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Biggest Supposed Discontinuities in Sci-Fi Franchises (no defenses!)

MeMeMe

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Validated User
Thanks. I can't find the article I read which had them being much more careful about committing to anything - what they previously said could have been interpreted as either "they had a secret explanation for how it works with the snap, but no need to tell anyone to confuse them" or "we just dont want to deal with the snap, it doesnt fit our story so we are ignoring it."

Notice in your article, it points out the problems with saying its pre-snap. Season 5 had references to events that would make it impossible for Season 6 NOT be in the snap period. So bringing us back to this thread, this definitely qualifies as a discontinuity :)
 

Cenobite

Whiteside Pawn 909
Validated User
Notice in your article, it points out the problems with saying its pre-snap. Season 5 had references to events that would make it impossible for Season 6 NOT be in the snap period. So bringing us back to this thread, this definitely qualifies as a discontinuity :)
You'll never get a No-Prize with that attitude.
 

austenandrews

Member
RPGnet Member
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Notice in your article, it points out the problems with saying its pre-snap. Season 5 had references to events that would make it impossible for Season 6 NOT be in the snap period. So bringing us back to this thread, this definitely qualifies as a discontinuity :)
Yeah, it's absolutely a retcon.
 

Kovbasa

Registered User
Validated User
Mass Effect 1 and Mass Effect 3. In Mass Effect 1, the game makes it crystal clear that if the Reapers take the Citadel, that's it. Game over. Everyone's fucked.

Then the Reapers take the Citadel in Mass Effect 3. And somehow this doesn't result in the immediate game over that the franchise made ridiculously, plainly obvious would happen. It's like the third game was written by people who didn't know the plot of the first game.
It's been a while since I played ME1 & 2, but I thought that the whole purpose of the Reapers (well, Sovereign) taking the citadel was because it would allow it to transport the rest of the Reaper fleet, and after ME2 the Reapers were forced to take the long route instead. Am I misremembering?
 

Grumpygoat

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It's been a while since I played ME1 & 2, but I thought that the whole purpose of the Reapers (well, Sovereign) taking the citadel was because it would allow it to transport the rest of the Reaper fleet, and after ME2 the Reapers were forced to take the long route instead. Am I misremembering?
That's part of it. One, it allows the Reapers to all jump in from the dark fringes of the galaxy. Two, it controls the entire Relay network. Controlling the Citadel means that the Reapers can shut the network off, isolating galactic civilization from itself and picking it off solar system by solar system. It's an "I win" button for the Reapers. It's just one of the reasons why Mass Effect 3 has a deeply, deeply stupid main plot.
 

Kovbasa

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Validated User
That's part of it. One, it allows the Reapers to all jump in from the dark fringes of the galaxy. Two, it controls the entire Relay network. Controlling the Citadel means that the Reapers can shut the network off, isolating galactic civilization from itself and picking it off solar system by solar system. It's an "I win" button for the Reapers. It's just one of the reasons why Mass Effect 3 has a deeply, deeply stupid main plot.
Okay. That makes sense. By which I mean locking down all the jumpgates should allow the Reapers to curbstomp the rest of the galaxy at their leisure.
 

DailyRich

Damn fool idealist
Validated User
Indiana Jones in Raiders of the Lost Ark: "Oh, Marcus, what are you trying to do, scare me? You sound like my mother. We've known each other for a long time. I don't believe in magic, a lot of superstitious hocus-pocus. I'm going after a find of incredible historical significance. You're talking about the bogeyman."

He literally dealt with a magical stone-wielding bogeyman one year prior.
 

Nightward

IntranationalManOfMisery
Banned
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There are a number of bits of Battletech that have been broken off over the years:

  • The Sword and The Dagger was written first and there are some details in it that are not really the same as these days.
  • The Saban cartoon is now officially an in-universe propoganda cartoon, which vaguely gives some hints of what happened.
  • The last chapter of Surrender Your Dreams, set decades into the future, has been disowned after the future was rewritten.
  • The BattleTechnology magazine used to be considered canon but now isn't.
  • The various computer games have varying degrees of attachment to the core universe of the board game.
Probably also worth mentioning the War of 3039, the most heavily retconned era in the game.

