• The Infractions Forum is available for public view. Please note that if you have been suspended you will need to open a private/incognito browser window to view it.

arthurdiennet

New member
Hey all,

So, relatively new DM (only been doing this for 2 years and, let's be honest, that's not long at all.)
I'll cut to the chase: Should I use Dungeon Crawl Classics or Lamentations Of The Flame Princess as my ruleset if I want to run a bunch of LOTFP, DCC and Labyrinth Lord modules (Mostly B/X ruleset?)
I'm leaning towards Dungeon Crawl Classics.

I'm moving the group over from Cthulhu (which I felt was very restrictive for me as a DM, but, my players really enjoyed, unfortunately. They loved roll-under and the PC weakness/horror vibe.)
I wanna knock it outta the park with this system change. I've been reading DCC, LOTFP, Into the Odd, LL and even Dungeon World and Burning Wheel for feature inspiration.

I think I love the OSR, but, I'm worried that I may be falling into a pie-in-the-sky hippie fantasy without realizing the trouble that might be in store for me?

Any ideas? Opinions? Anything at all from other DMs will probably prove extremely helpful.
 

Schleiermacher

Registered User
Validated User
DCC is more "classic" OSR/D&D clone, LOFP is more horror-influenced. Both have the same sort of "zero to hero" class progressions, with very vulnerable starting characters. In both, characters level out of their vulnerability to a point, but you'd have to get to very high level before you can start being comfortable with danger, and level gain is slow. So both systems should work well for your group in that respect.

Notably, spellcasters in DCC have access to more, and more straightforward, combat magic. Magic in LOFP, although powerful, is more utility-focused, and often requires lengthy preparations, expensive components or significant risk to use. I've had a lot of fun playing a Magic-User in the ruleset, but it's definitely a matter of taste. You will not be casually throwing spells around for a long time, if ever.

I really like the LOFP rules and corebooks, but if you want to run LOFP adventures I would make sure to read them thoroughly ahead of time and adapt them to your group. Many of them contain pointless over-the-top gore or other "shocking" content, or arbitrary "retire your character" death-or-worse traps. However despite their reputation, the LOFP core rules do not in any way encourage that sort of thing. In fact I think the GM advice they contain is very good, and usefully applicable far beyond running LOFP itself.

So in summary, both should work for you, but I would recommend LOFP.

In the interest of full disclousure though, I am much less familiar with DCC.
 

Gorilla Zod

I can see for miles and miles
Validated User
I'll just add that DCC is mechanically a little different, iirc, as it is based on 3rd edition D&D, again if my memory serves me. F'rex, using ascending target numbers for checks while LOFP has its own pretty nifty skill system. I agree with everything Schleiermacher said above, though i'd add that DCC is a generally more complex game with more moving parts, and when they're all working together things can turn pretty gonzo pretty fast. LOFP is much more grounded and arguably more CoC than DCC, which is not a system I'd use for anything like a fantasy-horror game.
 

g33k

Registered User
Validated User
IIRC, DCC uses a bunch of funky dice; like... funkier than usual for RPGs. d3/d5/d7/d14/d16/d24/d30. In addition to the ones you already know.

Some find this an asset, some hate it, some are "ok, whatever..." Basically, the whole spectrum of opinion.
Before going all-in on DCC, find out how your group feels about this issue!

===

One other idea for you -- look at BRP-based fantasy games. Runequest has both a glorious new edition, and a very-retro oldschool one, available now from Chaosium. The BRP "Big Gold Book" and its slim Quickstart (free in PDF) are also available. d101 Games has a variant. TheDesignMechanism has a variant. Cakebread&Walton has a variant. Alephtar has a variant. All of them are rather similar to one another, and you will quickly learn how to borrow features from one variant into another (if that appeals to you).

Why do I suggest those games? Because the beloved Call of Cthulhu rules are yet another BRP variant!
 

arthurdiennet

New member
IIRC, DCC uses a bunch of funky dice; like... funkier than usual for RPGs. d3/d5/d7/d14/d16/d24/d30. In addition to the ones you already know.

Some find this an asset, some hate it, some are "ok, whatever..." Basically, the whole spectrum of opinion.
Before going all-in on DCC, find out how your group feels about this issue!

===

One other idea for you -- look at BRP-based fantasy games. Runequest has both a glorious new edition, and a very-retro oldschool one, available now from Chaosium. The BRP "Big Gold Book" and its slim Quickstart (free in PDF) are also available. d101 Games has a variant. TheDesignMechanism has a variant. Cakebread&Walton has a variant. Alephtar has a variant. All of them are rather similar to one another, and you will quickly learn how to borrow features from one variant into another (if that appeals to you).

