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Best Mechanics to Steal from Non-D&D Games

Yakk

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Exactly; PbtA (like Dungeon World) games already have it knit into the mechanics of the game.

Hooking that into D&D or another game either requires some new mechanics, or using DW mechanics in D&D.
 

Daz Florp Lebam

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Exactly; PbtA (like Dungeon World) games already have it knit into the mechanics of the game.

Hooking that into D&D or another game either requires some new mechanics, or using DW mechanics in D&D.
You could probably latch something like that onto 5E's Background traits and go from there.
 

Unka Josh

Social Justice Chimera
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FWIW, Swordbearer did abstract wealth before White Wolf touched it, and in a fantasy game, no less! It specifically tracked it in regard to Social Status, which was a nice setup-- if you wear rags and talk like a peasant, no one will believe that you have a right to that jeweled dagger. No one.
 

DeathbyDoughnut

a.k.a. Mr. Meat Popcicle
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I pulled the ideas of minions from various places, but I think it's M&M 3e that is my primary inspiration. Instead of doing the "Minions have 1 hp" thing from 4e, I use "minions are out after one successful hit." it's less of a disconnect for my brain than something having 1 hp, even though it's effectively the same.

I've tried popcorn initiatives with various groups in different systems. I love the concept of players picking who gets to go next. Conceptually it adds more tactics to combat. But in my experience all it does is slow the game down. Either everyone jumps to go at the same time on every initiative turn and there is a five minute discussion about who should go. Or no one volunteers to go and everyone sits around for five minutes quietly waiting for someone else to go, then someone decides to go and after their turn asks "who wants to go next?" and again everyone sits around quietly for a couple minutes waiting for someone else to volunteer. So I decided that popcorn initiatives are a bad fit for my groups.

All I need from an initiative system is to inform the table who is going when, and then get out of the way. If it slows the game down more than that then it's actively in my way keeping me from running the game smoothly. One concept I've been testing is that surprised characters and creatures don't get to roll initiative at all, they just go on their dex score as their initiative.
 

RobertEdwards

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Thanks to the OP for an interesting topic, and to all that participate. I am learning much and hope to incorporate several things into future games.
 

RLF

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I've been meaning to put Mouse Guard's system for modelling seasons and weather to work for my next F20 game. It's an aspect that I've been ignoring or handwaving, but one that could add a little more depth to the world. One idea that I'm playing with is to modify the system to reflect slow yearly changes caused by the weather wizard/necromancer/awakening eldritch horror as the evil plan moves forward.
 

Yakk

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Mooks in D&D, which I first think I saw in Wushu.

Take minor foes and pool their HP (or "defeat points"). Keep track of the HP per mook.

Damage is pooled. Max damage per target is equal to HP per mook. Every HP of a mook's damage, a mook dies.

So if you have 20 mooks, each with 20 HP, they have a 400 HP pool. Earlier a melee attack did 18 points of damage.

0 mooks are dead.

If a fireball dealing 35 damage (17 on a save) hits 5 of them, and 2 save, they take 20*3=60 (capped damage from no-save) + 17*2=34 damage, for a total of 94 damage.

18+94 = 122. So 6 mooks are dead (6*20=120), and there is 2 damage left over.

Much less pain than keeping track of each mooks HP individually.

You similarly simplify their damage. If the non-mook did 1d8+5 damage, the mook deals 10 per hit flat. When they attack, you roll the d20s and just count hits, then apply damage.

With a bit of rounding (on HP totals) you can keep the math simple and quick, and enable handling medium sized swarms of low threat creatures without jagged edges (like minion mechanics, where every hit kills a minion).
 

Kuildeous

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Ah yes, initiative. One thing I briefly saw that strikes me as beautiful is FFG's Star Wars. As I understand it, everyone rolls their initiative, and slots are allocated for PCs and NPCs. The players can choose who gets to go in each slot.

I feel this would be a great addition to D&D. It still makes the fast rogue desirable because it helps the group. Say the rogue rolls a 27 on initiative, but the NPCs rolled a 24. If the rogue actually goes up to get sneak attack, then he's gonna get screwed by the villains when they go. Instead, the rogue gives his initiative to the big fighter or the artillery wizard. Allows for more tactics and makes things a little less reliant on luck.
 

Fenris-77

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I think I prefer the more cinematic 1 hit 1 kill cinematic method for mooks, but to each his own. You fireball hit 12 mooks. They're dead. yay!It does get cumbersome whenn you're talking about unit sized conflict and up of course,
 

Yakk

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I think I prefer the more cinematic 1 hit 1 kill cinematic method for mooks, but to each his own. You fireball hit 12 mooks. They're dead. yay!It does get cumbersome whenn you're talking about unit sized conflict and up of course,
Fair enough.

The corner cases -- like "your spell deals 2 damage to everyone within 100'" -- are one thing Mooks does better than Minions.

In the limit -- the fireball damage is 50 you say? Minions and Mooks work the same. At the edge, Mooks are smoother; they devolve to 2-hit or 3-hit Minions continuously. And Mook vs Mook works (with different strength Mooks actually being different), while Minion vs Minion is ridiculous.

This all probably matters more in a game where "normal creatures" can be reduced to being Mooked by being out-leveled.
 
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