[Castle Falkenstein] Talk to me about Castle Falkenstein

LordDraqo

Technical Shaman
Validated User
Heh. The Ranger equivalents could be a lot of fun.
Hmm. I really should re-read the series and play in the wiki. The rules wouldn't need tweaking to make it work.
Which series are we talking about? Ketty Jay? If so, I would love for you to share some links.
 

James Gray

Registered User
Validated User
LordDraqo said:
That is correct. Many fine bits have been revealed however, I would love to see a book that did for the Far East (Japan, China, Korea, et al) what the Ottoman Empire book for GURPS Falkenstein did for the Middle East. Heck, I would even be willing to start swotting something together for the folks at Fat Goblin, just to see it happen.
At the moment, our docket's a little full up. We've got at least three big books planned, as well as a number of little ones. I'm not ruling out a Miss Peril's Guide to... in the future. Hong Kong makes sense, perhaps, as a first stop.
 

Pilgrim

30 Days of Gravity
Validated User
Which series are we talking about? Ketty Jay? If so, I would love for you to share some links.
The Ketty Jay series. And what looked like at wikis at the Shadows of the Apt level were pretty much abandoned after a few entries. My bad.
But the series is fun.
 

Phil Masters

Registered User
Validated User
There are a few obvious differences. The big one being the Browncoats in Firefly seem to be a little less on the "keeping people as slaves" side of things for the most part.
Frankly, one of the things that made me a little queasy about Firefly, after I spotted it, was that it could be read as thinly disguised romance-of-the-lost-cause pro-Confederate BS. The crew are basically something like the James Gang with all that nasty casual-murder and pro-slavery stuff swept under the carpet.

Sometimes, the big central government which won the war was in the right.

I think the Reavers would be more interesting keeping their origin. Not as Native Americans but as a test of a Magickal weapon which went wrong and created, essentially, cannibal zombies.
Or a mad science project gone wrong. This is everything-but-the-kitchen-sink CF; everything is on the table. And I think simply making the Reavers into regular Native Americans might be ... problematic.
 

James Gray

Registered User
Validated User
Frankly, one of the things that made me a little queasy about Firefly, after I spotted it, was that it could be read as thinly disguised romance-of-the-lost-cause pro-Confederate BS. The crew are basically something like the James Gang with all that nasty casual-murder and pro-slavery stuff swept under the carpet.

Sometimes, the big central government which won the war was in the right.
I do agree. It doesn't transplant particularly well, directly. It could be Mal and Zoe were part of Union forces but in a battle which failed tremendously. Of course, it doesn't have to be the American Civil War. It could have been they were fighting in the Franco-Mexican war or another at the time. They're too young to have been in the Texas Revolution.


Or a mad science project gone wrong. This is everything-but-the-kitchen-sink CF; everything is on the table. And I think simply making the Reavers into regular Native Americans might be ... problematic.
I'd prefer avoiding turning any Indigenous group (or religious group or... well... you get the idea) into cannibal zombies. Perhaps better for the US to have been testing a possible chemical weapon intended for use against the Twenty Nations Confederation of the Confederacy on some remote settlers (which went horribly wrong).
 

SibKhatru

Registered User
Validated User
Frankly, one of the things that made me a little queasy about Firefly, after I spotted it, was that it could be read as thinly disguised romance-of-the-lost-cause pro-Confederate BS. The crew are basically something like the James Gang with all that nasty casual-murder and pro-slavery stuff swept under the carpet.


Sometimes, the big central government which won the war was in the right.

(snip)
I think the show and movie tried to side-step rather than sweep under. I mean, heck, the operative is a black man. The real emphasis is on the federalism tension set up against the libertarian views. There's much more scifi here than historical revisionism. Rather, its extrapolation of the "earth got used up" (bogus BS IMO, but shot-through with entertainment appeal) alongside the fact that China will be the world's largest economy Very Soon. Plus, feminism. (Even if Whedon is really a whore, he was trying to bring out woman as weapon, though the fact that River is twisted by the Central Guv toys with his MO; I guess Echo was more of a byproduct of pure private tech, though a conspiracy seems in the offering, eh?).
 

Baeraad

I'm so tiiiiirrreeeeed...
Validated User
The worst offender is Tom Olam in the actual rulebook, who I'd like to punch if I met him. I can't stand the authorial voice used when writing him. It grinds on my nerves.
Oh dear lord, yes. Every word out of his mouth is pure concentrated humblebrag. "Golly gee, I'm just a regular guy! I can't imagine why everyone makes such a fuss about me and calls me a hero just because I happened to be completely essential to saving the world! Also, the most beautiful and accomplished woman in the world totally has a crush on me, imagine that, hahaha!"

Aaaaarrrggggh.

I always kind of got the impression that Tom was actually the annoying tag-along sidekick who all the actually capable characters grudgingly put up with, and that the information in the book was his extremely slanted account of what happened. I don't think that's how it's intended, though.
 

DavetheLost

Registered User
Validated User
Yes, Tom Olam's exploits go down much easier if you take them as the fantasies of a wannabee tagging along with the movers and shakers. Otherwise he is just too much of a Morty Stu to be bearable.

I like the idea of someone from our world being spell napped into the Falkenstein world and serving as our view point character. But, not so much, Olam as that character.
 

James Gray

Registered User
Validated User
Yes, Tom Olam's exploits go down much easier if you take them as the fantasies of a wannabee tagging along with the movers and shakers. Otherwise he is just too much of a Morty Stu to be bearable.

I like the idea of someone from our world being spell napped into the Falkenstein world and serving as our view point character. But, not so much, Olam as that character.
The Fat Goblin Games products have, thus far, leaned towards using Tom Olam only for the rules-specific and introduction material. For example, the main narrators in Curious Creatures are Doctor Dolittle for the bestiary and Doctor Dolittle's kid sidekick, Tommy Stubbins (now all grown up) for the fiction. Even then, Tommy doesn't so much solve problems as be present when problems are solved by various other characters he meets.
 

LoneWolf23

Registered User
Validated User
Yes, Tom Olam's exploits go down much easier if you take them as the fantasies of a wannabee tagging along with the movers and shakers. Otherwise he is just too much of a Morty Stu to be bearable.

I like the idea of someone from our world being spell napped into the Falkenstein world and serving as our view point character. But, not so much, Olam as that character.
I did not like Tom Olam myself, but mostly due to his annoying luddite attitude towards the idea of the world of Castle Falkenstein embracing anything resembling our world's modernism. Yes, Tom, heaven forbid someone in Europa invent a working Steampunk Television or a functional Steampunk Internet, or God Forbid, SKYSCRAPERS. We need to keep Europa as Victorian as Possible, no matter what possible benefits to society such technologies might bring.

Sorry, I just do not like Luddism.
 
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