A world without mountains - consequences?

gnomewerks

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The God of Legos grabs his bucket, sets onto the world and starts building. Forests, mountains, forts, walled cities, etc.
An apathetic, depressed god wanders down onto the same world and starts sluggin' through. Dragging his feet, taking all of the efforts of the lego god with him. The land is barren and lacking any elevation or interesting terrain as a result.

It's not so much as this story as it is more about really enjoying a world map I recently made and not wanting to muck up the aesthetics by filling it with a bunch of jagged triangles.

I never like to combine fantasy and realism in the same sentence (;)) but..
If my world didn't have mountains, what sort of consequences would come from that? What reasonable (dare I say realistic) things might an adventurer expect to see in regards to culture, society, climate, resources, etc., as a result of NO mountains.

Where would you put your dwarves?

Thank you!
 

Terhali

Weird and pissed off
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There's nothing to stop winds sweeping across the plains. Lots of wind, carrying pollen and dust.
 

DNE

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Your roads could go in straight lines, and so could armies, I think. Cultures would not be isolated.
 

Oswald Cobblepot

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Mountains are in fact a myth, as the authorities have explained clearly many times.

(I really thought this thread would be Night Vale inspired.)
 

Kredoc

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Assuming there were some elevation changes, rivers would likely be meandering things and water-cut canyons and ravines (and swamps and lakes formed by rivers finding new courses) would be common. Maybe take a look at maps of the US great plains states for inspiration. They're... pretty flat.
 

soltakss

Simon Phipp - RQ Fogey
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If my world didn't have mountains, what sort of consequences would come from that? What reasonable (dare I say realistic) things might an adventurer expect to see in regards to culture, society, climate, resources, etc., as a result of NO mountains.
Hills take the place of mountains as sacred places. You might still have ridgelines and so on.

Mountains stop winds and pen in weather systems, so everything would be plains, farmland, steppe, forest and so on.

People would still build things like pyramids and towers, as they would give height advantage. They wouldn't resemble man-made mountains, though.

Where would you put your dwarves?
Underground, where all good dwarves belong.[/QUOTE]
 
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Maxen M

Somewhere off to the side
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Lets say you still have hills, lakes etc. but nothing ever goes above a gentle rolling curve that is easily climbed.

Then probably compare it to the plains of america or africa, with storms moving through steadily seen from miles away, tornadoes, very seasonal climates.
 

DavetheLost

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It would have a huge impact on climate. No vast deserts in the rain shadow of mountain ranges. No rainforests on the side of the mountain ranges where the clouds drop moisture picked up from seas either. So you would not have the rainy Pacific Northwest, nor the arid Southwest.

Very likely on geological level ou would not have plate tectonics. No uplift mountains caused by plates running into each other. So the continents would likely have been fixed in position. Expect very different evolutionary paths on different continents. None of the cross continental exchanges of large animal taxa that occurred in the prehistory of earth would have happened.
 

SorcererNinja

Ace Valkryie Pilot
RPGnet Member
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It would have a huge impact on climate. No vast deserts in the rain shadow of mountain ranges. No rainforests on the side of the mountain ranges where the clouds drop moisture picked up from seas either. So you would not have the rainy Pacific Northwest, nor the arid Southwest.

Very likely on geological level ou would not have plate tectonics. No uplift mountains caused by plates running into each other. So the continents would likely have been fixed in position. Expect very different evolutionary paths on different continents. None of the cross continental exchanges of large animal taxa that occurred in the prehistory of earth would have happened.
Could you get around that issue by doing old school lost continents that rise and fall to bridge things, like Lemuria? Assuming that you don't want to run with isolated flora and fauna, that is.
 
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