A world without mountains - consequences?

soltakss

Simon Phipp - RQ Fogey
Validated User
If it helps I can spin up a primer on plate tectonics and mountain formation if you tell me what level to pitch it too? I'll try and do some digging on mineral vein formation /exposure so I can be sure of the answer on mineral availability too?
Where does Plate Tectonics fit in with the God who squashed all the mountains flat from the OP?
 

Maxen M

Somewhere off to the side
Validated User
If you want to embrace a world made then ground flat, then you can probably get all kinds of mineral deposits and things, as the bends and folds of the structure of the world during its formation are revealed.

Then probably you can get a wear pattern or something where certain kinds of rocks dissolved and formed seas and lakes, but left most of the rest staying as they were ground.
 

Aaron Mouritsen

RadioFreeDeath
Validated User
Is life even long term possible on a flat earth? I mean mountains provide protection to plants and tsunamis and storms. Without any sort of geological shelter, would winds just tear all life off the planet in a few weeks or months?
 

TheHistorian

Registered User
Validated User
Wouldn't no moving tectonic plates imply nothing moving beneath? Thus, no geothermal energy? Sounds like a dead world to me.
 

Eled the Worm Tamer

Spider Jeruselem's Warior
Validated User
Wouldn't no moving tectonic plates imply nothing moving beneath? Thus, no geothermal energy? Sounds like a dead world to me.
Not nesiscaraly, see mars which has no plates and had substantial vulcanism that in combination made Olympus Mons the largest (But perhaps shallowest) mountain in the solar system.
 

gnomewerks

Registered User
Validated User
Digesting all of your amazing thoughts, suggestions and advice. I'll chime in with more details, thanks and perhaps more questions later.

Thank you
 

Icon

Old enough to know better
Validated User
Not nesiscaraly, see mars which has no plates and had substantial vulcanism that in combination made Olympus Mons the largest (But perhaps shallowest) mountain in the solar system.
But Olympus Mons is a mountain (well a volcano, but that's kinda quibbly if we're aiming for no peaks--Mt St Helens, Mt Etna, and several other mountains around the world are volcanos as well). If the world has no mountains then presumably not only are there no plate tectonics there is no vulcanism of the type which creates peaks.

I am kinda wondering what effect wind/rain/sea erosion has over time with no mechanism for building up land.
 

Eled the Worm Tamer

Spider Jeruselem's Warior
Validated User
But Olympus Mons is a mountain (well a volcano, but that's kinda quibbly if we're aiming for no peaks--Mt St Helens, Mt Etna, and several other mountains around the world are volcanos as well). If the world has no mountains then presumably not only are there no plate tectonics there is no vulcanism of the type which creates peaks.
That was in literally my first post in the thread, I was just pointing out (In the post you quoted) that absence of tectonic plates does not nesicaraly mean an absence of active mantle/core dynamics.
 
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