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Biggest miniatures game ever? 20,000 minis, 100 players

AegonTheUnready

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A friend inthe UK forwarded this to me
Team of 120 military enthusiasts and gamers replay the Battle of Waterloo with more than 20,000 miniature soldiers in the biggest ever historical table top war game
  • Military enthusiasts replay the Battle of Waterloo using a map measuring more than 2,000 square feet
  • Every single battalion, regiment and battery which took part in the real Battle of Waterloo was represented
  • More than 20,000 miniature soldiers were painted to make the biggest ever historical table top war game
  • A British led-Army alongside Dutch, German and Prussian forces beat French Napoleon in the real life battle
PUBLISHED: 14:34 EDT, 16 June 2019 | UPDATED: 15:35 EDT, 16 June 2019
Military enthusiasts and more than 100 gamers have taken part in the biggest ever historical table top war game - with more than 20,000 miniature soldiers.

The team at the University of Glasgow have replayed the Battle of Waterloo using a gigantic historical map measuring 2,066 square feet.

The 28mm figures, representing every battalion, regiment and battery which took part in the real Battle of Waterloo, were painted over the last year by wargaming enthusiasts, veterans' groups, students, and members of the public.

The Great Game: Waterloo Replayed is a one-off charity event which recreated the Belgium battlefield of 1815 in aid of Waterloo Uncovered - a charity for military veterans. They have been investigating the archaeology of the Waterloo battlefield since 2015.

The charity used a team of professional archaeologists including Professor Tony Pollard from the University of Glasgow.
The battle map includes model villages, walls and trees all made in intricate detail.
A couple pictures






Sometimes I really wish I lived in the UK :D

source
 

Nate_MI

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The UK does seem to have some truly stupendously large wargaming moments. I don't know if it's because there are a big companies like GW and Mantic Games headquartered there or if there's some cultural component. Regardless, this looks like a fun event and I'll look forward to seeing the commentary once its over.
 

Grumpygoat

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The UK does seem to have some truly stupendously large wargaming moments. I don't know if it's because there are a big companies like GW and Mantic Games headquartered there or if there's some cultural component. Regardless, this looks like a fun event and I'll look forward to seeing the commentary once its over.
Probably some cultural components play into it, but population density may be another one: the US has a population density of about 92 people per square mile. The UK has a population density of about 365 people per square kilometer. That and I understand there's a more robust rail system. I suspect it's much easier to find people with your interests living nearby.
 

Gideon

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Probably some cultural components play into it, but population density may be another one: the US has a population density of about 92 people per square mile. The UK has a population density of about 365 people per square kilometer. That and I understand there's a more robust rail system. I suspect it's much easier to find people with your interests living nearby.
Otoh, my city has 7 wargames clubs (that I know of) and has a population of about a million. If you lived in the NY, LA, or Chicago, etc, you wouldn't really have to worry about the population density of the entire country.
 

Grumpygoat

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Otoh, my city has 7 wargames clubs (that I know of) and has a population of about a million. If you lived in the NY, LA, or Chicago, etc, you wouldn't really have to worry about the population density of the entire country.
There's still probably greater population density where you live, and likely better public transit. Not that I think those are the only factors; I know Boston has a few places that do good enough historical wargaming business to stock minis for it (I don't play, just have vague enough interest to pop into a thread about it), but presumably not to the degree that draws massive, 100 player recreations. Just that it's likely a factor.
 

durecellrabbit

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The historical scene is pretty dedicated despite its small size. Quite a lot of players will attend events around the country and some will go overseas to events in Europe. This event had basically every Napoleonic player I know wanting to attend.

The US does/did (Not sure what 4th ed did) have its dedicated fans for Flames of War.
 
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