• The Infractions Forum is available for public view. Please note that if you have been suspended you will need to open a private/incognito browser window to view it.

Criticism that misses the point

Antendren

Member
RPGnet Member
Validated User
There was an episode of Voltron Force where the episode's monster would attack during Voltron's transformation sequence, knocking the lions out of alignment so they couldn't form up. The heroes had to find a faster way to transform.
 

Q99

Genderpunk
Staff member
Moderator
RPGnet Member
Validated User
There was an episode of Power Rangers where one of them used the transformation pyrotechnics to wipe out a group of enemies that were standing behind them.

There's definitely room for playing around with using transformation sequences being just showing them as instant or protected. Cutey Honey's transformations were in real time, and she could be attacked or attack during them. In one version of Guyver the baddies stopped the hero from transforming by handcuffing him to his girlfriend, because his transformation surrounds him with a destructive sphere.

Someone could get a lot of mileage out of the transformation just plain being the attack. Western superheroes stories hit different beats than magical girls, but Billy Batson has used lightning bolt as an attack when he didn't just have lightning powers. The risk of attacking versus becoming powerless is certainly something to play with.
The train-based season of super sentai has the transformation involve one of those 'keep back from the track' warning zones and if a villain doesn't step back they get hit.
 

Invertin

Registered User
Validated User
The real advantage humans have over animals isn't individual intelligence, it's language. We can communicate incredibly complicated ideas to eachother. A dog can't learn nuclear fission, sure, but a hypothetical magic dog that could completely understand the english language as well as any random human might be able to have the basics explained to them.

Language + writing + thousands of years of iteration on previously-established concepts communicated to new people via language is how we got to all our advanced sciences. Shoulders of giants and all that stuff. Maybe there's a limit to that and maybe there's a limit to the ability of an individual human to learn all of this, but what an individual human could learn on their own has never been the point.
 

DarkStarling

Brilliantly Crazed
Validated User
The real advantage humans have over animals isn't individual intelligence, it's language. We can communicate incredibly complicated ideas to eachother. A dog can't learn nuclear fission, sure, but a hypothetical magic dog that could completely understand the english language as well as any random human might be able to have the basics explained to them.

Language + writing + thousands of years of iteration on previously-established concepts communicated to new people via language is how we got to all our advanced sciences. Shoulders of giants and all that stuff. Maybe there's a limit to that and maybe there's a limit to the ability of an individual human to learn all of this, but what an individual human could learn on their own has never been the point.
Yeah. This is also why I’m so fascinated by the research into crowd intelligence. We’ve always cloudsourced our brains anyway, now we’re learning how that works and how to do it better.
 

Vorpeseda

Floof
Validated User
It’s a pet peeve of mine when people make fun of transformation sequences in Sailor Moon, etc. Why the villains don’t just shoot them in the middle of it, say.

Nine times out of ten, it’s explicit that the time is subjective and it actually happens instantly. Ah well.
Amusingly, in some shows, the actual activation of the transformation sequence can be interrupted by the villians. Super Sentai and Kamen Rider have many fights where the heroes fight untransformed until they get an opening where they can activate their transformation.

The first Pretty Cure series had another take on it. The transformations occur in a column of energy so bright that nobody would be genre blind enough to actually try sticking their hand into.

I do like the idea of a transformation sequence showing everything else around them moving in slow motion, demonstrating the transformation in detail, but showing that only a fraction of a second just passed for real.
 

R-90-2

Can it be SNEK TIEM?
Validated User
I do like the idea of a transformation sequence showing everything else around them moving in slow motion, demonstrating the transformation in detail, but showing that only a fraction of a second just passed for real.
There's actually a recent show where there's a little timer appears in the corner during the transformation sequence. When the sequence is over, the clock has stopped at 1/100th of a second.
 

narm00

Registered User
Validated User
There's actually a recent show where there's a little timer appears in the corner during the transformation sequence. When the sequence is over, the clock has stopped at 1/100th of a second.
Machikado Mazoku, currently airing. It's a slice-of-life story about a newbie, and very weak, descendant of the Dark Clan who's trying to defeat a magical girl to break the curse on her family. Except the magical girl she's found a) is retired, b) easily outpowers her anyway, and c) has essentially taken her under her wing.
 

Count_Zero

Game Master
Validated User
So, one other criticism of Evangelion I've encountered that misses the point: The Strict Doylist interpretations of Evangelion - i.e. interpretations which assume the adults (except the Eva pilots), are acting with perfect self knowledge and a view they express is the view of the author, i.e. "The description of the Magi as the three parts of Femininity represents Anno's personal views - and Ritsuko or her mother haven't internalized destructive negative viewpoints on Femininity."

It ignores one of the fundamental points of the show - the adults in this world have just as many psychological issues as the kids do, and have internalized just as many harmful and destructive ideas as the kids, and they manifest that in a variety of ways - just like the kids do.
 

Breogan

Member
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Yea, one "lesson" of Evangelion, if you think about it, is basically "we are all winging it, kid". Some are winging it trying to pretend to be mature and functional human beings, some are winging it trying to be incredibly masterminds pulling some schemes of global domination, but everybody is winging it and dealing with their frustrations, needs, hangups and all that as best or worst as they can.
 
Top Bottom