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A Contrast of Fantasy Africana D&D Settings

EvilSchemer

Well, I never!
Validated User
Did I miss World of the Lost for Lamentations of the Flame Princess?

General Pitch: A fantasy city set in Real world-ish Africa in the 16th century near a legendary plateau filled with dinosaurs, aliens, and blob monsters
System: Lamentations of the Flame Princess
Strengths: There is no "guide" to the city - there's a procedural generation system to create the city district-by-district, so no two cities are the same. Also, dinosaurs, aliens, and blob monsters.
Weaknesses: I've never played it and I've only cursorily read it, so there may be many problematic things or perceived weaknesses I'm not aware of. It's not really a source book for real-world Africa, culture, or peoples. It creates a fictional city with fictional gods and fictional culture but set in a real world. Like I said, the city is procedurally generated so a lot of the cultural and religious stuff is mostly given through a few pages of background and then hinted at through random table results as you create the city.
 

Lewd Beholder

Member
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Can only speak of the stuff I read personally.

Æsheba: Greek Africa, while an original concept, has language that is really unsuitable for the modern day. It might be salvageable, but needs seriously updated.

Dragon Magazine 189 is still the one to beat and laid down the groundwork for The Jungles of Chult Forgotten Realms supplement (that and the Harper book: the Ring of Winter).

Nyame is a fantasy world, but that's the way dnd worlds should be: only loosely based on historical context.

It's funny, but I find tomb of annihilation to be more racist then the 2e supplement. Just compare the Batri between the two and that's for starters.

and still these I find less offensive then Rifts Africa.

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I'm trying to see if my own work has fallen into the same pratfalls.

I did a post-post apocalyptic vision of the future based in Africa as part of my world, originally for d20, but going to update to 5e when I got the main rules done.

It includes, but is not limited to:

  • An Alien bug army, known as the Void Covenant that invaded the Sahara and has been somewhat stopped due to a civil war between castes.
  • Egypt redone as a place where mummy's maintain the magical infrastructure as local avatars feud with each other for dominance.
  • The Salted Lands, a place ruled by the forsaken of Bhaal.
  • The Afrikaner Republic (this one may be renamed as I'm unsure if Afrikaner is offensive a term), a tech city in part of the remains of South Africa).
  • A warrior empire rapidly expanding using salvaged technology and stolen magic.
  • the blood sun lands: ruled by a pair of demon brothers entrenched from south Africa's past.
  • Poro: A West African crime syndicate controlled by mobster shapeshifters.
  • The Gold Coast Consortium: A technological cyber-region that has sent missionaries from afar.
  • A zone that is ruled by shaggy humanoids known as Ungo. They may have tamed giant monsters to act as a countermeasure for their neighbors
  • A Pridelands ruled by sentient psychic lions. They like to make their human minions drive them around in pickup trucks.
  • The Kingdom of Yala, a kingdom ruled by a mutant elephant man whom tries to balance the different factions whom are tearing themselves apart. It is one of the more populated cities on the continent that is protected by giant magical statues.
  • The compound: a policebot manufacturing site that has achieved sentience and now has imposed martial law over it's lands.
  • A pirate community based off of Madagascar.
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does any of this sound offensive?
 

smarttman

I do some stuff
Validated User
-snip quote-

does any of this sound offensive?
Honestly its not really offensive, but not much more than baseline ideas derived from modern Africa, aka militias in W Africa, pirates off the E African coast, heavy focus on Apartheid, a bunch of African animal kingdoms. If that's what you are going for that's fine, but anything deeper requires some research.

Myself I'm currently working on a setting for Zweihander and I'm having some issues with it as well. Both in researching medieval Africa as well as adapting Africa to dark fantasy without reducing it to Darkest Africa tropes.
 

Daz Florp Lebam

Registered User
Validated User
I think I mentioned this in another thread, but how great would it be to get some actual writers from Asia or from Africa to work on these not-quite Asia or not-quite Africa D&D settings? People steeped in that history and culture, to abstract stuff they like into semi-analogues, as they see fit. I'd buy that.
 

Allandaros

Validated Parking
Validated User
I think I mentioned this in another thread, but how great would it be to get some actual writers from Asia or from Africa to work on these not-quite Asia or not-quite Africa D&D settings? People steeped in that history and culture, to abstract stuff they like into semi-analogues, as they see fit. I'd buy that.
Check out Jerry Grayson's Bastion, Balogun Ojetade & Milton Davis's Ki-Khanga, and Brandon Dixon's Swordfall (upcoming): black authors writing African-inspired settings & games. (None of these applied to Libertad Libertad 's read b/c the systems weren't D&D/d20 based). That said, I'd really love to see more African authors/designers hopping in along with Diasporic authors/designers.

For Southeast Asia, see esp Zedeck Siew and Mun Kao's Thousand Thousand Islands work*, plus a slew and a half of other SEA TTRPG designers rocking out recently.

*Plus Zedeck's upcoming module Lorn Song of the Bachelor.
 

Libertad

Knight in tarnished armor
Validated User
I think I mentioned this in another thread, but how great would it be to get some actual writers from Asia or from Africa to work on these not-quite Asia or not-quite Africa D&D settings? People steeped in that history and culture, to abstract stuff they like into semi-analogues, as they see fit. I'd buy that.
Allandaros touched upon some good examples, but there's also Aurion: Legacy of the Kori-Odan. It's not D&D and actually a video game, but it was designed by a studio in Cameroon. It's a hybrid fighting-RPG style of gameplay.
 

smarttman

I do some stuff
Validated User
Check out Jerry Grayson's Bastion, Balogun Ojetade & Milton Davis's Ki-Khanga, and Brandon Dixon's Swordfall (upcoming): black authors writing African-inspired settings & games. (None of these applied to Libertad Libertad 's read b/c the systems weren't D&D/d20 based). That said, I'd really love to see more African authors/designers hopping in along with Diasporic authors/designers.

For Southeast Asia, see esp Zedeck Siew and Mun Kao's Thousand Thousand Islands work*, plus a slew and a half of other SEA TTRPG designers rocking out recently.

*Plus Zedeck's upcoming module Lorn Song of the Bachelor.
Not to derail, but is Ki-Khanga available in PDF format at all? Been looking for the game for a while and haven't dug up anything
 

Libertad

Knight in tarnished armor
Validated User
Not to derail, but is Ki-Khanga available in PDF format at all? Been looking for the game for a while and haven't dug up anything
It does not seem to be. I believe that the crowdfunded project only provided for physical copies. There was apparently a PDF on Drive-Thru RPG, but it has since become a "not available" title.
 
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