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🎨 Creative August Painting Thread

Montegris

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Previous thread here.

So I finally finished my giant. Pretty much everything but metallics is Contrast paints. I'm very, very pleased with the results, more so given that it took me 6-8 hours of work in total to have him painted.

Spoiler: Show






Given that this big guy has sat in my shelves unpainted for maybe 6 or 7 years, I'm quite happy that Contrast are motivating me to paint more :)
 

Arethusa

Sophipygian
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The comtrast paints do seem to be spurring a lot of people on.

Nice work! Good and grotesque.
 

BrianDR

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I wanted to play with the contrast paints, but I already had a "recipe" on the goblins I was painting and wanted to keep it consistent, so I picked another army to experiment with. Demons of Tzeentch seemed like a good fit, and a good chance to play with some of the brighter colors on offer:




I also started in on some of my endless spells, this one done with non-contrast paints:

 

Scutarii

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The comtrast paints do seem to be spurring a lot of people on.

Nice work! Good and grotesque.
Yeah, whatever anyone might say about getting better results with other paints or being able to mix and make your own equivalents with artists inks and flow improver the combination of having a big player in the market space saying 'you are allowed to put in minimum effort for maximum reward and it's fine' as a psychological thing AND having a range of paints with a consistent set of names to use in discussion AND you can just grab them in the store is a big positive.

Varanguard of Tzeentch!



The finished unit.

Exquisite :)
 

Deflare

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Yeah, whatever anyone might say about getting better results with other paints or being able to mix and make your own equivalents with artists inks and flow improver the combination of having a big player in the market space saying 'you are allowed to put in minimum effort for maximum reward and it's fine' as a psychological thing AND having a range of paints with a consistent set of names to use in discussion AND you can just grab them in the store is a big positive.
Yeah, that's where I tend to fall on the "you can make your own!" arguments. Like, yeah, given some dish soap and some basic red/yellow/blue paints, you can theoretically make any combination of colors (you probably need black and white, too, now that I think of it), including your own glazes that act a lot like Contrast. But that all takes focus and effort, and it's worth $8 for me not to have to jump through those hoops and just have the pot of paint on my desk, ready to use, and know it'll be the same color every time.

They also mix great with other painting methods. I've been getting a fair number of models done with a mix of traditional paints and pots of Contrast, and I like the effects I've been getting. Whatever whining people want to do about getting charged "too much money for a simple paint" isn't worth crap compared to me getting good results from my stuff.
 

Arethusa

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You should never mix dish soap with your paint.

It will make it water-soluble and leave it vulnerable to rinsing off or rubbing off later.

(And sorry, but your basic red, yellow, and blue are neither efficient nor, in some cases, even capable of actually mixing a sufficient range of colors, not even if you add in black and white. Color mixing is a way more nuanced art than people are taught to think it is.)

***

I don’t see much point in trying to recreate the contrast paints at home. It’s an awfully fiddly job.

Normally I’m one of those solidly in the “They charge way too much for that stuff and you can mix your own” camp. But this contrast paint, finally, seems to be something you can’t mix easily on your own for cheaper, and it does its job in its particular niche very well.

Its particular niche is the rapid painting using simple tools and methods of specifically GW and GW-type plastic minis which have a particular house style of densely packed and deeply incised detail where the desired result is to emphasize the sculpt with colorful contrast to look good on the tabletop level relatively quickly.

It’s a very big niche.
 

Montegris

Mostly lurking
Validated User
You should never mix dish soap with your paint.

It will make it water-soluble and leave it vulnerable to rinsing off or rubbing off later.

(And sorry, but your basic red, yellow, and blue are neither efficient nor, in some cases, even capable of actually mixing a sufficient range of colors, not even if you add in black and white. Color mixing is a way more nuanced art than people are taught to think it is.)

***

I don’t see much point in trying to recreate the contrast paints at home. It’s an awfully fiddly job.

Normally I’m one of those solidly in the “They charge way too much for that stuff and you can mix your own” camp. But this contrast paint, finally, seems to be something you can’t mix easily on your own for cheaper, and it does its job in its particular niche very well.

Its particular niche is the rapid painting using simple tools and methods of specifically GW and GW-type plastic minis which have a particular house style of densely packed and deeply incised detail where the desired result is to emphasize the sculpt with colorful contrast to look good on the tabletop level relatively quickly.

It’s a very big niche.
Yep. I've said it before. I wouldn't use contrast for everything, but they do what they're designed to do amazingly well. I think that part of the issue is the rethoric of "GW paints and hobby supplies are overpriced garbage" that people love to buy into. This rethoric is only accurate for certain products, but contrast isn't one of them.
 

Arethusa

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Yep. I've said it before. I wouldn't use contrast for everything, but they do what they're designed to do amazingly well. I think that part of the issue is the rethoric of "GW paints and hobby supplies are overpriced garbage" that people love to buy into. This rethoric is only accurate for certain products, but contrast isn't one of them.
Pfft. I'm a fine artist by profession. GW products are perfectly decent quality. (Except for those paint pots which seem designed to dry out if looked at cross-eyed.)

They are, however, very expensive for what you get. And I do not appreciate their taking perfectly ordinary art supplies and rebranding them with a confusing name. (I'm looking at you, "liquid green stuff" a.k.a. perfectly ordinary "acrylic molding paste" colored green and sold for twenty times the price.)
 
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