• The Infractions Forum is available for public view. Please note that if you have been suspended you will need to open a private/incognito browser window to view it.

Decent second introduction to RPGs?

Motorskills

Member
RPGnet Member
Validated User
This. I know Motorskills said setting/genre didn't matter, but I'd still figure that out before suggesting systems.

Additionally, a more tricky question might be "how much are the players willing to learn a new system?". It comes up time and again on these forums*. A large number of RPGers are either uninterested in reading the rules for a new system, or have time constraints that make reading new rules difficult.

* most recently on the "Why is it so difficult to get people to play anything besides D&D?" thread.

""
Yeah, I'm not saying genre won't matter, but everyone will immediately grok those, throwing out the different mechanical options for consideration not so much.

I'm actually hoping to give Swords of the Serpentine a spin, because I love the basic premise of GUMSHOE, very different from D&D (and because "still fantasy," as suggested above).

I'm a little wary though, since my grasp of GUMSHOE is shaky, and I've only skimmed the playtest docs. Piratecat Piratecat do you think Serpentine would be worth trying, or too risky with this group?
 

Motorskills

Member
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Additionally, a more tricky question might be "how much are the players willing to learn a new system?". It comes up time and again on these forums*. A large number of RPGers are either uninterested in reading the rules for a new system, or have time constraints that make reading new rules difficult.

* most recently on the "Why is it so difficult to get people to play anything besides D&D?" thread.

""
This is actually what I will be starting with, if they aren't interested in trying something new, it will save time!
 
Last edited:

Agemegos

All out of spoons
RPGnet Member
Validated User
My advice in this situation is to make sure that you give them something that D&D can't do. If you run a fantasy dungeon-crawl, even if you had mechanics that were clearly better than D&D in a way that mattered to your players, you would have to struggle with the obvious thought "why do we gotta learn new mechanics to do something that we already do just fine?". So sugar-coat the change of mechanics with a good long step away from fantasy and away from the series of combat encounters. Further, I recommend shifting to something set in either the real world or a very familiar sci-fi setting, so that your players don't have to learn any world lore before they get into the swing of the thing.

I suggest that you might do well with James Bond 007 or its modern retro-clone Classified. Hand out pre-generated characters to grease the way in, and run something short, boppy, and sodden with appropriate tropes. Make the first session easy, fun, and obviously different from what you'd do with D&D.
 

Piratecat

Registered User
Validated User
I'm actually hoping to give Swords of the Serpentine a spin, because I love the basic premise of GUMSHOE, very different from D&D (and because "still fantasy," as suggested above).

I'm a little wary though, since my grasp of GUMSHOE is shaky, and I've only skimmed the playtest docs. Piratecat Piratecat do you think Serpentine would be worth trying, or too risky with this group?
I'll be doing at least one actual play recording, and I think that'll help -- I can explain the core rules quite quickly. Ignore any rule in the playtest doc that seems too finicky. (I'm probably changing it anyways.) Be a little liberal with the Refresh tokens to start, so folks don't stress about the action economy.

The biggest change from D&D is (a) the heroes are really competent at the start, good at their job and able to affect the world around them; and (b) it's sometimes weird as hell for the players to help define the world. Takes a game or two of practice before they embrace it. I have a round of defining questions ("What time of year is it? What's the weather like? Who's currently trying to kill you, and why?") to help get players in the right mindset. But once they grok that, I'm finding it's a great introduction; new players in the games I've run have felt powerful and have consistently had a huge amount of fun.
 

artikid

passerby
Validated User
Barbarians of Lemuria/Everywhen
Openquest/River of Heaven/Call of cthulhu
Savage World, any flavor
 

Octopus Prime

Retired User
I'd definitely vote anything Powered by the Apocalypse. It's both Very Different from D&D and also very easy to wrap your head around.
 

HDimagination

Building something out of Scrap
Validated User
It's a shame, about 20 years ago, I would have suggested West End Games D6 Star Wars for this sort of thing. I don't think that D20 Star Wars or FFG Star Wars fits the same niche.

The 30th anniversary books are out there now I guess, but the Revised 2nd edition was by far the better game.
 

caledoniaman

Registered User
Validated User
Dungeon Crawl Classics is a great game to wean them from D&D to.

It's retro in terms of the feel of the game but it's not a retroclone per se. It's a modern d20 game with new mechanics so it won't be as terrifyingly alien to the modern 5e player. What it's very good at though is emulating that old 1980s dungeon crawl experience without the confusing and poor mechanics of the original editions.
 
Top Bottom