Changing opposed 2d6 rolls into a single player-facing roll

Old Man Vegan

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#1
So if both sides in a contest compare [2d6+bonus] then to make it a single player-facing roll I'd have the player roll [2d6-2d6+bonus] and compare to the GM's flat bonus. Yeah?

Example: Ninja (+2) vs superhero (+4). Ninja would roll 2d6+2 vs superhero 2d6+4. Or,

Player rolls superhero [2d6-2d6+4] vs static 2 (the ninja's bonus) and compares.

I like this for PbP as I think it would drastically cut down on waiting for the GM to respond to every post. When players are attacked, they'd be told the acting bonus against them and roll to defend.
 

MeMeMe

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#2
You could for simplicity use 4d6-14. in place of 2d6-2d6. The odds are identical, since it is exactly the same roll.

Essentially it would be 4d6-14 + attack ability - defence ability, or 4d6 + ability vs 14 + difficulty.

If the players are rolling, this becomes:
Roll 4d6 + ability, you just tell them to beat a difficulty of 14 + defence.

This will be much simpler for them to grasp.
 

Knaight

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#4
That said, while they're mathematically identical there are differences in roll interpretation. 2d6 vs 2d6 where you fail with both rolling well tends to feed description differently than 2d6 vs 2d6 where you fail with both rolling poorly. 2d6-2d6 keeps this pretty well, 4d6 vs 14+Def doesn't.
 

MeMeMe

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#5
That's true, but really only works well when the two rolls are being made by different people. When one person is making both rolls, and being called on to interpret both rolls, feels a bit strange and clunky IMO. The trade off for a simpler addition system, where your free to narrate it however you like, seems worth it to me.

If really needed, you can still do it by using dice of different colours. If the two green dice roll high, you did well, if they rolled low, you did badly. If the two red dice rolled high, your opponent did badly, if they roll low, your opponent did well.
 

mitchw

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#7
With 2d6 opposed the biggest spread is 10 when one roll is a 2 and the other is a 12. If you roll 2d6 and assume that the opposition rolls the average (7) that makes your biggest spread 5. If, like Fate, the skill is more important than the roll then you should still be okay.
 
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