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[BattleTech/Cthulhutech/Eclipse Phase/Shadowrun] CGL Might End [Irwin x1]

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Jason MH

Registered User
Validated User
No, that means 1) the real world doesn't move as fast as the internet, and 2) you don't cut checks until you know for sure what checks you can cut.
Well said, with the addition of 3) Checks do not travel from checkwriter to recipient instantaneously. In most cases, mail is required.

Jason H.
 

Harrier

Texas Geezer
Well said, with the addition of 3) Checks do not travel from checkwriter to recipient instantaneously. In most cases, mail is required.

Jason H.
See point 1, but thanks, Jason :) I'm not a big forumite, but I'm a big Shadowrun fan, and hope this shakes out okay for you.
 

Jason MH

Registered User
Validated User
I really hate to do two posts in a row in a thread, but I just got a statement from Catalyst management about the ICV2.com story, so I thought it should be shared here. The statement follows in its entirety:

>>>
In Response To ICV2.com’s News Item, 03/19/2010 09:34pm

ICV2 is a great website that rapidly compiles information across the width and breadth of the gaming industry, as it occurs, and tries to provide a single source for all such news. However, there recent report contained some factual inaccuracies.

First, there has been no halt to sales of any CthulhuTech products. We’re are in negotiations with our friends at WildFire for how best to move forward, ensuring this great book line continues to grow. As such, neither Catalyst Game Labs, nor WildFire, have put a stop to any books from being sold.

Second, the stoppage of a small, select list of Shadowrun books has nothing to do with the license for Shadowrun, which Catalyst still holds. Instead, the halt to sales is due to on going negotiations between Catalyst and its freelancers. We’re moving quickly and thoroughly to resolve this situation to mutual satisfaction, so the community can have access to these great Shadowrun books in short order once more.
>>>

Jason H.
 

Cain

New member
Banned
Yes, I'm Shadowrun Line Developer. Still. Jennifer and Adam had been acting in a development capacity before I came on board, but when I did Jennifer moved into accounting and Adam into layout. So since late last summer I have been primarily responsible for developer duties.

Jason H.
Okay; but that doesn't change the fact that both Adam and Jennifer did a lot of Shadowrun development, and losing them hurts the Shadowrun line.

Basically, what I'm getting at is this: what exactly happened to them? They weren't fired, but rather they were officially "let go" or laid off is still up in the air. Is there a gag order on them? E.g., "Don't spread bad news or we'll give you a bad reference" type of deal going on? And, as the line developer, would you personally rehire them if the choice were up to you?
 

Fabius Maximus

Registered User
Validated User
Okay; but that doesn't change the fact that both Adam and Jennifer did a lot of Shadowrun development, and losing them hurts the Shadowrun line.

Basically, what I'm getting at is this: what exactly happened to them? They weren't fired, but rather they were officially "let go" or laid off is still up in the air. Is there a gag order on them? E.g., "Don't spread bad news or we'll give you a bad reference" type of deal going on? And, as the line developer, would you personally rehire them if the choice were up to you?
To be blunt, if a person in any position of authority answered you in any category other than "I cannot answer that question" it would be a HUGE red flag to any future potential employees.

Also:
And, as the line developer, would you personally rehire them if the choice were up to you?
Is very likely legally actionable. You can't seperate out "line editor" and "personally." If he said "Yes, but." then you could make a very good case for it harming their future ability to get work. If he said: YES! and they WERE let go, it could cause problems in other areas.

No professional buiseness would every, ever answer questions like this, not simply on an internet, but in many cases not even to another potential employer who was asking.
 

FrankTrollman

Retired User
But they are answerable questions. They quit because of non-payment of contracts and the very high apparent probability of contracted money never being delivered. Then outstanding contracts were called in and now Catalyst can't distribute a bunch of books until those contracts are paid.

Catalyst management currently says that they are "in negotiation" with the freelancers. But the freelancers haven't received any money, and they haven't been contacted to tell them that they are going to get any money. So who exactly they are in negotiation with is pretty open to interpretation.

-Frank
 

Stahlseele

Retired User
Now one of the more unwelcome questions:
Exactly how much of the core team that basically made up shadowrun(freelancers, jenni, adam etc.) is left?
 

Fabius Maximus

Registered User
Validated User
Not quite true. I hesitate to use a criminal law analogy but the basic principle is the same. Someone robs a car dealership. Turns around and sells you the car. In the eyes of the law you are not free and clear to resell the car to someone else. It is still stolen property and when the police come to pick it up they don't pay you for it.

What this means is that these shops and distributors are vulnerable to being sent similar C&D letters. Their recourse is then to pursue CGL to recover their money.
This is incorrect.

it is not first, of the the case of a stolen item, which is handled by different laws, most notably the difference between criminal and civil law. In this csae, once the books have been sold to the shops, those shops are clear title holders to the books-- the writers have no recourse to stop them from selling them. this is handled, and is quite clearly handled under the first sale doctirne, which applies to both companies and individuals.

Now, selling books after this dispute arose exposes the publisher/I] to liability but not the distributors or individual resellors.
If the company ceases to exist tomorrow, and i have a pile of shadowrun books that I bought, I can sell them quite legally-- the fraud, (to use an example) would be on the part of hte company and the company officers.

Again, this is a far different matter than purchasing stolen goods, which are governed by different statues. For a gaming related issue, note that wyhlie Dangerous Journey's eventually ceased publication by the actions of TSR, it had no impact on copies already in stores.
 

Dwight

Unregistered User
I'm pretty sure things get murkier in the middle. There have been situations where books have been recalled, stickers sent out to 'fix' books, and stuff like that to appease copyright disagreements.

The rub comes in trying to assert claims. It becomes increasingly infeasible (unless there is some really strong infrastructure in place, like with that Amazon Kindle situation relatively recently)
 
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