Why do I suggest those games? Because the beloved Call of Cthulhu rules are yet another BRP variant!
Oh man, these are already great suggestions!
And thank you, g33k, how could I have overlooked Runequest?
Have you used RQ regularly? Thoughts? The character sheet seems kind of awesome.
 

arthurdiennet

New member
I'll just add that DCC is mechanically a little different, iirc, as it is based on 3rd edition D&D, again if my memory serves me. F'rex, using ascending target numbers for checks while LOFP has its own pretty nifty skill system. I agree with everything Schleiermacher said above, though i'd add that DCC is a generally more complex game with more moving parts, and when they're all working together things can turn pretty gonzo pretty fast. LOFP is much more grounded and arguably more CoC than DCC, which is not a system I'd use for anything like a fantasy-horror game.
So, in your opinion, running Veins of the Earth or Death Frost Doom with DCC probably just will not work?
 

arthurdiennet

New member
DCC is more "classic" OSR/D&D clone, LOFP is more horror-influenced. Both have the same sort of "zero to hero" class progressions, with very vulnerable starting characters. In both, characters level out of their vulnerability to a point, but you'd have to get to very high level before you can start being comfortable with danger, and level gain is slow. So both systems should work well for your group in that respect.

Notably, spellcasters in DCC have access to more, and more straightforward, combat magic. Magic in LOFP, although powerful, is more utility-focused, and often requires lengthy preparations, expensive components or significant risk to use. I've had a lot of fun playing a Magic-User in the ruleset, but it's definitely a matter of taste. You will not be casually throwing spells around for a long time, if ever.

I really like the LOFP rules and corebooks, but if you want to run LOFP adventures I would make sure to read them thoroughly ahead of time and adapt them to your group. Many of them contain pointless over-the-top gore or other "shocking" content, or arbitrary "retire your character" death-or-worse traps. However despite their reputation, the LOFP core rules do not in any way encourage that sort of thing. In fact I think the GM advice they contain is very good, and usefully applicable far beyond running LOFP itself.

So in summary, both should work for you, but I would recommend LOFP.

In the interest of full disclousure though, I am much less familiar with DCC.
This sounds awesome. Can you give me an example of your favorite times as a LOTFP spellcaster?
 

Gorilla Zod

I can see for miles and miles
Validated User
I'd prolly say no, unless you ran them as funnels, and funnels are very different from "standard" scenarios. And if you have level 1+ characters, DCC's Deed Die for Fighters and the rules for clerics and wizards can make characters seem a lot larger than life, if you see what I mean.
 

Knaight

Registered User
Validated User
DCC also has the advantage of not being headed by an infamous douchebag, so there's that.
 

g33k

Registered User
Validated User
...
And thank you, g33k, how could I have overlooked Runequest?
Have you used RQ regularly? Thoughts? The character sheet seems kind of awesome.
RQ is, overall, probably my favorite-ever fantasy RPG (though if you ask me tomorrow, I might claim Ars Magica, and point to the day AFTER, when it'll be RQ again...).

The new RQ is mostly based upon the RQ2 / RQClassic mechanical chassis, with some notable RQ3'isms (and the new Passions&Runes rules (with Skill-Augmenting) largely inspired by Pendragon rules). This edition really has a LOT of baked-in Glorantha, so if you love that world it's kind of the best-ever version of Runequest.

If Glorantha ain't your cuppa, then the new edition probably isn't for you.


In that case, look to d101Games' OpenQuest if you like a simpler ruleset, or TheDesignMechanism's Mythras for more crunchy tactico-strategic rules; both offer multiple alternate settings. Then there's Cakebread&Walton's Renaissance game, which is a bit more narrow-focus (I bet you'll never guess what tech/era it is! ☺ but supports everything in that era from gritty historical muck to Clockwork Cthulhutech to gonzo Pirates&Dragons), and Alephtar's Revolution D100 for a modern innovative take on the venerable ol' BRP game...

Or, of course, just look at BRP itself. Start with the (free in PDF) Quickstart mechanics, and add whatever elaborations your group wants, whenever they want to add them.



And yes, the new RQG character sheet IS awesome (there's an even-prettier "artisan" sheet available in the GM Screen Pack, btw).
 
Top Bottom