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🎨 Creative August Painting Thread

DrunkenGrognard

Exile to the godforsaken reaches of the North
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That Banelord looks amazing! My compliments, and I can't wait to see it finished
 

Deflare

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Does anyone have any tips for painting smooth metallics? I don't have any trouble with small details like swords or trim, but when I go to paint a large flat area (say, painting shield solid silver) I often get brushstrokes in a way that I don't with other colors. Which I'm assuming has something to do with the distribution of the little metallic particles in the paint.
I generally go with drybrushing, which means I often do metallics as an early step; applying the metallics as a drybrush, in my experience, helps make them a lot more even.

Ironically, this works a bit better with thicker paints--I've had better luck using Citadel metallics than Reaper's, for example, even though I use Reaper paints for most things.
 

Egyptian

21st Century Digital Boy
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Tonight I started experimenting with oils, after watching some model making videos recommending the technique. Nothing to show you quite yet, but pictures of the finished experiment will come in a day or two. So far I've learned three lessons.

One-no matter what you did, you can always add more thinner and fix it. That 24 hour curing time is really forgiving to someone used to working with water-based acrylics.

Two-However much paint you have on your brush, it's probably way way too much. Again, I've only worked with acrylic paint in the past, and that will not prepare you for the amount of pigment found in even cheap oil paints like I'm using. (Winsor & Newton 'Winton' if anyone is curious.)

Three-There's no reason to be afraid of thinners. I bought a fairly cheap Mona Lisa-brand odorless thinner, and honestly I couldn't smell anything.
 

Asmodai

Warrior Kobold
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A pretty basic job on some Mechanicus terrain to match my existing set from Shadow War Armageddon.



Spoiler: Show





 

Arethusa

Sophipygian
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Tonight I started experimenting with oils, after watching some model making videos recommending the technique. Nothing to show you quite yet, but pictures of the finished experiment will come in a day or two. So far I've learned three lessons.

One-no matter what you did, you can always add more thinner and fix it. That 24 hour curing time is really forgiving to someone used to working with water-based acrylics.

Two-However much paint you have on your brush, it's probably way way too much. Again, I've only worked with acrylic paint in the past, and that will not prepare you for the amount of pigment found in even cheap oil paints like I'm using. (Winsor & Newton 'Winton' if anyone is curious.)

Three-There's no reason to be afraid of thinners. I bought a fairly cheap Mona Lisa-brand odorless thinner, and honestly I couldn't smell anything.
You still don't want to breathe that stuff if you can avoid it. Ventilation is your friend.

Acrylic paints have always seemed to be a little more translucent / have a little less pigmentation than oil paints, in my experience.

Looking forward to seeing your results!
 

Egyptian

21st Century Digital Boy
Validated User
You still don't want to breathe that stuff if you can avoid it. Ventilation is your friend.

Acrylic paints have always seemed to be a little more translucent / have a little less pigmentation than oil paints, in my experience.

Looking forward to seeing your results!
Right. I mean, I wasn't sitting there huffing it for twenty minutes or anything. Just opening a can of turpentine can bring tears to your eyes-this stuff has less of a scent than some acrylic paints. I work in my living room, which is about 12'x16', and I run the fan while I paint. If that's not well ventilated enough I don't know what would be.
 

Arethusa

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Right. I mean, I wasn't sitting there huffing it for twenty minutes or anything. Just opening a can of turpentine can bring tears to your eyes-this stuff has less of a scent than some acrylic paints. I work in my living room, which is about 12'x16', and I run the fan while I paint. If that's not well ventilated enough I don't know what would be.
A fan and windows open is usually okay.
 

Arethusa

Sophipygian
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(I kind of like working with turpentine. Firstly, it is a more effective solvent than other thinners. The odorless spirits can’t easily deal with things like damar varnish or beeswax - although it’s fine for oil paint. Secondly, I paint with serious organic filter masks and being able to catch a whiff of the turpentine is sometimes my first clue that the filter needs changing.)
 
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