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Common misconceptions about popular/famous stories

Solarn

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What bits of commonly repeated trivia about well-known stories can you think of that are completely false?

To start off, A Christmas Carol. Full adaptations have about a 50/50 chance of being accurate, but casual, pop-culture adaptations or reimaginings almost always fall into the same errors. Correcting them was my original impetus for this thread, but I figured, why not make it more general? It's always fun being a know-it-all about popular culture, and this way, more people can participate. Anyway, A Christmas Carol.

- Scrooge isn't greedy, he's a miser. He doesn't want more money, he squeezes everyone and refuses to give away anything, even for the sake of his own comfort.
- Relatedly, Scrooge isn't happy. He hates himself almost as much as he hates the rest of the world and he doesn't even take joy in hurting others. He just generally lives a miserable life.
- Scrooge doesn't try to hide from or escape the ghosts.
- Scrooge doesn't brush off the Ghost of Christmas Past. This is the really big mistake everyone makes, thinking that the first ghost essentially fails to affect Scrooge at all. He's shaken up by what he's shown and while he does "extinguish" the ghost to stop it reminding him of how far he's fallen, he can't forget what he's seen.
- Scrooge's fiancée breaking up with him wasn't the big turning point in his life. She broke up with him because he was already becoming cold, antisocial and miserly, which happened because he was a lonely, abused child who then started working in finance.
- The Ghost of Christmas Present showing Scrooge the two children, Ignorance and Want, isn't the shock that changes Scrooge's mind. It's simply an admonishment to a by then fully receptive Scrooge about his own previous rhetoric.
- Tiny Tim isn't some magic inspirational disabled kid who manages to hold the Cratchit family together by the sheer force of his optimism. They're all weirdly optimistic (which is implied to be partially an act, but partially real) and Tim doesn't stand out at all.
- The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come isn't the Grim Reaper.
- The future shown to Scrooge isn't an It's A Wonderful Life rip-off. It's not about how his absence will affect the world. The world will go on perfectly fine without him, apart from a few people's lives being marginally improved. In fact, the whole point (apart from the death of Tiny Tim, who Scrooge has grown attached to) is that if nothing changes, Scrooge will be dead by next Christmas and no one will care. It will be as if he had never existed.
 

Pip

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Mr. Darcy is not a wonderful romantic hero, he's a socially awkward introvert whose reaction to being pressured to dance with a pretty girl in a social event where he's out of his comfort zone is to become defensive and double-down until he's being actively insulting.
 

s/LaSH

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Captain Kirk doesn't really have much to do with seducing beautiful women; he's too busy running a starship. When he does try to have a relationship it fails so badly that he only discovers he has a son when investigating said son's academic career decades later. After being sucked into the Nexus, his "fondest imagination" involves living in a log cabin with a female companion, which he promptly ditches upon being told people need his help. It's not a very good extradimensional lotus-eater, is it?

Captain Kirk: Actually A Very Good Captain.

(Yes, he does actually have a lot of on-screen flirtation. Most of it ends in him walking away to focus on his job. In fact, when he leaves the Nexus, it's the second time he's ditched his unseen companion, because she's a recreation of the woman he left to return to Starfleet. The guy is career.)
 

Uncle Claudius

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Cardinal Richelieu isn't a treacherous villain, he's a devoted servant of France who happens to be on the other side of court politics from the Musketeers.

In fact, the book ends with him being so impressed at their effectiveness that he has D'Artagnan promoted.
 

Q99

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Captain Kirk doesn't really have much to do with seducing beautiful women; he's too busy running a starship. When he does try to have a relationship it fails so badly that he only discovers he has a son when investigating said son's academic career decades later. After being sucked into the Nexus, his "fondest imagination" involves living in a log cabin with a female companion, which he promptly ditches upon being told people need his help. It's not a very good extradimensional lotus-eater, is it?

Captain Kirk: Actually A Very Good Captain.

(Yes, he does actually have a lot of on-screen flirtation. Most of it ends in him walking away to focus on his job. In fact, when he leaves the Nexus, it's the second time he's ditched his unseen companion, because she's a recreation of the woman he left to return to Starfleet. The guy is career.)
It's McCoy who has the most romance in the show, iirc.
 

ANT Pogo

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The original Red Dawn isn't some superpatriotic Reaganite jingofest about how we should all fight those evil Commies and America, Fuck Yeah!

It's an anti-war about a group of unprepared teenagers who become guerilla fighters, and the violence and trauma gradually destroys them, leaving most of them dead and even the survivors mostly forgotten by their country when the war is over. And It's also about how the war affects the other side, with the violence that the invaders commit ( carried out by soldiers no older than the guerillas) affecting and traumatizing them as well (especially the Cuban commander).
 
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Icarium

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In spite of its flaws and popular hate by some, Weber's Manticore is actually a /social democracy/. Well, Social Democracy-With-Flaws-That-Get-Patched-As-The-Series-Progresses. It has free university, health care (including free prolong), a strong social safety net, and more. One can argue on whether it'd work as well as it does with its wars without the bullshit amount of wormholes in the system, but still. Haven, in spite of its rhetoric, is basically by author's statements, /Rome/. Right down to a 'bread ration' of sorts.

I'll second the Kirk thing. It's why the newer movies annoyed me. They doubled down on Kirk as a slutty womanizer thing.

Galileo was not a plucky scientist who was oh-so-meanly picked on by the Roman Catholic Church like much of fiction will tell you. The Pope liked him, and many church scientists believed in a Heliocentric model. He was arrested for basically -calling the Pope a moron- in a published book. The guy who took the opinion the Pope had was named Simplicio or something similar, and while the Pope didn't want to, politics made him react. So he ... put him a really nice house and made him promise to not do it again, basically.
 
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Coyote's Own

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Galileo was not a plucky scientist who was oh-so-meanly picked on by the Roman Catholic Church like much of fiction will tell you. The Pope liked him, and many church scientists believed in a Heliocentric model. He was arrested for basically -calling the Pope a moron- in a published book. The guy who took the opinion the Pope had was named Simplicio or something similar, and while the Pope didn't want to, politics made him react. So he ... put him a really nice house and made him promise to not do it again, basically.
THat's more for the "Thing in histiry taht you imagine wrong" over in Tang (And I belive it been brought up there).

Bruce Wayne doesn't juts dress up as Bat and beat up people to make Gotham and the world a better place.
Bruce Wayne is philanthropist who use the Wayne fortune to support social causes, trying to rebuild Gotham, and make it a less shitty place to live.
He invest heavily in project to resocialize criminals.
It mentioned it stories time and again, but really the focus since it's less exciting then crime fighting.
 

Icarium

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Yeah, I guess so. I just see it ALL THE TIME in fiction too. It was one thing I was so happy about with Flint's 163* series. He actually got it right. :)

And yeah, that too! I hate the "Batman is a rich dude who likes to beat on poor people!" meme.

The guy literally spends millions trying to fix Gotham. Frankly, he -would have- if not for comic book stasis with the amount he spends. I tend to lean with the theory that's brought forth sometimes that Gotham is cursed by some Lovecraftian monster or something. :)
 
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King Snarf

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The joke with Mr. Magoo isn't that he's blind. He could see fine if he wore his glasses, but he doesn't, because he's a handsome leading man (in his mind) and handsome leading men don't wear glasses.
 
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