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A Note on Wizkids Deep Cuts and Nolzurs...and the painting thereof

Gavin Bennett

What Would Trudeau Do?
Validated User
Hi all

I've gotten a lot of these things in the last few years. But painting them is hard going. The details are pretty soft, and they are already covered in a heavy lot of undercoat. My usual techniques for painting figures has turned out to be pretty hit and miss.

Last night after some googling, I turned up this:

https://www.reddit.com/r/dndnext/comments/9jy87y
I strongly recommend you have a look.
Basically ways to work with the peculiarities of the figures rather than against them: vallejo inks feature strongly, in lieu of paint.
(This should have been more obvious - I've had a lot of success using the Vallejo inks on the transparent elements of these figures)

Worth a few minutes of your time.
 

pogre

Registered User
Validated User
+1 Good tutorial and quality speed paint. Not crazy about the results of the eyes, but still very high quality overall for tabletop level painting.
 

Morsla

I mostly paint things
Validated User
Early reviews have mentioned that the Contrast paints look great, but rub off fairly easily - so for boardgame miniatures that would be handled a lot, spraying the finished models with varnish sounds like the way to go.
 

wirecrossing

illegal jokes
Validated User
Early reviews have mentioned that the Contrast paints look great, but rub off fairly easily - so for boardgame miniatures that would be handled a lot, spraying the finished models with varnish sounds like the way to go.
Doesn't everyone varnish their minis????
 

wirecrossing

illegal jokes
Validated User
No, though I possibly should.

I stumbled across Mini Junkie's videos myself recently, and suddenly painting the Nolzur's T-rex I bought looks a lot less intimidating than it did.
That's interesting. It was one of the things I was taught when I started painting, so I never really questioned it.
 

prankster_dragon

Something Terrible
Validated User
That's interesting. It was one of the things I was taught when I started painting, so I never really questioned it.
Well, I was self-taught and picked up several poor practices from it, not varnishing to protect good painting being one of them.

I've never seen the need for my tabletop standard dudes. The older Citadel paints stayed on well enough.
There's also this.
 
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