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(Anthem) What's It Really Like?

Catfish

Abominable Caftan
Validated User
If the players are willing to show some patience.

They will probably need to keep some meaningful baseline flowing through Anthem's cash shop to justify continued development.
 

Turelie

Maddeningly Altruistic
RPGnet Member
Validated User
tbh the article does make me wonder about the cash shop -- It isn't particularly well done. There's a rotating selection of items, rather than everything available at once. Which is pretty bad.

Like, customizing suits is probably one of the most attractive features of the game, but since the different armor pieces are all within the shop and only infrequently so, it feels like a chunk of customization items exist in game, but are mostly inaccessible because of a weird design decision.
 

Rainfall

Registered User
Validated User
tbh the article does make me wonder about the cash shop -- It isn't particularly well done. There's a rotating selection of items, rather than everything available at once. Which is pretty bad.

Like, customizing suits is probably one of the most attractive features of the game, but since the different armor pieces are all within the shop and only infrequently so, it feels like a chunk of customization items exist in game, but are mostly inaccessible because of a weird design decision.
It's not weird when you put yourself in the "right" headspace. They're creating an artificial rarity so people are driven to purchase an item when it's available, as quickly as possible, and complement with something they might not really want but might like in the future.

It's bad for the player, but fun isn't really a priority for a "game as service".

EDIT: Gotta ask, what the fuck does "being the Bob Dylan of videogames" mean anyway? :unsure:
 

Uncle Claudius

Villain, villain, smiling damned villain.
Validated User
There's a point in the game where the soundtrack switches from acoustic and the fanbase gets angry.
 

Rainfall

Registered User
Validated User
Ha! :ROFLMAO:

You know, a soundtrack of drums and acoustic guitar could have been awesome and distinctive.
 

Vargen

Registered User
Validated User
Speaking of music and "what Anthem's really like," I have to say I dig the didgeridoos in the soundtrack.

If The Division, Rainbow Six and friggin' No Man's Sky can recover, so can Anthem.

... IF EA is willing to show some patience. Which is aksing for a lot.
If EA is smart, they'll look at what they have with Anthem and say "this is a good foundation; this could be our Warframe."

I mean, something has to have gone right with a game if I spawn into a bugged mission that isn't progressing and spend 20 minutes there anyway because I'm having fun.
 

George Angell

Registered User
Validated User
Honestly I think if they were going to send it out in the state it was in, they should have bitten the bullet and made it free to play. Copy Warframe's monetization model with a heavy focus on selling extra cosmetic items to dress up your mechs.

People would have been unhappy with the many issues the game has, but they would have been a lot more forgiving and EA/BW would have had more breathing room to get it into better shape.

They still might be able to do that of course, but folks are going to cutting them a lot less slack and I don't know if EA is that interested in pulling it out or if they're just going to write it off as a sunk cost and pull the plug.
 

Brawndo

Murder Time Fun Time!
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Frankly, even the "good" Bioware games have been rather... shaky software products. I love Jade Empire to bits, but as a game it's a rather rushed thing with some awesome but badly implemented ideas
I had to comment just to cosign this. As much as there is to love about Bioware's games (and there's historically quite a bit to love), they've always had their issues and their issues have been persistent.

Especially when the games have online components. There's a startling similarity to those aspects.

Mass Effect 3 multiplayer - incredibly fun gameplay, really wonky netcode (constantly getting dropped from matches, game client freezing up, being mysteriously unable to join your friends' games, etc), RNG lootbox character and weapon unlocks (I played that game regularly for over 2 years and never once saw the Prothean Particle Rifle). I played it near-daily for over two years after its release, long after new content started coming out because even considering all that, it was crazy fun.

Dragon Age Inquisition multiplayer- incredibly fun gameplay, same really wonky netcode, similar RNG lootbox character and weapon unlocks. You could also break down loot and use the parts to make the character unlocks, which resulted in tedious one-at-a-time dismantling of all the garbage loot into usable parts There was also the added terrible idea where the only way to make your characters stronger to take on the higher difficulties was to reset their level and level them back up again, which was so un-fun that I eventually just decided I didn't need to play the higher difficulties. Yet, , my friends and I played it nightly for months because we were having fun with it.

