A world without mountains - consequences?

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Old enough to know better
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That was in literally my first post in the thread, I was just pointing out (In the post you quoted) that absence of tectonic plates does not nesicaraly mean an absence of active mantle/core dynamics.
Fair enough, though in the case there are no plate tectonics and no vulcanism is there any type of core activity which can exist that does not yield peaks?
 

Delgarde

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Water will always rise out of springs, and these will converge into rivers since the land can't be perfectly flat (unless it is a continent of polished marble).
But how much water do you get that way? Almost all of the worlds great rivers have their origins in the high mountains... rivers of rain melted snow running across continents, water that originally fell in the Rockies or the Andes or the Himalayas or African highlands, flowing vast distances. And they're big rivers in part because the mountains shape them... streams descending valleys, converging on their way to the more open plains below, occasionally meeting other big rivers flowing the same way.

By contrast, there aren't a lot of big rivers fed exclusively by low-land streams and low-land snow melt... and while I'm no expert on the subject, I suspect that's because the low-volume slow-moving streams that would arise in lowlands won't travel far before being drained by the land and by evaporation. So I'd guess that in the absence of mountains, the only big rivers you'd get are in tropical environments where they're driven by the monsoon rains... and I've no idea if you'd still get those, given how much a lack of mountains would mess with air currents and stuff.
 

Michele

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The answer is lots of swamps. Yes, there's great evaporation, but then it rains down again. It's a world where it's pretty hard to keep your feet dry.
 

Mr_Flibble

Professional Amateur
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As a Dutchman I have to ask, what are these mountains you speak of? ;)

So rivers will still be rolling down stream, oceans will still have tides etc?
Coastal and river delta communities will likely to have created villages consisting of stilt houses or dammed off pieces of land to create dry areas...provided they have mills or pumps to keep it that way.
 

Shan Andy

One man and his giraffe
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(Note that a henge is an earthen mound. They only sometimes have stone monuments on top. A lot of people are confused about this.)
Strictly speaking, a henge is a roughly circular embankment with an internal ditch. There's more to it than that but, for now, it'll do.

Barrows, on the other hand, are usually mounds of dirt. Round ones are usually in a prominent place in the landscape. I could see them being a popular way of venerating the dead
 

TheMouse

garmonbozia
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Strictly speaking, a henge is a roughly circular embankment with an internal ditch. There's more to it than that but, for now, it'll do.

Barrows, on the other hand, are usually mounds of dirt. Round ones are usually in a prominent place in the landscape. I could see them being a popular way of venerating the dead
Sure, but the distinction you're making is material to neither the topic at hand nor to my point.
 

Michele

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I am kinda wondering what effect wind/rain/sea erosion has over time with no mechanism for building up land.
Wind and sea also build up (low) elevations. Sand dunes in the desert are made by wind, sand dunes along the coasts are made by waves and tides. It's interesting that there's a Dutch poster here. I bicycled in Holland, and the place where you find a natural (modest) uphill area is when you are nearing the sea. It's the coastal area where dunes were colonized by hardy plants and developed into (more or less) permanent (low) hills.

Rains and the subsequent slowly moving, meandering water flows, coupled with rain-caused and freshwater-caused erosion will probably mean that the swamps, deeper canals, and few high-ground areas will be constantly changing. You build a village on a rise that is a few feet above the marshlands, but in a few revolutions it might be washed down underwater, while mud is deposited somewhere else until it blocks a canal and creates another rise.
 

Kredoc

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Rains and the subsequent slowly moving, meandering water flows, coupled with rain-caused and freshwater-caused erosion will probably mean that the swamps, deeper canals, and few high-ground areas will be constantly changing. You build a village on a rise that is a few feet above the marshlands, but in a few revolutions it might be washed down underwater, while mud is deposited somewhere else until it blocks a canal and creates another rise.
There's a Monty Python swamp castle joke in there somewhere...

But this raises a good point. Settlements will likely be on elevated areas near reliable water sources. Once established, they'll likely create more elevation around them. Humans are great at dumping garbage, and the accumulated waste of an entire city is going to expand/increase the city's footprint.
 

gnomewerks

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Man, you're all very helpful. I have a few more questions. Really appreciate the discussion, as somewhere in there, I try and think about adventure and story in this weird world.

How much do mountains play into the mineral aspect of things. Would I only have a Dark Sun place with bone and wood weapons only? Would steel, iron and such even be a thing? If not from mountains, where do the "mining dwarves" get such resources.
 
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