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Books We Are Reading 2019 [merged]

Oddsod Blok'ed

Revolution In Apt 29.
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Still working my way through White Trash, because it wasn't as easy to read as I first thought. The author writes for Salon.com and it shows - I'm about 100 pages in and so far this book reads very much like a typical Salon article, where the connections are a bit hazy and I want more substance behind the provocative things it says. I am inclined to go see if some of Thomas Jefferson's (and probably Ben Franklin's and Andrew Jackson's) writings have made it into the public domain to verify that some of these ridiculous ideas were stated verbatim, but otherwise this comes off as a somewhat interesting but very flawed work of history.
 

Tom B

Registered User
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It's frustrating. I've had several fantasy books I've wanted to read for over a year now...but I am absolutely not in the right mindset to read fantasy. I've been reading nonfiction and science fiction, but just can't work up an interest in or patience for fantasy. It's never happened before...I've always read a pretty even mix.
 

Capellan

Member
RPGnet Member
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Haven't tried any of her works. Are there any in particular you would recommend?
I like them all :)

I really enjoyed the Beka Cooper books (Terrier, Bloodhound, Mastiff) but they do use a lot of in-universe slang which may be a barrier.

I read the first Song of the Lioness book (Alanna) when I was 10 and loved it. That might work. It's about a young woman who wants to be a knight.

The Circle of Magic books are neat too. Four young people with magic that works through 'mundane' foci: weaving, blacksmithing etc.
 

Gilliam

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And just finished "The City & The City" by China Mieville. This is the first book by Mieville that I have read and I did enjoy it, just enough mystery and show not tell that kept me interested to see it through to the end as detective novels are normally not my cup of tea
 

Boris

I am invincible?
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And just finished "The City & The City" by China Mieville. This is the first book by Mieville that I have read and I did enjoy it, just enough mystery and show not tell that kept me interested to see it through to the end as detective novels are normally not my cup of tea
Do you know there was a BBC adaptation released relatively recently? I thought it was pretty good, though it diverges from the novel.
 

Gilliam

Registered User
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Do you know there was a BBC adaptation released relatively recently? I thought it was pretty good, though it diverges from the novel.
Thanks, I was only aware of the BBC version because they advertised it on the book cover and as I am in New Zealand I'm not sure if we will get to see it. Considering the premise of the story it would be interesting to see how they portray it on the screen.
 

Kraus

Diligent Procrastinator
RPGnet Member
Validated User
It's frustrating. I've had several fantasy books I've wanted to read for over a year now...but I am absolutely not in the right mindset to read fantasy. I've been reading nonfiction and science fiction, but just can't work up an interest in or patience for fantasy. It's never happened before...I've always read a pretty even mix.
Perhaps try some modern-day urban fantasy? I've noticed that I stopped having any enthusiam for multi-volume fantasy epics quite a few years ago because they felt like work, with the massive page counts, large casts of characters, and reams of world-building lore. So all of the fantasy fiction that I read now is either older novels (ebooks have brought back an amazing amount of great work), or a few urban fantasy series.

Just finished Storm Front, by Jim Butcher, as an audio book, and have nearly completed Fool Moon. The audio format with the perfect narration of James Marsters makes these stories absolutely shine as entertainment. I wouldn't sit down and read a Dresden story, but am eagerly looking to forward to the next audio book in the series.

Also currently reading The Vikings, by Magnus Magnusson, given to me as a Christmas present. Magnusson was a TV personality in the UK, perhaps best known for being about the only Icelandic TV personality in the UK, and hosting a high-brow quiz show. The Vikings is really, really good. It's detailed, but compellingly readable, and scrupulously fair: the discussions of the social causes of the Viking phenomenon and the situation in Europe that enabled it are fascinating.
 

Boris

I am invincible?
Validated User
Thanks, I was only aware of the BBC version because they advertised it on the book cover and as I am in New Zealand I'm not sure if we will get to see it. Considering the premise of the story it would be interesting to see how they portray it on the screen
It was available on ABC iView in Australia, and can be bought on Google Play. I'm not sure about New Zealand.

The Cities are shown in pretty cool ways, with very distinct visual styles. Beszel looks Eastern Bloc and run down while Ul Qooma looks like Dubai. The show obviously had a limited budget but there are a few awesome crossover/breach shots.
 

Capellan

Member
RPGnet Member
Validated User
The Ruin (Cormac Reilly #1) by Dervla McTiernan
Fairly routine crime novel set in Ireland. The characters have lots of backstory hinted at, but are pretty flat as individuals and none of them really have any kind of arc. There's just the mystery to solve, which might work if that was was great, but any moderately attentive reader is likely to work out whodunnit well before characters themselves clue-in.

Relentless (The Lost Fleet, #5) by Jack Campbell
A bit of a soft entry in the series, this. The battles feel perfunctory and the resolution of the conspiracy subplot is very limp: though it would be hard to give it all that much impact given that the earlier books in the series pretty much failed to establish much of a cast of prospective bad guys.
 
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