Mass Effect Andromeda multiplayer - mostly fun gameplay (had some terrible weapon balance issues at launch), the wonky netcode once again, same random loot-leveling as ME3, but after a couple of months they flooded the loot pool by making 3 additional variants of every weapon which astronomically lowered your chances of getting what you're hoping for in favor of giving you additional versions of guns you already have and hate. This one had the added bonus of grossly unfair bugs and major clipping problems (like the biggest scariest enemies having an unintended teleportation and "phasing through walls and floors" abilities), and huge clipping issues. It was a daily occurrence to have people clip through the floor and end up under the map, never to return. Still, I had a great deal of fun with it. I didn't quit playing until they announced the end of support for it and I realized all those bugs were never getting fixed.

Anthem is 100% in line with all of BW's past multiplayer efforts. The gameplay is fun as hell. The variety of options to build your loadout is vast and there's lots of different and effective ways to approach it. Customization is the best of any of the games on this list. Netcode is wonky in all the exact same ways as their previous titles. It's gotten WAY better since the beta, but we're still dealing with issues getting randomly booted out of groups and with menu graphics not loading, general game lockups. The one improvement they had here was a system that is very good at putting you back in the group you just got disconnected from after you restart the game - but that's more like a concession than an improvement. Loot progression is of course random, but the drop rates are so stingy that if you get worked up about not getting good loot, you better just stay away. There's lots of weird shit, like if you get killed during a mission and respawn, you respawn literally miles away from the fight, and about thirty seconds after you've started flying back, it suddenly tells you you're too far from the fight and you're going to get teleported. Why not just spawn me closer then? Also, the other day I played a mission where the mission goal was listed as [Temp Goal] : Defeat the Encounter. It's a mess in many ways, but it's also very beautiful, with amazing visuals, the music is good, and sound effects are satisfying. It's just overall fun to play so I'm sticking around for now. There's a great game in there.

When people express outrage that they've basically paid to be beta testers for a AAA game, it's a fair point but on the other hand I have to wonder how people continuously are surprised every time it happens. It's not a new thing for a company to rush out an obviously not-polished product and worry about the details later. If people want this to stop happening, gamers need to quit buying games months before they come out. There's being taken advantage of, and there's walking into an obvious trap that experience should have taught you to avoid by now.

People would have been unhappy with the many issues the game has, but they would have been a lot more forgiving and EA/BW would have had more breathing room to get it into better shape.

They still might be able to do that of course, but folks are going to cutting them a lot less slack and I don't know if EA is that interested in pulling it out or if they're just going to write it off as a sunk cost and pull the plug.
I don't really see them pulling the plug on this. They've had more controversial launches than this in recent memory (Battlefront II anyone?), and scrambling to get the game where it needs to be after the fact has paid off for them.
 

Rainfall

Registered User
Validated User
I had to comment just to cosign this. As much as there is to love about Bioware's games (and there's historically quite a bit to love), they've always had their issues and their issues have been persistent.
The article also gives an inkling as of why Bioware has trouble learning from it's mistakes. I mean, the team dedicated to making an MMO as the B team? Not being allowed to compare their game to Destiny?

I don't really see them pulling the plug on this. They've had more controversial launches than this in recent memory (Battlefront II anyone?), and scrambling to get the game where it needs to be after the fact has paid off for them.
They certainly had no problem dropping Andromeda like it was on fire.

Very curious to see where EA and Bioware will go...
 
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Shiro

Resplendent and Coniferous
Validated User
They still might be able to do that of course, but folks are going to cutting them a lot less slack and I don't know if EA is that interested in pulling it out or if they're just going to write it off as a sunk cost and pull the plug.
I don't think there's much chance of pulling the plug. The plan has always been to support and improve the game for multiple years as a live service; it's just that the first six(?) months will largely be geared towards getting the game into the state it should have been in at launch.

Also, I'm not personally that put out since I paid for the full-price game — because there's no subscription fee, there's no season pass, there's no paid story DLC. I have access to Anthem and all that it will become, at no extra cost, so long as I'm patient enough to wait for it. Sure, it would have been nice if they got their ducks in a row and put out a more polished game on launch day, but it is what it is.
 
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