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Disney all-in on Star Wars a mistake?

WorldSaverInc

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So my wife and I (no kids) are planning a trip to Disney World, and some of the headlines are that that the new Star Wars Land in DisneyLand doesn't have the numbers expected as does the Star Wars theme land in Disney World might be softer than expected. I am reading articles about the Last Jedi and issues with Episode 9 and individuals not wanting to be a part of it.

I think Disney Gambled that Star Wars would just be as big or bigger than Princess-line or even Marvel. I think Disney while not fully regretting it, both Last Jedi and The Force Awakens did very well in the box office, but I think they might need to re-evaluate unlike the Marvel purchase.

Star Wars as in the first 3 movies are incrediably popular and are a pop-culture phenomenon. I will not doubt that. It has a lot of dedicated fans and more casual fans. However, I am not sure how much that expands out to the universe as a whole. It could just be the first trilogy, but how much of that translates to the universe as a whole. I think this is a key difference between Marvel and Star Wars.

Marvel has characters, but also a lot more content for its universe and media to draw upon. Countless characters both minor, major, heroic, and villainous as well as countless plots both good and bad to spruce up or adapt. It has had more media success in spin-offs and creations and can reach into various points in basically a full universe. It basically has depth and a lot of depth to mine.

I am not sure Star Wars (or at least the popular bits) has that much depth to mine. The magic system was old and not necessarily well thought out and doesn't have decades to work with as Disney tossed out EU stuff. I think Star Wars could have the depth, but it would need writers and other things to actually explore the universe OUTSIDE of Pulp Stories and storylines.

To compare it to Star Trek for instance. The two universes are different and are populated different. Star Trek has a structure where you can go to a new world and see interesting dramatic endeavors, mostly moral choices rather than action adventure, but it can have action adventure. There isn't as much content in Star Trek either truth be told, but there are ways like Star Wars to create it. Go to new worlds with different characters and see interactions. Orville has shown it can be done and done well. The Star Trek model has room for advancement outside the characters. However, Star Wars CAN, but hasn't outside of animated shows (which I hear are pretty good) or novels (which are now ignored). Rogue One was a good start, but it again centered on the Core Trilogy, which I am unsure can sustain it Star Wars interest beyond itself.

In other words, Disney has to put more effort into Star Wars to maintain it outside the main trilogy, but currently has bet big on Star Wars. I am thinking that it was a mistake, because Star Wars hasn't generated as much content to draw upon to do so, and it is hard work.

Thoughts?
 

Sabermane

Proud Fianna knight of hope and peace
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*looks at the four billion world wide made from the new movies*

I think they're ok. Worst case is that Star Wars Land with it's 200 dollar lightsabers goes the way of Captain EO.
 

Dave999

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I think that it's made a massive amount of wealth from it already, more than the ridiculous price they paid for it.

Also, the Star Wars EU proves there's a lot of material to go for other movies.
 

Stingray

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The problem is not Star Wars itself. It is how Disney handled the Star Wars property. Not having a plan for the new trilogy (or having a plan and abandoning it halfway through) is not how you can do this in an MCU world. Especially if your first new movie is just a greatest hits album without any actual new content and you already blew your load with a Deathstar++.

I am sure, you can do interesting things with the material. (For example i would love to see a movie from the perspective of Admiral Thrawn. Remnants of the Empire, etc.). But how they are doing things, Episode 9 will probably be about blowing up a superweapon again.
 

Gideon

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Not sure that they particularly need to draw upon existing content. They just need to make decent movies. There's loads of goodwill for SW movies and while a lot of people will watch anything from that universe (I will and I don't really consider myself a fan), a lot of other people will go as long as they hear it's half decent.

What I think they need to do is not bother making sure that each movie is so SW that it practically re-shoots scenes and plots from older movies. They should consider the whole universe so pretty much any adventure movie that would be decent set in our universe could be decent set in the SW universe.
 

Grumpygoat

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Star Wars is an absurdly limited setting that may theoretically be wide in scope, but practically is highly narrow due to fan focus on the main cast. Even the EU was highly incestuous, dealing strongly with the original cast and related characters. And when the setting didn't deal with those characters, it borrowed heavily from the themes and tone of the original movies - Knights of the Old Republic is a hero's journey that ends with the redemption of a fallen loved one and the destruction of a super-weapon.

