Classical dice pool meccanic with a twist

Giovanni

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Roll X d6: 6,5,4 are success 3,2,1 are blank.
You succed if you roll a number of success equal to or higher than a threshold value.
Your degree of success is success obtained - threshold...

....But:

you can roll a number of dice Y < X.
If you do not roll equal or higher than threshold nothing special happen.
If you roll higher than threshold you add to your degree of success X-Y.
Basically you lower your probability of success but you increase your degree of success in case of a successful test.

It can be used in combat where the degree of success can determine damage and also for spells if spells have a difficulty vaue and a description that make the spell effect dependant by the degree of success.

What do you think?
Flaws?
 

CarpeGuitarrem

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Nifty! John Wick's games Houses of the Blooded and Blood & Honor use a system similar to this. You roll a pool of d6s, attempting to get a sum of 10. Before you roll, you can set aside dice, called "wagers". On a success, having more wagers gets you a higher degree of success.

I'd advise you to run the numbers, and go with it!
 

MoonHunter

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This is going to need examples... good examples.

You will need to present a good way to show that you are keeping dice at the table. Systems like this have always had the keeping track issues.

It is just a bit of strategy and complication on the chances, as it is just a conditional success roll. I have a threshold of 1 (hopefully throwing 3 dice to ensure I do it), and any extra dice... just to bump effect. If I have a higher threshold, might as well toss them all to ensure threshold and then get the successes as a bonus.

Someone better at statistics needs to run those for you. I am not sure the conditional success is worth it.



Personally I would rather have variable numbers to meet and skill mods. Attributes determine number of dice, skills add to each die thrown. Sixes would explode. Compare to difficulty. Hotshots have more dice to throw (having great stats) and be able to have more wild chances, but skilled characters would have more consistant successes.
 

CarpeGuitarrem

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Come to think of it, the odds aren't hard to calculate. Every two dice you roll equals a success. So having five dice would reliably give you two successes and a 1 margin of success. Work your numbers around that.

I would definitely word it as follows...

"Roll X dice; 4-6 are successes. Before you roll, set aside any number of dice; you don't roll them. If you get enough successes, then the number of dice you set aside determines your margin of success."
 

MoonHunter

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Come to think of it, the odds aren't hard to calculate. Every two dice you roll equals a success. So having five dice would reliably give you two successes and a 1 margin of success. Work your numbers around that.
2d6 give you a 75% of of one success. 25% chance of two.
3d6 give you an 87.5% of one success. Three successes is 12.5%. Two successes on three dice I believe is 75% (but someone check me)
 

Giovanni

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"Roll X dice; 4-6 are successes. Before you roll, set aside any number of dice; you don't roll them. If you get enough successes, then the number of dice you set aside determines your margin of success."
This variant sounds good. In the original X-Y is added to the degree of success, in your variant (if i understand it correctly) X-Y determines alone the degree of success.
It make more important the choice of Y [from 0 to X-1].

This is going to need examples... good examples.
i will insert lot of examples....my english is atrocius so i do not write them here :)....the game will be in italian
 

CarpeGuitarrem

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Ah, that's an interesting distinction, sorry I didn't gloss that from the first post. So hmm...

Expected successes = 0.5 X + Y where X + Y is your stat, and 0.5 X > Z (the difficulty).

I don't think the two different variants are all that numerically different. The one I suggested will on average yield lower values (because you sometimes "waste" extra successes because more dice than needed get the successes) and a greater edge of risk. I don't know how the math works, but the ideal is picking the right amount of dice to roll such that you're reasonably likely to roll one success, and not extra. Then you devote the rest of your dice to guaranteed extra successes.
 
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