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(Anime) Cop Craft like lethal weapon but with a sword elf

E.K.K.R

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I watched the first episode and I am going to watch the rest as well. The show knows what it is, and makes no excuses.
 

Spook

Burn the Heretic. Purge the unclean.
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22912

Have a setting map.

According to the map scale the island its on must be a pretty decent size, especially to make it a State.
 

Old Toby

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Have a setting map.

According to the map scale the island its on must be a pretty decent size, especially to make it a State.
The scales on the two maps don't seem to match. In the corner map we seem to see about 60 miles of coast (though, admittedly, the sixty miles to the gate could be diagrammatic and not to scale). The bottom map is roughly 25 miles wide, by its scale, but corresponds to only a tiny smidgin of the coast shown in the corner map. Also the scale in the bottom map really doesn't seem to fit with what one would expect from a map in that style. Without the scale, it would probably be straining things to estimate the entire map is five miles wide...

But population is more relevant to statehood than area. They mentioned the population was over 2 million. Compare with Hawaii at 1.4 million (but also Puerto Rico at 3.2 million).

Somewhat inconsistently, the badges say "State of Kariaena" but the license plates seem to be for San Teresa...

"San Teresa" bugs me. I'm not aware of any language that uses "San", not "Santa" for female saint's names...

Old Toby
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Eric the .5b

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This looks neat, but I wish fewer characters in anime described as "a beautiful girl" looked like twelve-year-olds...

It's American. We do that kind of shit to names all the time.
I'd agree, except we don't really use saint-names as toponyms unless someone already named the place that way, due to the whole Protestant thing.

I just shrug and file it with good ethnically-English names like Seras Victoria and Walter Dornez. ;)
 

Old Toby

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I'd agree, except we don't really use saint-names as toponyms unless someone already named the place that way, due to the whole Protestant thing.
Not entirely... Frex, there are a whole bunch of "Spanish" place names in California that were coined by Anglos trying to give it a "Spanish flavor", and I'm pretty sure there are saint-names in that group. And there's a fair smattering of saint-names across the midwest, though a lot of those might be from French settlers. St. Olaf College, though, was founded by Lutherans...

The English-speaking Caribbean is filled with saint-names. Not just the islands, which were mostly named by the Spanish, but also towns and local subdivisions. The latter are often called "parishes" and seem to originate in Anglican church parishes, hence the saint names. The South Carolina low country used to follow this practice, but switched to an all-county system after the Civil War (none of the counties retain saint's names).

Then there's St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana, which is... complicated...

Old Toby
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Eric the .5b

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Not entirely... Frex, there are a whole bunch of "Spanish" place names in California that were coined by Anglos trying to give it a "Spanish flavor", and I'm pretty sure there are saint-names in that group. And there's a fair smattering of saint-names across the midwest, though a lot of those might be from French settlers.
Not just might be, but almost certainly are, like St. Louis and a number of names in Louisiana. (College names being rather distinct from city names.) I also really can't think of any cobbled-together Spanish toponyms that are saint names.

The English-speaking Caribbean is filled with saint-names. Not just the islands, which were mostly named by the Spanish, but also towns and local subdivisions.
How many of them have saint-names that don't date back to Spanish or French control, much less don't date back and yet are named in Spanish or French?
 

Old Toby

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How many of them have saint-names that don't date back to Spanish or French control, much less don't date back and yet are named in Spanish or French?
Well, for example, here's a map of Barbados, where the English were the first European colonists, and held the colony straight to independence (though technically they became the British about eighty years in).



Old Toby
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Eric the .5b

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Well, for example, here's a map of Barbados, where the English were the first European colonists, and held the colony straight to independence (though technically they became the British about eighty years in).
Well, after the Portuguese left, but fair enough. All pointedly English names though. Spanish saint-names cobbled together by non-speakers seem a lot thinner on the ground.
 
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