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wirecrossing

illegal jokes
Validated User
I am a noob when it comes to OSR stuff. I have Whitehack, Swords and Wizardry Whitebox, Red and Pleasant Land and Yoon-Suin.

What I like about these products is that they place you in a time and context that you can be nostalgic for even if you did not live it. There is a magical quality to the writing and layout of all these things that is very immersive in a way I cannot quite put my finger on.

Anything else to look out for?
 

Flexi

The Solitary Knight
Validated User
Deep Carbon Observatory - probably the closest thing to poetry I've seen in an OSR product. The loopy love child of Heart of Darkness and D&D flowing down an odd, serpentine journey that gets stranger and stranger. Majestically weird.

ASE 1 &2 - Like Beneath the Planet of the Apes on acid. And nothing to do with the Simpson's version or the Marky Mark abomination. Well, maybe the former.......
Funny, deadly, curiouser and curiouser.

Some of the new DCC adventures have a wonderful old skool feel like Intrigue at the Court of Chaos or Sailors on the Starless Sea, especially the former where you get dumped right into the war between Law & Chaos at level 1.

Stonehell - well designed and very practical megadungeon. Very user friendly.

+1 for ACK. Makes me remember my times with BECMI/RC rules for taking your characters to a higher level and ruling dominions.
 
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Ancalagon

Registered User
Validated User
I must admit I'm not very familiar with the OSR. My only exposure so far to it has been Yoon-Suin, and I've been *blown away* by how evocative it is. I desperately want to run a campaign in it, although it will be in 5e.

I think in general great writing and adventure design is somewhat system agnostic.
 

Exeter

Registered User
Validated User
There's a lot of great stuff out there. Some of my favorites are Castles & Crusades, Dark Dungeons, Basic Fantasy RPG, and the Microlite games. I also like Adventures Dark & Deep and Champions of Zed, both of these not so much for the games themselves, but as sources of old school inspiration.
 

Zounds!

Frog of Paradise
Validated User
In addition to what's already been mentioned, check out Slumbering Ursine Dunes (a 'pointcrawl' adventure set in a Slavic fantasy setting with evil space elves) and Fire on the Velvet Horizon (an exceptional book of monsters by the creators of Deep Carbon Observatory, not available in pdf). Vornheim is the spiritual predecessor to Red and Pleasant Land, and well worth a look. If you don't mind some fairly extreme horror elements, I can also recommend Lamentations of the Flame Princess in general, especially Qelong, Death Frost Doom, Better Than Any Man, and Scenic Dunnsmouth.

(Alternatively, you could just randomly read stuff from the archives of False Machine and Goblin Punch. Arnold and Patrick both regularly come up with better material in throwaway blog posts than most mainstream RPGs manage in their flagship products.)
 

Lukas Sjöström

Society of Unity scholar
Validated User
Beyond the Wall and Other Adventures has a really nice character generation system. On the downloads page you can find "Beyond the Cave", which gives you an example of how the playbook system works for generating a character with a backstory that ties them to the adventuring location and the other PCs, although that specific example is also fairly unusual in that it lets you play a bear.
 

Crusty One

Registered User
Validated User
I love Kevin Crawford's stuff, particularly Red Tide, An Echo Resounding and The Crimson Pandect, all of which were written for Labyrinth Lord. If you're at all interested in running a sandbox game, the first two books are well worth a look.

All of Kevin's stuff is great though.
 

wirecrossing

illegal jokes
Validated User
I love Kevin Crawford's stuff, particularly Red Tide, An Echo Resounding and The Crimson Pandect, all of which were written for Labyrinth Lord. If you're at all interested in running a sandbox game, the first two books are well worth a look.

All of Kevin's stuff is great though.
Oh, I love Kevin's stuff. Didn't know he did any of this kind of stuff.
 
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