Chuubo's Marvelous Wish-Granting Engine - Kickstarter thread Final Stretch Edition

Stephen Lea Sheppard

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#1
I'mma just steal Blackwingedheaven's first post from the previous thread, since it's an effective intro to the subject matter:

A link to the Kickstarter!

From the old thread:

Rand Brittain said:
For those of you who don't know, Chuubo's Marvelous Wish-Granting Engine is the latest game by Jenna Moran, author of RPG classics such as Nobilis, Weapons of the Gods, and contributor to Exalted's Games of Divinity and Exalted: the Sidereals. It's a pastoral adventure game that spins off from the mortals rules for Nobilis, to create a laid-back fantasy series with a structure similar to games like Persona 4 or shows like Kamichu!, while scaling up to the high adventure and mysticism of something like Revolutionary Girl Utena.

This Kickstarter will scale up to include the hardcover Chuubo core, the first setting book, Fortitude: By the Docks of Big Lake, and the first campaign, The Glass-Maker's Dragon.

I don't want to exaggerate or anything, but The Glass-Maker's Dragon is the best thing Jenna Moran ever wrote.

You can check out the previous spoiler thread, and Jenna and the other playtesters and I will be on tap to answer your questions about the game. Please consider making Town your new home!

Chuubo's RPG is a great game for pastoral fantasy, and all sorts of other stuff. Backing the game gets you the full draft of the game right now, in addition to eventually getting the swank, full-color corebook. Over the course of the last couple of threads, Jenna and the playtesters have mentioned such influences as Kamichu!, Shingu: Secrets of the Stellar Wars, Miyazaki's Ghibli films, My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic, and Homestuck, so it can work with a wide array of genres, play styles, and campaign concepts. The setting, Town, is one of the coolest little fantasy worlds I've ever had the pleasure of reading, so I hope you'll take a look at the game.

^_^
 

Eco-Mono

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#2
As long as we're talking about clever little references to past works, I definitely smiled at the suggestion of
Spoiler: Show
an imperfectly-controlled wheel of swords spinning in the air near you
as an alternative Toxin for Entropy Jr.
 
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Jenna Moran

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#3
Chuubo's RPG is a great game for pastoral fantasy, and all sorts of other stuff. Backing the game gets you the full draft of the game right now, in addition to eventually getting the swank, full-color corebook.
Plus a full draft of, and eventually ePub and/or PDF of, the first supplement; and an ePub/PDF of a huge campaign---

We haven't hit the final stretch goal for the campaign, but at this point you're already getting a huge and playable campaign and the only question is how much stuff will be in it. ^_^

Best wishes,

Jenna
 

Jenna Moran

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#4
Brother Prickle said:
I think I just realized Seizhi's Nobilis connection. I've noticed quite a few of the lifepaths are based on Nobilis concepts, but he...he is based on something NEWER.
Yes. ^_^

Eco-Mono said:
So just to check: do the rats count as "human-like creatures" for the purposes of the Best Friend's superpower?
Definitely!

Technically that is a setting matter to be decided at the gaming table, but the wishing hearts of the rats seem awful similar to the wishing hearts that humans have.

hyphz said:
Hmm. I'm not sure I like the look of those later ice-cream wishes. The idea about making "Chuubo has an ice cream" a law of reality which meant he couldn't eat it is a nice and clear one and gives you an idea regarding how Imperial miracles work. But those later ones messing up without knowing why... well, they seem to me falling dangerously close to making the Wishing Engine an evil genie, and the only rational response to an evil genie is to ignore it as it doesn't really give you the ability to make good or useful wishes anyway. Is there some clarification?
Indeed!

The rules for Chuubo's power have clarification on this, but that isn't really important. The thing that keeps wishing from devolving into an evil genie or, for that matter, an obedient genie, is:

  • a rules set for manipulating and exploiting wishes that are already in play;
  • quests that assume that your wishes are blowing up in your face;
  • quests that assume that your wishes are making the world better; and
  • quests that assume that your wishes have a thematic heart that can be exposed, studied, and used to understand how to bridge from frozen dairy helplessness to successful consumption of a treat.

Those assumptions are important; just as one evil genie wish makes it more likely that the next wish will go evil genie (because the group is primed), one sub-story or situation that assumes that a wish goes well or can go well makes it more likely that the wish will go well (because the group is primed for that) and that the next one will as well!

Stephenls said:
(Really Town kind of needs an abandoned amusement park, because Spirited Away.)
That's plausible! Maybe part of Horizon, but it becomes Arcadia when the sun goes . . . up? Down?

Susanoo Orbatos said:
Horizon is an Abandoned Amusement park.. for vampires.
Hee.

CLAVDIVS said:
Now I'm thinking about a Silent Hill game using Chuubo's. Talk about a Road of Trials...
Ouch!

Best wishes,

Jenna
 
#5
I'm dead tired and haven't actually read through all of Chuubo's Marvelous Wish-Granting Engine quite yet, but... as I saw that editing is still being done based on feedback, I thought I should bring up something that has been a bit confusing for me, just in case it's not just me.

