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Comic Recommendations for someone who last read Spiderman in the 60s but loved Into the Spiderverse?

Stork!

Wish I was a hippo.
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My dad was way into Spiderman as a young person. He will still occasionally talk about how Gwen Stacey's death was a gut punch. I convinced him to try Into the Spiderverse and he absolutely loved it. His birthday is coming up and I thought about buying him some comics with either Miles or SpiderGwen. Unfortunately figuring out the right comics is sort of a nightmare to someone (like me) who doesn't follow it all closely. Last time I tried this I saw a collection of Fantastic Four 1-30 and remembered that that was another one he really liked from back in the day but I didn't realize that "Ultimate Fantastic Four" was a very different thing from a reprint of the originals. Hoping to avoid the same kind of mistake this time around.

So looking for recommendations with some criteria:
-Good intro to the character(s). He has zero familiarity with the characters outside the movie.
-Self-contained. Minimum of crossovers or references to other things.
-Tells a complete(-ish) story. I know comics are serialized but I'd love to get a trade paperback (is that the right term for a collection of issues?) which has a solid arc.
-Stars either Miles or SpiderGwen, with a slight lean towards Gwen I think.
-Availability in Canadian online retailers is a huge bonus (Amazon, Chapters/Indigo, etc).
 

Taraqual

Words words words
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This is a bit of a gamble, but I'd see if you can find the Ultimate Spider-Man's "Death of Spider-Man" and then Ultimate Comics: Spider-Man vol. 1, maybe even vol. 2.

The Death trade has a prelude which can help set the stage, but I don't think it's necessary. Death has a couple WTF moments for casual comics readers (especially when it comes to the difference between Ult. Captain America and the rest of the Avengers vs. the MCU versions), but otherwise I think it holds up really well. And the last few issues are the right kind of gut punches. I mean, spoiler alerts are hard to justify in a comic that tells you what it's about on the cover.

Then UC: Spider-Man vol. 1 introduces Miles, his family situation, his powers, what Spider-Man and Peter Parker's death means to him, and so on. The next volume or two are pretty good at focusing on Miles--there's some other stuff from Peter's life, but it mostly makes sense. Eventually, though, as Marvel starts flailing around with the Ultimate Universe, stuff keeps cropping up in Miles' book, but he's still golden. There's a long-term thing I could warn you about, but that's not important unless you plan to keep collecting, especially Miles stuff.

The Miles books at first are similar enough to Spider-Verse that it doesn't take much work to see what's drawn from what. He's a kinda different kid than the Spider-Verse version (mostly he's more of a good kid than the sorta-rebellious guy in the movie), but still close to the same character.
 

Menocchio

Eccentric Thousandaire
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So Into The Spider-Verse was primarily a mashup of several stories, none of which are terrible choices for this situation.

Taraqual mentioned the stories that introduced Miles.

From there, I'd recommend Spider-Men, featuring the first meeting of Miles and 616 (that's the regular marvel continuity) Peter Parker. Peter stumbles into Miles' world and has to deal with a reality where his identity is widely known, because he dies as a teenager. He also meets that world's versions of May and Gwen. Don't worry too much about the baggage attached to 616 Peter, he's pretty much just being "normal" Spider-Man and should feel familiar to anyone used to the Romita-era Spidey.

Spider-Men II had some plot points the movie borrowed, but eh... It wasn't all that interesting as it's primarily about someone who isn't Spider-Man.

Spider-Verse
might be a bit dense for someone not immersed in modern Spider-Man lore, but it's a hoot. It's about all the Spider-People from across worlds fighting interdimensional vampires called the Inheritors. Every Spider-Man ever makes an appearance. Peter and Miles are there. Spider-Gwen and Peni Parker were created as part of this event. Noir and Ham have big roles. And the 60's Japanese TV Tokusatsu Spider-Man? Oh yeah. He's there, and he brought his giant robot.

And then there's Spider-Gwen which eventually became Radioactive Spider-Gwen. Mostly set in its own continuity (where all the male superheroes are absent or gender-swapped), it's probably the most accessible thing on this list. It's a lot of fun.
 

I. J. Betty

Registered User
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That you had to ask this blows my mind completely. How on Earth do they not have a book (or series of them) clearly aimed at the liked Spider-Man years ago, loved "Into the Spider-Verse" and wants more demographic?
 

Ghostwise

Mort aux cons
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That you had to ask this blows my mind completely. How on Earth do they not have a book (or series of them) clearly aimed at the liked Spider-Man years ago, loved "Into the Spider-Verse" and wants more demographic?
Experience shows, so far, that even monstrously successful movies have little impact on comics sales. The two media carry completely different connotations and signalling.

As to the OP, I'll also recommend the Ultimate Spider-Man: Ultimate Collections by Brian Bendis et al. Get the first volume for a taste to see if you like it. Bendis strives for a naturalistic dialogues style which makes a vocal minority cranky.
 

TrapperQ

Spiker (proof on request)
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Superior Foes of Spider-Man. It's about a bunch of Spider-Man's enemies coming together in a gang and robbing shit. It's funny as hell, has a great love for some very old Spider-Man foes, is a self contained story and the ony thing you need to know going in is 'That's not Spider-Man, that's Doctor Octopus pretending to be Spider-Man.'

I'd been avoiding Spider-Man for years, and that was the perfect re-introduction to his world.
 

Davies

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-Stars either Miles or SpiderGwen, with a slight lean towards Gwen I think.
... plenty of trade paperbacks of Gwen's series are available through amazon.ca, and aside from tie-ins to the comics Spider-Verse crossover, they're mostly self-contained. I think they are exactly what you are looking for.
 

Indivisible

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There's a new Spider-Gwen: Ghost Spider series by Seanan McGuire which is supposed to be pretty good, and it's new enough that their isn't a lot of continuity to go through.
 

King Snarf

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I enjoyed Spider Man's Tangled Web, a "Legends of the Dark Knight" type series that mainly featured one issue stories
 

Taraqual

Words words words
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Some of the classic stuff you can get as trades or on Comixology that I think are definitely worthwhile:

* Birth of Venom (when Spidey got the black costume that turned out to be an alien)
* Kraven's Last Hunt, kind of offbeat for the time, really blew my mind when I read it
* Death of the Stacys (sounds like where your dad left off, but it's worth revisiting--one of the times when Spidey really tackled some adult ideas)
* MacFarlane's early stuff, collected as Torment
* And I really liked most of J. Michael Straczynski's run, which are either in trades or omnibuses. Some of it's controversial, especially the Civil War tie-in and most especially the end of the run, where JMS is required by editorial to tear down most of the stuff he's built, but before you get to that point, it's an interesting look at Spider-Man as a kind of mythical figure. Also, several ideas from the JMS days are now pretty important to the current status quo, especially the Inheritors and the Spider-Verse.
 
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