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Disney all-in on Star Wars a mistake?

komradebob

Registered User
Validated User
Which, again, would seem to be information that could, if not should, have been included in the movies rather than ancillary sources. The same applies to the post after yours.
It isn't like the US launched major naval offensives on Dec 9, 1941.

Maybe they figured pop culture/historical comparisons could fill in some of the blanks without a massive need to explain the naval situation.

It's only been a couple of days between the two films, IIRC.
 

Qwa'ha Xahn

High King of the Known Worlds
Validated User
Which, again, would seem to be information that could, if not should, have been included in the movies rather than ancillary sources. The same applies to the post after yours.
Why? Do we need to know how the Emperor took over the galaxy in the original trilogy? It was supposedly an ancient republic that ran things for thousands of years. We’re supposed to just accept that one guy took over? Or do we just accept it, because that’s what the story says, and it’s not like we don’t have historical examples where similar things happened (Rome, etc.). We have historical examples for the New Republic (a central government too weak to really do the job born of a fear of tyranny) in the Articles of Confederation.
 

JediSoth

ENnies Staff
Validated User
Star Wars has always suffered from an excess of Tell instead of Show and relied on the EU to fill in gaps that really should have been included in the films.
 

Nightward

IntranationalManOfMisery
Banned
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Why? Do we need to know how the Emperor took over the galaxy in the original trilogy? It was supposedly an ancient republic that ran things for thousands of years. We’re supposed to just accept that one guy took over? Or do we just accept it, because that’s what the story says, and it’s not like we don’t have historical examples where similar things happened (Rome, etc.). We have the same historical examples for the New Republic (a central government too weak to really do the job born of a fear of tyranny) in the Articles of Confederation.
They don't tell us exactly how it happened, but enough detail is provided for us to understand what's going on. No such context is provided in the new films. And in terms of the real world, we can see where things came from. If they weren't going to address the situation directly in the movie, the title crawl could at least have laid more groundwork.
 

Grumpygoat

Registered User
Validated User
The battle for endor was incredibly dark where they killed off most of the past protagonists and had a descent action scene in the third act.
...what? Not a single protagonist dies in the Battle of Endor. The Battle of Endor involves a bunch of tiny bear people with spears somehow overcoming an army of better armed, physically stronger, better prepared soldiers. It's not dark, it's something out of a children's cartoon. That's why ewoks get hated on.
 

Menocchio

Eccentric Thousandaire
Validated User
They don't tell us exactly how it happened, but enough detail is provided for us to understand what's going on.
I understood it perfectly. I honestly don't understand the problem. The First Order are neo-fascists modeled after the Empire. They are in a state cold war with the Republic, and the Republic's proxies in the Resistance are fighting them directly but even they seem ignorant as to how powerful the FO has become. Using the Resistance as a pretext, the FO declares open war on the Republic and Starkiller Base fires on the Hosnian System, destroying the Republic's capital and fleet (a huge portion of it, anyway). Before the base can fire again, the Resistance infiltrates, takes out the planetary shields, and destroys the base. That's the first movie.

The First Order's fleet (a huge portion of it anyway) attacks the Resistance as it evacuates from its base, but they escape. Using new technology, the FO gives chase and after an initial successful strike settles into a conservative tactic of waiting for the Resistance to simply run out of gas. This allows the Resistance time to find a planet they can stealthily evacuate all personnel to and signal and await aid from the remaining free systems. Unfortunately, an unauthorized mission alerts the FO to the evacuation and most of the Resistance is killed, with the remainder being saved by the most badass thing to ever happen in a Star War destroying the flagship. The planetary systems do not answer, and the Resistance survivors only escape with the distraction provided by the second most badass thing to ever happen in a Star War. That's the second movie.

The way I see it, there's two, maybe three, "gimmes" in there. The first is the initial setup of the First Order vs the Republic. I don't know exactly what happened, but I understand the situation. At least as far as it needs to be explained to make the rest of the plot and the character reactions make sense. I'm able to buy into that setup just as I was with the Empire in the first trilogy. The missing details don't impact my understanding or enjoyment.

The second is the appearance of the FO fleet at the beginning of the second movie. Their existence is somewhat surprising because if they were around you'd think they'd have better defended Starkiller Base. Still, it's at least established that Starkiller Base had a planetary shield they assumed would be sufficient. And also that Snoke wasn't present, and that Kylo escaped so it's given that they had some assets somewhere. So I'm able to forgive the contrivance.

And the possible third is the non-answer from the local systems. But that's more of a mystery to be answered in the third movie.

...what? Not a single protagonist dies in the Battle of Endor. The Battle of Endor involves a bunch of tiny bear people with spears somehow overcoming an army of better armed, physically stronger, better prepared soldiers. It's not dark, it's something out of a children's cartoon. That's why ewoks get hated on.
Not the Battle of Endor, the Battle for Endor. Which does begin with a huge amount of death for a kid's movie.
 

Kevin Mowery

WAUGH!
Validated User
In non-why-didn't-people-like-The Last Jedi news, and maybe back to the original point about the parks and whatnot, Disney has announced that the Rise of the Resistance ride will be opening December 5 in Disney World, and not until January 17, 2020 in Disneyland.

Which kind of pushes my planning for my next Disneyland trip back a couple of months. I'd wanted to go when all the rides were open, but previous projections had been that they'd be open by the end of the year in both parks.
 

Lewd Beholder

Member
RPGnet Member
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...what? Not a single protagonist dies in the Battle of Endor. The Battle of Endor involves a bunch of tiny bear people with spears somehow overcoming an army of better armed, physically stronger, better prepared soldiers. It's not dark, it's something out of a children's cartoon. That's why ewoks get hated on.
They killed off the entire family from caravan of courage in about the first 10 minutes of the battle of endor.
 

Danger Mouse

Social Justice Mouse
Validated User
What people were hoping for was maybe 10-15 minutes about it during The Force Awakens, which could have been easily integrated into character development for Kylo and Finn, plus some information about what it means for the New Republic.
It doesn't even have to take that much screen time. This scene from A New Hope tells the audience what they need to know about the current state of the galaxy, while also establishing stakes for the rest of the movie and providing characterization for Vader, and is only a little over 2 minutes long. TFA really could have used a scene like that, IMO.
 
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