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Aeternal Legends

Poster #15672

Fuzzy Wuzzy Wuv MACHINE!
gw: I don't know. ;)

nick: There was discussion here about the game last night. It's written by two White Wolf vets, and has some interesting features.
 

Nick The Lemming

Lord Gort
RPGnet Member
Validated User
gw: I don't know. ;)

nick: There was discussion here about the game last night. It's written by two White Wolf vets, and has some interesting features.
Thanks! I missed that thread somehow. It looks interesting. Has anyone played through it yet at all? What's the Ready 2 Run system like?
 

Poster #15672

Fuzzy Wuzzy Wuv MACHINE!
Ready 2 Run looks like one of those systems that sounds more complicated than it plays. IOW, once you use it, it's smooth, but you wouldn't know that from anyone describing it. :D

Roll a pile of d6s, based on your Attribute +Aptitude (Aptitudes are small packages of skills wrapped up in a profession. Soldier, for example.) Rolls of 1-2 are successful, 3-6 is ignored. Add up the successful numbered dice, highest wins. Because these guys are WW veterans, there are thresholds to determine the quality of your success depending on how soundly you beat your opponent. It's all subtle variations from there.

AEternal Legends is interesting because it reminds me of Clinton R. Nixon's game Paladin, only it's not so minimal in mechanics. In Paladin, and AEL, the focus of the game is the character's beliefs, and how they must stick to them no matter what to get ahead. Conviction of beliefs fuels the magic in this game. Compromising your beliefs, or simply turning your back on them, is the path of the Darkside, and turns you into a villain. While you get more magical ability on the Dark side of things, it compromises your log-term ability to grow. plus, you add to the apathy, cynicism, and despair in the world. Keep in mind, however, that just because you uphold your beliefs doesn't mean your beliefs are worth of being upheld: there are many of those who uphold the Sphere of Strength (a Sphere being a weird cross between a philosophy, an archetype, and a character class) who believe that "Might makes right." They will uphold their belief in that, and consequences be damned.

So, the good guys (the PCs and those aligned with them) don't always do good things, and legitimate disagreements can do more damage than the Dark side can.
It's the price you pay as a fanatic, to balance out the clarity that it brings.

One thing I've had difficulty finding in the rules is a mechanic that would allow PCs (Legends, in the game terms) to change beliefs, dropping more troublesome beliefs for ones easier to support in good conscience. I think it's there, but I'm not sure where. I'll have to read it more thoroughly. I'm sure it is there, as that's a wonderful way to show character growth.

Also, keep in mind that the majority of this game occurs, magic and weirdness and all, in our modern world. It's important to remember that, because that contrast adds so much to the game.
 

DigitalRaven

Social Justice Pontiff
Validated User
why is it spelled 'aeternal'?
Because I like the look of the Æ ligature. ;)

And because of words like æon, æsculapius, and others that have that hard "E" sound at the front. It's making explicit the connection with æon, æther, and other such funky vaguely-occult sounding words.
 

The Yann Waters

Under Someone Else's Bed
Compromising your beliefs, or simply turning your back on them, is the path of the Darkside, and turns you into a villain.
Hmm. But wouldn't that simply mean that your character eventually acquires new beliefs, instead? After all, giving up on the conviction that, say, "might makes right" should logically lead into the belief that might doesn't make right. Or are the powers of these Darksiders fueled by the hypocrisy of pretending to believe in one thing while acting according to another?

(Apart from that, the system reminds me of the Codes in Nobilis.)
 

Poster #15672

Fuzzy Wuzzy Wuv MACHINE!
Hmm. But wouldn't that simply mean that your character eventually acquires new beliefs, instead? After all, giving up on the conviction that, say, "might makes right" should logically lead into the belief that might doesn't make right. Or are the powers of these Darksiders fueled by the hypocrisy of pretending to believe in one thing while acting according to another?

(Apart from that, the system reminds me of the Codes in Nobilis.)
Not necessarily. In this game, there is a huge difference between simply turning your back on your ideals, and actually taking the effort to reexamine your ideals, making amends for your mistakes, and turning your life around. To turn to the Dark Side means not only turning your back on your beliefs, but also spitting on the idea that beliefs (ANY of them) have any actual meaning and should have any respect. That feeds Lord Da'ath, the main bad guy in this game, who is the embodiment of the Abyss of Despair and Nihilism. If your character progresses far enough during the game, you will end up having to combat him head-on. If you turn to the Dark side, you inevitably become his slave. While hypocrisy is a concern, it's less of a concern than refusing to commit to a course of action for fear you might be wrong. If you're wrong, suffer the consequences, make amends, and change. Simple, but by no means easy. And that's the point.

Like I mentioned in that same post you quoted, I am sure that there is a mechanic for switching over to a new, saner belief, but I haven't seen it yet. I'd like Digital Raven to clarify that.
 

Poster #15672

Fuzzy Wuzzy Wuv MACHINE!
To answer the question you asked more clearly, the Darksiders powers are fueled from knowingly and deliberately sabotaging their beliefs, to demonstrate that beliefs have no meaning and no power. Thus, they are fueled by Da'ath, the embodiment of Nihilism and Despair, the Crack in the World's Architecture.

Darksiders had faith, had a moment of clarity where finally everything made sense. That moment gave them the power they had and still have. For some reason or another, they've thrown it away. They may not think they had a choice, but they did. They can turn back, but the all-too-human sense of feeling shame for being wrong is a powerful obstacle. So they settle for cheap displays of bravado and toy-collecting, instead of the ultimate enlightenment which is their birthright.

If you can't tell, AEternal Legends is chock-full of Gnosticism. :D
 

The Yann Waters

Under Someone Else's Bed
To turn to the Dark Side means not only turning your back on your beliefs, but also spitting on the idea that beliefs (ANY of them) have any actual meaning and should have any respect.
Ah. What struck me as a tad oddish is that the idea of beliefs being unworthy of respect seems like a belief in itself, paradoxically enough. So it's a little different from Nob in that these convictions are not objectively equal: supporting Lord Da'ath constitutes an "anti-belief"?
 
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