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Books We Are Reading 2019 [merged]

CaptainCrowbar

Charismatic Megafauna
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Can I plug my own book as New Weird? It's THE GUTTER PRAYER, just out from Orbit.
Just finished it. Really enjoyed it! Brimming over with originality, every few pages there's a new idea that other authors might have made the basis of a whole book. Will definitely be buying the sequels.
 

Shay Guy

Registered User
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Regrettably, I neglected to renew The Lies of Locke Lamora before someone put a hold on it, so now I'm paused somewhere around page 386. (I liked hitting that number.) Luckily I'm first in the library's queue, so I should have it back before too long.

Also luckily, Inter-Library Loan came through with Lois McMaster Bujold's Memory, which I was intrigued by even before starting -- I knew that there was something significant about it that meant it wouldn't be put in an omnibus, and that the description in the timeline the books have in the back just says "Miles hits thirty; thirty hits back". I got about halfway through in the past day (glad not to be worrying about not finishing in time to return it), and... man, Miles, you knew that was a bad idea. And you ignored multiple opportunities to turn away. If the gigantic breach in trust by itself wasn't enough, I think the sheer scale of the addiction it reveals might have been enough to justify cutting you off from your supply.

Enjoying the book overall, though I do regret not having yet read "The Mountains of Mourning" a little.
 

Capellan

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I Am, I Am, I Am by Maggie O'Farrell
Maggie O'Farrell's account of 17 times her life has intersected with the possibility of death is a somewhat uneven, oddly organised book. Some chapters - the first and the last come to mind immediately - are ferociously powerful and affecting (and possibly triggering, so be warned about that). Others, such as the "Once, my mother nearly accidentally slammed the car boot on my head" incident, feel a bit incidental.
 

Boris

I am invincible?
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Ok, the climax of The Consuming Fire is some grade A stuff. It's really freaking good.
 

Boris

I am invincible?
Validated User
Just started Foundryside by Robert Jackson Bennett. It's supposed to be basically Cyberpunk, but in a fantasy setting. It's interesting so far. The downsides of the main characters special talent are well depicted - basically wide-ranging psychometry, so she can't eat meat because she experiences the animal's death. Or touch other people, or bear to keep many possessions.
 

Capellan

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Polaris (Alex Benedict #2) by Jack McDevitt
Generally decent SF mystery let down by a few minor flaws: most prominently that it's obvious what is going on long before the narrator clues in. The action sequences also tend to lack a certain tension: they're so thoroughly and technically described that they lose the fluidity and sense of danger that they really need.
 

Andy-C

Setec Astronomer
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I finished What Angels Fear, by C. S. Harris, last night. Solid Regency-era murder-mystery.
 

mpswaim

Emo Dad
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Josh Malerman Bird Box -
And the creatures are never described...all we know about them is the effect they have on people who see them. Maybe that adds to the tension for some; I would have liked more description of them, but that's my issue. It is an ok read, but not a great read.
The movie has a good solution to this. When the women are giving birth, crazy guy is downstairs and he takes out a sketchpad and a bunch of sketches. The sketches are all of horrific things, but they're also wildly different. After seeing them, the audience is no closer to understanding what they look like.
 
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