

I suspect that part of the issue of making an "African" setting is how much to connect it to real-world medieval Africa (which was 100% skipped in almost all of our high school history classes, I am willing to bet. Hell, medieval Africa was 100% without mention in my college history classes!) How many things should have analogies to real life? How many of them should just say hell the monolith of medieval European Christianity, and do their own thing, like Toril's gods? The cultures? The countries? The classes? The religions? The answers are going to be controversial, I'm betting.
 

Gemini476

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To be fair, they generally aren't that great at D&D Asia either. While you may or may not see Fantasy France and Fantasy Germany in the Fantasy Europe part of the setting (this is usually where the authors put their own pet projects), if you look over to Fantasy Asia you are near guaranteed to find an island nation with samurai and ninja, probably next to a Jade Dragon Empire with a big Anti-Barbarian Wall.

You get Vaguely Europe on one side, with Literally Just Egypt just to the south and Literally Just IRL Asia to the east.

Fantasy Africa's big issue was that they usually aren't even that, they're just Darkest Africa where Dr. Livingstone teams up with Tarzan to fight off cannibals. Japanophilia was at least based on actual history to some extent, but with any bit of Africa south of the Sahara authors put down the history books and pick up the pulp fiction.

Or that's how it used to be, at least. It's good to see that these days people are a bit more respectable on the subject.
 

David Howery

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Fantasy Africa's big issue was that they usually aren't even that, they're just Darkest Africa where Dr. Livingstone teams up with Tarzan to fight off cannibals.
I was about 50% guilty of that back in my DM days. The fantasy version of Africa that I drew up was partly old pulp stuff with jungles and lost cities and the like. But... I also had a fair amount of knowledge about the real Africa, and wanted to include some of the fantastically wealthy/strong nations that were there... so I had them in it as well. It was kind of odd contrasts in places, but it all worked...
 

Libertad

Knight in tarnished armor
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So something of interest. Southlands just became a Gold Best Seller on Drive-Thru RPG. Granted, it was at Electrum (the step below Gold) for years, so it likely recently hit the required threshold. But it looks to be a very popular setting, in line with Kobold Press' other works.

Spears of the Dawn is a Platinum Seller. I recall that Crawford/Sine Nomine tend to reach such marks regularly, but wanted to put that up for contrast.

Nyambe is not for sale on Drive-Thru RPG. The other storefronts which stock it do not have fast and easy references to see its relative popularity.
 

Solon

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There is an indie/self-published game called Ki Khanga. Check out their facebook page.
 
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