• The Infractions Forum is available for public view. Please note that if you have been suspended you will need to open a private/incognito browser window to view it.

(Anime) Cop Craft like lethal weapon but with a sword elf

books-to-the-sky

Registered User
Validated User
What if in their universe there was a saint by the name of Eresa, and the city was founded/named by Italians, who called it "Sant'Eresa" -- which was then rebracketed by Americans, more familiar with Spanish-language saint names, as "San Teresa"?

/fanwank
 

Old Toby

Least Known Dog on the Net
Validated User
Well, after the Portuguese left, but fair enough. All pointedly English names though. Spanish saint-names cobbled together by non-speakers seem a lot thinner on the ground.
I never said they did that in the Caribbean. I said in the Caribbean the British probably named things after Anglican parishes. Which had saint's names, even though these particular parishes were established well after England went Protestant (and Barbados had a lot of Puritan settlers to boot...).

I suspected that some of the saint's names in California were Anglo concoctions, but after a lot of googling I can't find any clear examples. I can find plenty of cases where Anglos gratuitously decided to name a new town after a nearby ranch, mission, or geographical feature with a saint's name (dating back to the Spanish or Mexican periods), though. And one case (San Clemente) where they named it after an island 60 miles out to sea from their town...

Looking at midwestern examples, shows some odd patterns. Frex, St. Paul, Minnesota was named by a Catholic Priest with a French name, sent to serve some local French-American settlers... in 1841, long after the territory had become American. A town called St. Peter, Minnesota was then founded in emulation of St. Paul, by Anglos. As for St. Cloud, "John Wilson, a Maine native with French Huguenotancestry and an interest in Napoleon, named the settlement St. Cloud after Saint-Cloud, the Paris suburb where Napoleon had his favorite palace." I'm gonna call that an Anglo naming, given that even his French ancestor was Protestant...

Old Toby
Least Known Dog on the Net
 

Eric the .5b

Hail the Milleni-odel!
Validated User
I never said they did that in the Caribbean.
Neither did I say you had, or that I was referring specifically to the Caribbean in that sentence. I was trying to actually get things back to the scenario of a American place-naming using a bad Spanish saint-name, since the counter-examples kept getting further from the US. Even your couple of American examples in the last post are all Anglo namings, not Spanish ones, with one by a Catholic priest and another not actually being named for a saint.. You're scouring for rare counter-examples to a strong general trend of not using saint-names in the US, which is all that I pointed out.

I suspected that some of the saint's names in California were Anglo concoctions, but after a lot of googling I can't find any clear examples. I can find plenty of cases where Anglos gratuitously decided to name a new town after a nearby ranch, mission, or geographical feature with a saint's name (dating back to the Spanish or Mexican periods), though. And one case (San Clemente) where they named it after an island 60 miles out to sea from their town...
In all those cases, that's just repurposing an existing Spanish name, not making a saint-name and getting the Spanish wrong.

Really, if we're going to fan-wank a Spanish flub, why not just say there's a male saint named Teresa in this world?
 

AndrewTBP

You are Number 6
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I can tell you there's a placename in Sydney that's pronounced San Suzy. :)
It's named for the palace in Potsdam, though.
 
Top Bottom