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[Article Link] How Dungeons & Dragons Became so Wonderfully Gay

ajdynon

Registered User
Validated User
Thought people might be interested in this article (actually wasn't sure whether to post this here or in TGO, since there have been other GLBTQ+-friendly RPGs that preceded it)

 

Azimer the Mad

Knight of Chaos
Validated User
Can I say that I really appreciate the mod staff here for pre-emptively policing the homophobes on this topic?

Poster: Waterdeep Dragon Heist has too much politics.
MOD: MORTAL, DOST THOU SPEAK OF ANYTHING EXCEPT THE EXISTENCE OF LGBT NPCS? CLARIFY THYSELF.
Poster:...
MOD: BANNED
 

DeathbyDoughnut

a.k.a. Mr. Meat Popcicle
Validated User
Excellent article! Love the industry's push for inclusiveness, as a LGBTQ+ gamer myself I am always happy to see positivity promoted in the community.

The author's experience about being a woman in a game store is an important reminder that even without being pushed away. Many people are intimidated about approaching groups even in at a game store.

Personally, I try to run games that are as inviting as possible, and personally extend invitations to all my friends and family even if they aren't terribly interested, or are unsure about playing roleplaying games.
 

Kuildeous

Registered User
Validated User
It's cool to see D&D be more inclusive considering I had a bad taste with TSR and the RPGA when their writing guidelines explicitly forbade having gay characters. Steve Jackson Games wouldn't submit RPGA events because of that, which kudos to SJG for that.

I know it was a different time. This was back when D&D was still recovering from the satanic panic of the '80s, so it was easier for them to avoid tacking on the queer agenda on top of that. It made me rather bitter that they would go out of their way to not even acknowledge homosexuality in their games. Pretty much, I imagine most of the fan base they were trying to appeal to was of the "I don't want politics in my games" mentality. I honestly don't even know if the movers and shakers of the RPGA were homophobic. Maybe they weren't; they just didn't want to lose customers.

Granted, like the Ship of Theseus, the D&D staff probably has little in common with the AD&D/RPGA staff of the '80s and early '90s. But it's still pretty cool. I may not be much of a D&D fan, but I applaud WotC and Paizo for their views on people.
 

Count_Zero

Game Master
Validated User
I know it was a different time. This was back when D&D was still recovering from the satanic panic of the '80s, so it was easier for them to avoid tacking on the queer agenda on top of that. It made me rather bitter that they would go out of their way to not even acknowledge homosexuality in their games. Pretty much, I imagine most of the fan base they were trying to appeal to was of the "I don't want politics in my games" mentality. I honestly don't even know if the movers and shakers of the RPGA were homophobic. Maybe they weren't; they just didn't want to lose customers.
I suspect the directive was more "If Lorraine Williams sees D&D on Sixty Minutes again, heads will roll!"
 

macd21

Registered User
Validated User
I know it was a different time. This was back when D&D was still recovering from the satanic panic of the '80s, so it was easier for them to avoid tacking on the queer agenda on top of that. It made me rather bitter that they would go out of their way to not even acknowledge homosexuality in their games. Pretty much, I imagine most of the fan base they were trying to appeal to was of the "I don't want politics in my games" mentality.
I don’t think it was so much ‘keep politics out of RPGs,’ because in some ways the emergence of that attitude reflected an improvement of the situation over that of the nineties. Including queer representation wouldn’t have been seen as political, it would have been seen as sensationalist, as TSR trying to be edgy and attention seeking.
 

Numanoid

#rocksteadyrollhard
Validated User
I think this article gives WotC and corporate D&D far too much credit.

The embrace of LGBTQ players by 5e D&D is meaningless when some of its primary consultants and former consultants are known as some of the most misogynist, homophobic and transphobic voices in the RPG industry.
 
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Deadstop

Active member
Validated User
I think this article gives WotC and corporate D&D far too much credit.

The embrace of LGBTQ players by 5e D&D is meaningless when some of its primary consultants and former consultants are known as some of the most misogynist, homophobic and transphobic voices in the RPG industry.
Very much former, I think. It wasn’t a good look and they defended the choice far too long, but I don’t think any of those attitudes made their way into the products themselves.
 
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