Original incarnation, from the 20-Year Update: The Federated Commonwealth attacked the Draconis Combine. The Draconis Combine fought back far better than expected, using innovative tactics and fieldingan array of machines that nobody had seen on the battlefield for centuries in multiple regiments that noody else knew they even had. All of the factories for these machines were destroyed generations ago, making their presence even more shocking. With fighting bogging down, Theodore Kurita leading a counter-attack, and nobody sure of where all the new materiel was coming from, Hanse Davion halted the war and it was regarded as a stalemate. Only two pieces of new technology were used, Listen-Kill missiles and "Freezer" type experimental heat sinks.

A few novels in: Theodore Kurita straight-up tells Hanse Davion that the Draconis Combine was on the brink of utter ruin and collapse, and that had he fought on for even a few more days he would likely have destroyed it entirely. Some advanced technology like Ferro-Fibrous armour was around earlier than previously indicated, but was still prototypical.

Harmony Gold lawsuit: Since the unseen designs could no longer be shown in art, they were replaced by the downgraded Star League machines that the Draconis Combine had been using in the technical readouts and fiction. Everyone now has a reasonable supply of those machines lying around. How exactly it is then surprising that the Combine is deploying them in the War of 3039 is never addressed.

Historical: War of 3039: A sourcebook for the conflict is released. It depicts a one-sided beatdown where the Federated Commonwealth casually annihilates over a third of the Combine's forces. The Combine is not flexible and innovative, but hidebound and inept; every attempt to hold back the invasion fails. Theodore's counter-attack achieves nothing and it's no longer even clear what he hoped to achieve since the Federated Commonwealth wasn't pressed logistically in the scenario presented. A vast amount of experimental materiel was in use, but is removed from machines after the war for reasons that make little sense (ie, to justify how the Clan Invasion depicts them facing 3025-vintage machines in combat rather than upgraded models). Despite having an overwhelming advantage and believing the Combine is on the ropes, Hanse breaks off the attack because all the other sources say that's what he did next. This is somehow viewed as a stinging defeat for the Federated Commonwealth now, despite the level of their victory over the Combine and a net gain in worlds.

Mercenary Supplemental II: A sourcebook is published specifying when Star League technologies were recovered and became widely used by the various factions. Most of them have the full technology rather than the prototype equipment used in the War of 3039 sourcebook.

Tech Readout: 3039 and Revised series of Tech Readouts: Full Star League technology was extremely widespread during the 3030s and 3040s, to the point that many machines not seen originally until the 3050s were actually around then. The Clan Invasion somehow still happens as written despite the presence of these machines, and the tech upgrade percentages of early Field Manuals are never revisited to account for the far greater prevalence of technology in the field. Many Star League machines were not just deployed in the various House militaries, but remained in continuous production.

I would say that a slower recovery of technology adds verisimilitude to things, but wow. There's a lot of continuity snarls in there. It at least approaches some things from comic books, or even hits Doctor Who levels where it all just kind of has to be true simultaneously, because wibbly wobbly timey-whimey stuff.

Bonus discontinuity: In the Twilight of the Clans series, Khan Lincoln Osis scrapes together every able-bodied warrior he has and all available machines for a last-ditch defence of his homeworld. After the final battle there, the Smoke Jaguars can only field a single Binary of combat troops for the ceremonial combat to end the Invasion. The task force sent to wipe out the Smoke Jaguars, based on files they had before the war began and what they've caputred since, including at least two complete force listings in that time, conclude that a few hundred Jaguars survive, if that. However, the Home Clans then conduct trials against more Smoke Jaguars than that around and after their supposed demise, and you can't turn around without tripping over a Smoke Jaguar escapee later either, because there's no easier way to code "this is a really bad guy" than making them a Smoke Jaguar and no better redemption plot than "literally burned non-combatants to death before stomping their homes flat and condemned entire planets to famine and plague" to heading the BattleTech version of the Knights of the Round Table.
 
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