• The Infractions Forum is available for public view. Please note that if you have been suspended you will need to open a private/incognito browser window to view it.

Biggest Supposed Discontinuities in Sci-Fi Franchises (no defenses!)

Greg 1

Some Guy
Validated User
Sometimes, franchises are accused, rightly or wrongly, of contradicting themselves. In extreme cases, this can lead people to complain that it's not really the same universe, show, or character any more.

Changes in emphasis or tone (more whackiness or drama for instance) can also lead to complaints that the universe or show isn't the same universe or show anymore, even if there is no direct contradiction.

Or the universe, show or character can just change so much that some folk think it isn't the same universe, show or character anymore.

What would you say are the biggest such supposed discontinuities in sci-fi franchises?

Please do not defend a franchise against charges of discontinuity. For the purposes of this thead, I don't care if the accusations are true. I just want to know what the accusations are.
 

DarkStarling

Brilliantly Crazed
Validated User
Plenty of people seem convinced that the different marvel tv shows are all in their own pocket universes or, at best, clusters.

I’ve also heard discussions of having Trek movies (even pre-abrams) in the canon alternate dimensions whenever convenient.
 

Blizzardborn

Hiding in a snowdrift
Validated User
Heck, you could do that with most of the Trek episodes, given how often they forget tech tricks or need to relearn the same lesson.
 

AbjectQuestioner

Low SAN Score
Validated User
My major issue with the X-Men - the reason I ultimately dropped reading any of the comics - is how constantly Prof. X has been interpreted and re-interpreted over the years by multiple writers. He started off as a fairly beneficent figure, the wise old mentor to the teenage mutants he had under his wing. Then he became a mutant version of Martin Luther King, Jr., the advocate of human-mutant good relations. Then he became a Machiavellian conspirator, planting agents like Sage into the Hellfire Club years before the team had any contact with that group. And he kept changing . . . mentor, Ghandi, telepathic devil . . . over and over.

The movies . . . ha ha, the movies with their twisted timeline(s) only showcase the problems of X-Men continuity, or lack thereof.
 

4th of Eleven

Active member
Validated User
Stargate SG1 was always kind of weird in how it handled the original movie - they referenced the movie's events a lot, especially early on, but changed so many details that it was effectively its own continuity.
 

Tyrmatfrage

Registered User
Validated User
Plenty of people seem convinced that the different marvel tv shows are all in their own pocket universes or, at best, clusters.
In the case of Agents of SHIELD... I'd actually prefer it if they'd go ahead and just outright say they're in a separate continuity from the movies (and events in the previous season could be used to justify it too!) as that would probably give them more storytelling freedom than being beholden to the MCU canon. At this point the MCU canon is holding them back, IMO.
 

Eric the .5b

Hail the Milleni-odel!
Validated User
Star Trek V is pretty widely considered just plain out of continuity.

An old joke among fans of the movie Highlander was that there was only one. The sequel's "Wait, suddenly they're aliens who had a life on another planet/lived in the prehistoric past?" was kind of a deal-breaker compared to the straightforward historical fantasy of the first movie. Later sequels hewed back toward the movie and the series, but just weren't very good.

A lot of TV shows that had major or complete changes in writing staff got this. Fans of Airwolf generally don't "count" the fourth season, where USA Network bought it, replaced everyone in the cast, and, due to almost no budget, relied on existing footage for every helicopter shot. Likewise, fans of Gargoyles pretty much blew off The Goliath Chronicles.

In Marvel comics, people have observed that the mutant comics, while theoretically part of the same setting, often seem to depict a rather different world from where the non-mutant titles take place. One where, among other things, the Canadian government is really, really evil, and nobody outside the X-teams shows up to help stop people from trying to wipe out mutants or the human race every other Thursday.

Some people reject all Alien movies after Aliens, since they shifted the setting into the future and invalidated the rather neat comic continuity that Dark Horse had built up around the first two movies. (Also, they killed off all the other characters Ripley worked so hard to save...)
 

mpswaim

Emo Dad
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Stargate SG1 was always kind of weird in how it handled the original movie - they referenced the movie's events a lot, especially early on, but changed so many details that it was effectively its own continuity.
Also the movie guys hated the TV continuity. The books follow the Movie continuity.

With Robotech, the books are officially out of continuity with whatever Harmony Gold's been doing over the past 20 years.

And going to Robotech source material, some of the Macross media are considered fiction in universe. I'm not sure how you'd count that.
 

DarkStarling

Brilliantly Crazed
Validated User
The Buffy and Angel comics, possibly including Fray.

Not sci-fi but for some The West Wing ends after season 4.

Star Trek V is pretty widely considered just plain out of continuity.

An old joke among fans of the movie Highlander was that there was only one. The sequel's "Wait, suddenly they're aliens who had a life on another planet/lived in the prehistoric past?" was kind of a deal-breaker compared to the straightforward historical fantasy of the first movie. Later sequels hewed back toward the movie and the series, but just weren't very good.

A lot of TV shows that had major or complete changes in writing staff got this. Fans of Airwolf generally don't "count" the fourth season, where USA Network bought it, replaced everyone in the cast, and, due to almost no budget, relied on existing footage for every helicopter shot. Likewise, fans of Gargoyles pretty much blew off The Goliath Chronicles.

In Marvel comics, people have observed that the mutant comics, while theoretically part of the same setting, often seem to depict a rather different world from where the non-mutant titles take place. One where, among other things, the Canadian government is really, really evil, and nobody outside the X-teams shows up to help stop people from trying to wipe out mutants or the human race every other Thursday.

Some people reject all Alien movies after Aliens, since they shifted the setting into the future and invalidated the rather neat comic continuity that Dark Horse had built up around the first two movies. (Also, they killed off all the other characters Ripley worked so hard to save...)
Good point about Aliens. Similar deal with anything after Predator 2, though less extreme.
 

Q99

Genderpunk
Staff member
Moderator
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I’ve seen an argument that the TNG movies don’t fit that well with continuity. It’s a relatively easy to swallow one considering their iffy reception outside of First Contact.

The animated show has moved in and out of continuity.
 
Top Bottom