Because of this tonal and character straitjacket, there's not much room to expand. I suspect that Solo would have been a great opportunity to try escaping from it - play up the comedy. Go for something different. The problem is that, due to decades of fiction not doing this, there's now a fanbase that's deadset against change. Just look to the reaction to The Last Jedi - it tried mixing things up. The protagonist? A nobody. Luke Skywalker? Rather than some badass super-Jedi, he's suicidally depressed. This won over critics and a large part of the audience - it's my favorite Star Wars movie - but there's an audience segment out there that hates it with a passion. So trying something different backfired. I'm sure this is causing some people at Disney headaches: wanting to do something different from what came before, but being hedged in to rehash old material. And getting dinged no matter which of the two they choose.

Additionally, as important as China is to the movie market (and presumably other merchandising, be it theme parks or toys), that Star Wars doesn't have the same cultural imprint there lessens its overall value. Not completely, but enough to matter.

Disney's already re-evaluating the property. It's moved away from one Star Wars movie a year. I suspect it's changed up a few other things, too, which we may not be aware of. That said, I think Disney's still happy with the franchise. It's just not quite the juggernaut Disney expected it to be. But not being Marvel or Disney princesses isn't so bad, in light of how ridiculously lucrative both properties are.
 
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Dave999

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Star Wars is an absurdly limited setting that may theoretically be wide in scope, but practically is highly narrow due to fan focus on the main cast. Even the EU was highly incestuous, dealing strongly with the original cast and related characters. And when the setting didn't deal with those characters, it borrowed heavily from the themes and tone of the original movies - Knights of the Old Republic is a hero's journey that ends with the redemption of a fallen loved one and the destruction of a super-weapon.
I feel like that misses a Marvel movie is, "A lovable protagonist fights a supervillain tied to their origin story."

People want to see evil wizards and blown up superweapons.
 

Stingray

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🔴 Warning + Threadban
The problem is that, due to decades of fiction not doing this, there's now a fanbase that's deadset on change. Just look to the reaction to The Last Jedi - it tried mixing things up. The protagonist? A nobody. Luke Skywalker? Rather than some badass super-Jedi, he's suicidally depressed. This won over critics and a large part of the audience - it's my favorite Star Wars movie - but there's an audience segment out there that hates it with a passion. So trying something different backfired. I'm sure this is causing some people at Disney headaches: wanting to do something different from what came before, but being hedged in to rehash old material. And getting dinged no matter which of the two they choose.
I don't hate The Last Jedi because it tried to be different. I hate it (with a passion), because it get's rid of everything, that looked promising in the previous move and replaced it with nothing. It's a dead end and provides absolutely nothing, which i would be looking forward to in Episode 9. (Which i will probably skip for that reason.)
Hobo-Luke was not an uninteresting concept. The execution just was disappointing.
If it was a standalone movie, i would have been fine with it. But it destroyed the characters established in Episode 7 and ruined most plot points that would have been resolved in Episode 9. Episode 8 managed to retractively ruin it's predecessor and makes it almost impossible for it's sequel to unfuck this mess. This is quite an acomplishment, to be honest.
 

Grumpygoat

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I don't hate The Last Jedi because it tried to be different. I hate it (with a passion), because it get's rid of everything, that looked promising in the previous move and replaced it with nothing. It's a dead end and provides absolutely nothing, which i would be looking forward to in Episode 9. (Which i will probably skip for that reason.)
Hobo-Luke was not an uninteresting concept. The execution just was disappointing.
Specific points and criticisms are better than broad, general commentary. Without that specificity, "getting rid of everything that looked promising" mostly brings to mind getting rid of the Emperor stand-in, getting rid of the "chosen one from a secret, special lineage," and otherwise playing into my point about how The Last Jedi did something different and was met with resistance.
 

KaijuGooGoo

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So my wife and I (no kids) are planning a trip to Disney World, and some of the headlines are that that the new Star Wars Land in DisneyLand doesn't have the numbers expected as does the Star Wars theme land in Disney World might be softer than expected.
I will be happy for the numbers to stay low until after the first week of March, when we're going.
 
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