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Best Chase Scene Mechanics

Walla Walla

Active member
Validated User
You know, I've enjoyed the chase mechanics in nWoD.

But then, I like alot about the new Storyteller system, even if I can't stand the setting.
 

Old Scratch

Registered User
Validated User
Again, could I emphasize that perhaps people could go into some detail about the mechanics.

I mean, it's great and all that people are noting that Game X has chase mechanics, but it would be nice to also describe in brief what these mechanics are like...
 

Bipolar Bear

The Saddest/Happiest Bear
Validated User
How many of these have something more than an opposed "I want to get away" vs. "You want to catch me" mechanic? Having recently seen The Transporter and Ronin, I want something that makes chases as fun and cool as a fight scene, and "just roll this" is a little lacking.
 

BigPapaD

Pork Chop Sandwiches!
Bipolar Bear said:
How many of these have something more than an opposed "I want to get away" vs. "You want to catch me" mechanic? Having recently seen The Transporter and Ronin, I want something that makes chases as fun and cool as a fight scene, and "just roll this" is a little lacking.
I'm not really sure how much more you can get out of a chase scene than 'I want to get away'/'I want to catch them'... That IS what a chase sequence is all about. I suppose there are slight variations (like getting to a place before the other person or get to a place before an event takes place there.) Building on the essence of the chase is up to you. There are a number of things you can add to a chase: what if the chaser starts ramming the chasee? Or the chasee starts dropping grenades? what obstacles crop up? (like a raised bridge or a one way street, pedestrians, those street markets in Chinatown or those planks that some guy leant against the dumpster that makes cars flip up onto two wheels all the time...)

Whatever you choose to throw into a chase, sooner or later it'll come down to the dice. A good system should make multiple successes necessary and allow for complications as characters respond to the various hazards you throw at them.
 

Future Villain Band

Super Moderator
Moderator
Validated User
Old Scratch,
You sig is in violation of our rules. Six lines of normal sized text, including spaces, or eight lines of our smallest text, including spaces. Please fix that.

Thanks,

--Eric
 

PTiKachu

Damaramu will regret this
Validated User
As mentioned before, Feng Shui and Unknown Armies have great chase systems. Not surprisingly, both are designed by Greg Stolze, and are similar in that they both involve both sides attempting to increase or reduce the distance between the vehicles by accumulating Drive skill successes from round to round, all the while with shooting and other combat actions being attempted by various crew in each vehicle. Feng Shui's is more complex because it has stunting and a catalog of vehicle stats for everything from horses to antigravity aircraft carriers.

I personally like the system of accumulating skill successes to increase/reduce vehicle distance, with an upper range limit indicating that a vehicle has escaped. That is my golden standard for chase systems.

Do some of the other systems mentioned here follow the same basic structure?
 

Orsino

Inveterate Layabout
Validated User
Spycraft 2.0's DC system involves accumulating Lead, where Lead 0 represents predator defeating prey, and Lead 10 represents the prey escaping or otherwise defeating the predator. In a foot chase this is straightforward, but still works in an interrogation, or seduction. Each round both sides select a Strategy. Some strategies can be used by both sides, some are only appropriate for predator or prey. The Strategy chosen affects the roll to succeed, and if successful provides one or more Advantages. These Advantages can affect the Lead, provide a bonus to attack or defense, or provoke a crisis that forces everyone to make a successful roll or be out of the chase.

Probably clear as mud. The guys at Crafty Games explain it better.
 

Phantom Stranger

Welcome to Casablanca
Validated User
Yeah, Spycraft breaks down as follows:

There are Prey-only strategies, Predator-only strategies, and general strategies. Some are only accessible to characters with better vehicles, though a Wheelman can coax more out of his machine than anyone else.

Strategies have varying skill modifiers and varying advantages to be won if you win the roll-off. While you can attempt to reduce Lead to zero or increase it to ten to win, there are a lot of other options.

Last chase I was in (in Gallowglass on the PbP forum) I ended up breaking their nerve through choice of the Stress advantage (leading them up a single-lane road the wrong way down the one way system, driving through clubland at high speed at kicking-out time) before they forced a Crisis (herding me into an area where a dumpster stuck out across half the road) which I avoided and they didn't, meaning they ended up crashing into the dumpster at 60MPH, and took themselves out of the race.

There are a lot of strategies, including the option to reverse the chase, going from the pursued to the pursuer (switch) and, in the right campaigns and providing you have someone with the Daredevil feat, stunts.
 

shockvalue

The Puncher Strikes!
Validated User
Phantom Stranger said:
Yeah, Spycraft breaks down as follows:

There are Prey-only strategies, Predator-only strategies, and general strategies. Some are only accessible to characters with better vehicles, though a Wheelman can coax more out of his machine than anyone else.

Strategies have varying skill modifiers and varying advantages to be won if you win the roll-off. While you can attempt to reduce Lead to zero or increase it to ten to win, there are a lot of other options.

Last chase I was in (in Gallowglass on the PbP forum) I ended up breaking their nerve through choice of the Stress advantage (leading them up a single-lane road the wrong way down the one way system, driving through clubland at high speed at kicking-out time) before they forced a Crisis (herding me into an area where a dumpster stuck out across half the road) which I avoided and they didn't, meaning they ended up crashing into the dumpster at 60MPH, and took themselves out of the race.

There are a lot of strategies, including the option to reverse the chase, going from the pursued to the pursuer (switch) and, in the right campaigns and providing you have someone with the Daredevil feat, stunts.
Okay. I'm impressed. Spycraft always sounded far too crunchy for my tastes, but I just might pick it up some day just to crib the chase rules for another system (probably Savage Worlds).
 

Phantom Stranger

Welcome to Casablanca
Validated User
shockvalue said:
Okay. I'm impressed. Spycraft always sounded far too crunchy for my tastes, but I just might pick it up some day just to crib the chase rules for another system (probably Savage Worlds).
The same system's used for a whole bunch of other things - seductions, hacking, brainwashing... anything that shouldn't be just one dice roll but could potentially mean the GM's only working with one player for quite some time, really.
 
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