• The Infractions Forum is available for public view. Please note that if you have been suspended you will need to open a private/incognito browser window to view it.

Captain Marvel Controversies

Seroster

Miw!
Validated User
I'm not sure what you mean by that moment per se.

To me, as a song, it's a capstone of the arc of the movie. Carol goes from being told by the Kree that her powers had been a gift, that she needed to keep her emotions in check, that her background wasn't important, which were all lies to keep her weak. By the end of the film, she's learned that she already had her powers, that she doesn't need to keep her emotions in check, and she knows her past.

"Oh, I've had it up to here"
 

ShadowbaneX

Registered User
Validated User
I'm not sure what you mean by that moment per se.

To me, as a song, it's a capstone of the arc of the movie. Carol goes from being told by the Kree that her powers had been a gift, that she needed to keep her emotions in check, that her background wasn't important, which were all lies to keep her weak. By the end of the film, she's learned that she already had her powers, that she doesn't need to keep her emotions in check, and she knows her past.

"Oh, I've had it up to here"
Add in a dash (sorry) a all-you-can-eat buffet of "you can take your society and shove it". It's not just about gaining power, it's a rejection (in whole) of Kree society.

"Oh, I'm just a girl, what's my destiny?/What I've succumbed to is making me numb."

Also, it's the perfect counterpoint to Nirvana's Come as you are. Both songs need to be taken together for the full effect. Somber grunge to reveal the full oppression, and perky pop to represent breaking free.
 

wheloc

He's trying real hard to be one of the good guys.
RPGnet Member
Validated User
People are now having hissy fits saying the Skrull are stand-in's for immigrants and the Kree are obviously taking a shot at ICE. Seriously
If ICE doesn't want to get compared to the villains so often, maybe they should consider acting less villainous :p
So I don't want roll around in the comment muck, but I was scrolling randomly through my YouTube recommendations and Just A Girl came up. I thought oh why not. While it was playing I scrolled through the comments, which unsurprisingly had a bunch of people talking about the fight scene. I also saw one comment being snarky because the author discovered the song in 2007, not like all these Johny come latelys. It's probably a good thing I don't have any ice cream in the freezer because I think I used up all my will power not leaving a response.
A friend of mine hates Iron Man because he feels the character glorifies the military-industrial complex, and he still goes livid when he remembers that Black Sabbath's "Iron Man" played during the closing credits.

Myself, I don't see how they could have done a film called Iron man without using that song, and I admire their restraint in only using it in the trailers and credits.
 
Last edited:

Crinos

Next to me you're all number two!
Validated User
A friend of mine hates Iron Man because he feels the character glorifies the military-industrial complex, and he still goes livid when he remembers that Black Sabbath's "Iron Man" played during the closing credits.

Myself, I don't see how they could have done a film called Iron man without using that song, and I admire their restraint in only using it in the trailers and credits.
Well, your friend is entitled to their opinions, but I would point out that the entire point about Iron Man is Tony realizing how horrible the Military Industrial complex is when he gets blown the hell up by his own weapons (which Staine has been selling to anyone indiscriminately without his knowledge) and him cancelling Stark Industries weapon manufacturing the second he was able to (and then fighting Staine in mech suits when he tried to stop him). So its kind of the opposite of glorifying the Military Industrial complex.

Now, Granted, if he means how Tony is depicted as this wealthy dilettante living this total baller lifestyle during act one, then yeah I guess so, but I don't think its meant to glorify than to show Tony is a callous selfish asshole.
 

wheloc

He's trying real hard to be one of the good guys.
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Well, your friend is entitled to their opinions, but I would point out that the entire point about Iron Man is Tony realizing how horrible the Military Industrial complex is when he gets blown the hell up by his own weapons (which Staine has been selling to anyone indiscriminately without his knowledge) and him cancelling Stark Industries weapon manufacturing the second he was able to (and then fighting Staine in mech suits when he tried to stop him). So its kind of the opposite of glorifying the Military Industrial complex.

Now, Granted, if he means how Tony is depicted as this wealthy dilettante living this total baller lifestyle during act one, then yeah I guess so, but I don't think its meant to glorify than to show Tony is a callous selfish asshole.
Tony got mad because his weapons were being sold black-market style to terrorists. That's an incitement of a corrupt military-industrial complex, not the military-industrial complex in general.

Moreso, the Iron Man military-industrial complex is corrupt in a very fictional way that was designed to get people scared of "the terrorists", which is propaganda that the real military-industrial complex uses for recruitment (this is my argument now, not necessarily my friend's). Which yes ties into the whole "does Captain Marvel glorify the Airforce?" controversy. Overall, I still feel the MCU films are very pro-US Military, but complaining about Captain Marvel in particular seems nitpicky.
 

FrivYeti

Yeti On The Lam!
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Tony got mad because his weapons were being sold black-market style to terrorists. That's an incitement of a corrupt military-industrial complex, not the military-industrial complex in general.

Moreso, the Iron Man military-industrial complex is corrupt in a very fictional way that was designed to get people scared of "the terrorists", which is propaganda that the real military-industrial complex uses for recruitment (this is my argument now, not necessarily my friend's). Which yes ties into the whole "does Captain Marvel glorify the Airforce?" controversy. Overall, I still feel the MCU films are very pro-US Military, but complaining about Captain Marvel in particular seems nitpicky.
I'm less sure of that, although you could definitely take that away.

The terrorists in Iron Man aren't the real threat - Stane is. The terrorists are just the people Stane is using to make money; when they start to be a problem, he casually wipes them out and moves on to the next thing. The real danger is white industrialists using strife in other countries as an excuse to make money. And when Stark gets back from his kidnapping, he doesn't say "we need to really beef up our internal processes," he says "Stark Industries needs to get out of the weapon-making game and start actually helping people."

This continues in Iron Man 2, in which our two villains are a rich white industrialist trying to use other people to make money, and an angry guy whose life was ruined by rich white industrialists trying to make money. And then in Iron Man 3, the rich white industrialist literally invents terrorists to scare people in order to cover his errors and then tries to parlay it into taking over the country and making money.
 
Top Bottom