Can we use gunpowder? Please.

mindstalk

Does the math.
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Tangent: _The Hidden Life of Trees_ says there was a belief that beeches weren't hit by lightning. He says that actually they didn't show the signs of being hit by lightning: smooth bark meant the rain would be a sheet of water, and the lightning would just run down that. Vs. rougher barked trees like oaks, which break up the water, so the lightning finds least-resistance paths through the wood.
 

DarkStarling

Brilliantly Crazed
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Tangent: _The Hidden Life of Trees_ says there was a belief that beeches weren't hit by lightning. He says that actually they didn't show the signs of being hit by lightning: smooth bark meant the rain would be a sheet of water, and the lightning would just run down that. Vs. rougher barked trees like oaks, which break up the water, so the lightning finds least-resistance paths through the wood.
Cool, I like that!
 

Shade the Lost

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Tangent: _The Hidden Life of Trees_ says there was a belief that beeches weren't hit by lightning. He says that actually they didn't show the signs of being hit by lightning: smooth bark meant the rain would be a sheet of water, and the lightning would just run down that. Vs. rougher barked trees like oaks, which break up the water, so the lightning finds least-resistance paths through the wood.
So, in a fantasy setting, beechwood might be highly valuable for conveying an innate resistance to lightning bolts and the like? I could buy that. Beech casks for gunpowder with brass hoops or something?
 

vitruvian

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So, in a fantasy setting, beechwood might be highly valuable for conveying an innate resistance to lightning bolts and the like? I could buy that. Beech casks for gunpowder with brass hoops or something?
Traditionally amulets and talismans protecting from lightning strikes were made from things like fulgurites, but sure, beechwood might be used for that too.

Honestly, there should probably be a whole class of protective amulets and charms cropping up as Common magic items, offering a small bonus or advantage on certain types of saving throws.
 

Bình

Unregistered user
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Once again, I have to ask what about firearms requires all this detail when even old grapple rules weren't this complicated.
In stories and movies, swords just cut the hero on the arm or cheek to give him a cool-looking superficial scratch with a trickle of blood, but mooks get decapitated, disemboweled, or run through the heart (even through plate armor!) in one blow. So, you know, swords do 1d6 or 1d8 damage: enough to kill a 1st level nobody, but not immediately lethal to heroes.

Guns, on the other hand, blow mooks away in one shot--BLAM! Right between the eyes! But they only force heroes to duck or sometimes graze them on the shoulder or thigh to give them a cool-looking superficial scratch with a trickle of blood. So, obviously, guns are much more lethal than swords so they need to do 4d12 damage with a x5 crit multiplier on an attack roll of 12+ and they ignore armor of course.
 

vitruvian

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Once again, I have to ask what about firearms requires all this detail when even old grapple rules weren't this complicated.
Absolutely nothing - I'm good to go with the write ups in the DMG, myself. The part of the discussion that continues to interest me is effects on the larger society of firearms at the different levels of technology becoming fairly common.
 

DarkStarling

Brilliantly Crazed
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Well again, I think the main thing it does is take artillery out of the hands of the intellectual elite. That was a big deal in Codex Alera. A world mostly focuses on magic sees the first large scale use of catapults firing cheaply enchanted fireballs, and the utter devastation it brings on the battlefield. And the people watching realizing that it's the end of the era of High Lords with their awesome firepower dominating the world. Wizards still have a place on the battlefield, but they can no longer shift the course of a battle on their own. The age of Sorcerer Lords is over, whether magic remains the dominant force in small unit combat or not.

Summoning elemental beings is fairly easy. And, as established, fire elemental types treat gunpowder like hard drugs. For this reason, all powder stores and factories have extensive wards and water-based guardians. But despite the best efforts of the guard, there is still at least one major powder manufacturer run by an Efreet that doubles as an interplanar drug cartel.
 

Nelzie

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Well again, I think the main thing it does is take artillery out of the hands of the intellectual elite. That was a big deal in Codex Alera. A world mostly focuses on magic sees the first large scale use of catapults firing cheaply enchanted fireballs, and the utter devastation it brings on the battlefield. And the people watching realizing that it's the end of the era of High Lords with their awesome firepower dominating the world. Wizards still have a place on the battlefield, but they can no longer shift the course of a battle on their own. The age of Sorcerer Lords is over, whether magic remains the dominant force in small unit combat or not.

Summoning elemental beings is fairly easy. And, as established, fire elemental types treat gunpowder like hard drugs. For this reason, all powder stores and factories have extensive wards and water-based guardians. But despite the best efforts of the guard, there is still at least one major powder manufacturer run by an Efreet that doubles as an interplanar drug cartel.
Both of those would be some very interesting elements for a game world to have. I might crib some of that, as I hadn't really considered drugs in my home brew, previously, but really... They should exist.

There's also no Efreets, but... there are "Elemental Lords" that have a different set of powers and abilities.
 
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