I have been a bit uncertain on how to handle things like emoting and emotion XP in forum and IRC games. It's not hard to work out a solution, of course - just writing "(character name) emotes happy" or "*thumbs up*" or something like that - and it might well be something that's best figured out by each individual group, but the book did leave me with the impression that some of it was written with a live game in mind and would take a bit of thought to adapt.

It's possible that I'm just tired and haven't read it carefully enough and this isn't a thing. Sections of the book did give advice on playing the game in different formats, I remember.
 

Law Orc

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#6
I'm dead tired and haven't actually read through all of Chuubo's Marvelous Wish-Granting Engine quite yet, but... as I saw that editing is still being done based on feedback, I thought I should bring up something that has been a bit confusing for me, just in case it's not just me.

I have been a bit uncertain on how to handle things like emoting and emotion XP in forum and IRC games. It's not hard to work out a solution, of course - just writing "(character name) emotes happy" or "*thumbs up*" or something like that - and it might well be something that's best figured out by each individual group, but the book did leave me with the impression that some of it was written with a live game in mind and would take a bit of thought to adapt.

It's possible that I'm just tired and haven't read it carefully enough and this isn't a thing. Sections of the book did give advice on playing the game in different formats, I remember.
In my group, we handle it through characters saying or doing something that indicates the relevant emotion, and when necessary pointing that fact out in parentheses, which is our convention for ooc stuff.
 

Garris

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#7
Regarding emoting, the Fortitude draft puts it right at the front of the book: be as explicit as you must be! So, in a forum game, I might spend extra word count on embellishing the description. I have time, and that sort of thing really helps make the slow-paced PbPs feel rewarding, for all that they take a while. In a face-to-face game with people I am both familiar with and comfortable with, I might (sometimes) instead work to express the character's emotions through myself, because that sort of thing is one of the joys of playing in person. In an IRC game? In an IRC game I would usually type "emotes (emotional state, however complicated or simple it may be)" in order to make things run faster, and not risk valuable information being lost in the text in what's normally a pretty fast-paced medium for play.

Edit:

Also, I'm so incredibly happy that the number of backers has shot up this dramatically. I know they'll break a thousand, now!

Hopefully the Backers who were in the PDF tiers, but considering getting a physical copy, will have a look at Claudia Cangini's layout work on other books and come to lust after the sort of loveliness that Chuubo's will possess. My only regret is that, when we break 80K, I may have to give up on Art Sponsorship T_T. That's what I get for picking up my first credit card ever in anticipation of this campaign...
 
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Jenna Moran

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#8
I'm dead tired and haven't actually read through all of Chuubo's Marvelous Wish-Granting Engine quite yet, but... as I saw that editing is still being done based on feedback, I thought I should bring up something that has been a bit confusing for me, just in case it's not just me.

I have been a bit uncertain on how to handle things like emoting and emotion XP in forum and IRC games. It's not hard to work out a solution, of course - just writing "(character name) emotes happy" or "*thumbs up*" or something like that - and it might well be something that's best figured out by each individual group, but the book did leave me with the impression that some of it was written with a live game in mind and would take a bit of thought to adapt.

It's possible that I'm just tired and haven't read it carefully enough and this isn't a thing. Sections of the book did give advice on playing the game in different formats, I remember.
In my group, we handle it through characters saying or doing something that indicates the relevant emotion, and when necessary pointing that fact out in parentheses, which is our convention for ooc stuff.
Regarding emoting, the Fortitude draft puts it right at the front of the book: be as explicit as you must be! So, in a forum game, I might spend extra word count on embellishing the description. I have time, and that sort of thing really helps make the slow-paced PbPs feel rewarding, for all that they take a while. In a face-to-face game with people I am both familiar with and comfortable with, I might (sometimes) instead work to express the character's emotions through myself, because that sort of thing is one of the joys of playing in person. In an IRC game? In an IRC game I would usually type "emotes (emotional state, however complicated or simple it may be)" in order to make things run faster, and not risk valuable information being lost in the text in what's normally a pretty fast-paced medium for play.
I've found that "I emote sadness" or "I emote confusion" or "I emote yay!" is actually surprisingly functional. It sounds like it'd be lame but it really isn't.

It's like . . . it's like refusing to block yourself.

Edit:

Also, I'm so incredibly happy that the number of backers has shot up this dramatically. I know they'll break a thousand, now!

Hopefully the Backers who were in the PDF tiers, but considering getting a physical copy, will have a look at Claudia Cangini's layout work on other books and come to lust after the sort of loveliness that Chuubo's will possess. My only regret is that, when we break 80K, I may have to give up on Art Sponsorship T_T. That's what I get for picking up my first credit card ever in anticipation of this campaign...
^_^

Well, ;_; at part of it, but still! ^_^

Best wishes,

Jenna
 

Garris

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#9
I've found that "I emote sadness" or "I emote confusion" or "I emote yay!" is actually surprisingly functional. It sounds like it'd be lame but it really isn't.
Definitely! Simple sentences - simple declarations - can be very,very powerful, and the lack of ambiguity does wonders for allowing response to the emotion itself.
 

Skycroft

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#10
I really like the concept of emoting.

So one thing I think I noticed: I don't think Fading is either necessary (it's easy to keep multiple scenes running) or desirable (you do not want to slow down posting even a little bit) in PbP games.
 
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