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Disney Cancels Original Films, Orders More Reboots from Fox

Qwa'ha Xahn

High King of the Known Worlds
Validated User
Who is going to topple them at this point? They have a near-monopoly on modern blockbusters, and their strategy of going all-in on tentpoles built around established IP has them on track for yet another year of record breaking profits. The more likely outcome is not that some other studio knocks Disney off their perch with a slate of original movies Disney wouldn't make,
I don’t mean “time on top” as somebody outcompetes them. I mean that, as a near monopoly, Disney might get caught wrong-footed on trends and have nowhere to go but to spin back down into a more free market. If everybody (and Disney’s big enough now that they darn near count as “everybody” all on their own) makes one type of movie and then people decide they don’t like that type of movie... that’s a big drop in income. If there’s competitors, there’s a path to go down- “well they’re doing westerns and making money, let’s do westerns”. But if there’s nobody else, I’d think the temptation would be “people don’t like movies anymore, time to downsize” and maybe spin some of these studios back off, divesting themselves of the pseudo-monopoly they built.

Disney will eventually strangle the blockbuster industry to death. It will burn its own fingers too, but by that point, everyone else will be a smouldering corpse.
More or less this, in other words. :) Only I’m not quite as grim on the outcome.
 

Dweller in Darkness

Excelsior
Validated User
This could also be a studio playing things conservatively with a newly acquired product. That said, their recent round of reboots combined with this news points pretty strongly against that.
 

Isator Levie

Registered User
Validated User
In addition to the questions of monopolies, greatly reduced film slates and the long-term prospects of bubbles, I've also a mind for the types of movies that define the modern blockbuster that so many resources are being poured into.

I've enjoyed the Marvel films on the whole, but I do look back with a bit of fondness on the time when a blockbuster could be about a few guys from a small town going after a shark. There is a bit of scale creep to the modern blockbuster, tied in with that impulse to make them more and more expensive in pursuit of ever larger box office returns, that I find a bit unfortunate.

Although I wonder about comparisons to similar situations from prior eras such as the collapse of the road show musical, since Disney's increasing hold on the market might portend scenarios in which they can't properly fail because consumers have few to no alternatives or else that fail causes cascading disaster in the Hollywood film industry.
 

Menocchio

Eccentric Thousandaire
Validated User
There's some reports that some Disney executives are worried about Fox Searchlight releasing Jojo Rabbit, Taika Waititi's satirical film about a young boy in WWII Germany who has Adolf Hitler as his best friend, and how it will reflect on the Disney brand. Jojo Rabbit's admittedly a rather provocative film but the very idea that an indie movie released through Fox Searchlight has to conform to Disney's overall branding strategy is worrying to me.

If Disney is using their and Fox's name to only milk their existing IP, and then they make sure that the smaller original films they do distribute only conform to their marketing strategy, then they're pretty thoroughly strangling the medium. Look for Fox Searchlight to get downsized next.
 

Dawgstar

Member
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I wonder what stuff is going on at the highest levels of Disney Studios. Like if whomever's in charge has issued an edict of only things that could lead to another MCU (which even Star Wars hasn't done), possibly forgetting that nothing else has Kevin Feige's vision propelling it. Or to put another way Disney is just not interested in good single films, no matter how successful they might be.
 

awesomeocalypse

Registered User
Validated User
I saw Once Upon A Time in Hollywood recently, and found it to be flawed but ended up enjoying it a lot anyway, and I honestly think part of it was that an original, non-sci-fi/fantasy movie starring a bunch of huge movie stars and given a wide release in the summer (i.e. not a pseudo-indie or holiday oscar bait, just "hey here's an original story starring some great actors and we're actually gonna treat it like a big goddamn movie instead of some niche thing for urbanite film buffs") increasingly feels like a novelty in the modern movie landscape. And even OUATIH only got that treatment because Tarantino is an established brand in his own way. I suspect that we're not far from the point where these kinds of storytelling experiences are entirely relegated to streaming, at least for anyone who doesn't live close to a fairly arts-y theater, and while that may well reflect how audiences in general want to see this sort of content it's something I'm personally going to mourn. I love the MCU and Star Wars as much as the next guy, but there are a lot of others kinds of movies out there that can make for really compelling moviegoing experiences, and it saddens me a little that many people aren't really going to have that available to them.
 

Lewd Beholder

Member
RPGnet Member
Validated User
That sounds about as expected after what went down with the Mouse Guard movie.

But the X-mans are back with Marvel![/sarcasm]

edit: also, Stuber was a flop?!? I mean I *guess* because it was at my local theatre for literally two weeks. I didn’t get the time to see it. >.<

Pity

Stuper was awesome! :)
 

Siphonaptera

up to no good
Validated User
I love the MCU and Star Wars as much as the next guy, but there are a lot of others kinds of movies out there that can make for really compelling moviegoing experiences, and it saddens me a little that many people aren't really going to have that available to them.
I miss going to cheap showings to see whatever was available but that isn't really an option anymore plus the experience on my home TV is often comparable in quality without the inconvenience of driving to the theater and putting up with other movie goers. Blockbusters tend to make the large format more enjoyable and the crowds are better, so those are what I end up seeing so while I am part of the problem I also miss the same kind of experience.

I do wonder of scaling ticket price on demand instead of every movie being the same price would be an option. It probably wouldn't fit the studio/theater split of tickets but I think I would go see something for $5 that is currently a wait for redbox/streaming decision now.
 

(un)reason

Making the Legend
Validated User
Although I wonder about comparisons to similar situations from prior eras such as the collapse of the road show musical, since Disney's increasing hold on the market might portend scenarios in which they can't properly fail because consumers have few to no alternatives or else that fail causes cascading disaster in the Hollywood film industry.
If it does, there'll be plenty to replace it. While the number of massive blockbusters may be shrinking and staying in cinemas longer, the number of indie films these days has increased by a few orders of magnitude even compared to 10 years ago, as good quality equipment and effects have decreased in cost by similar orders of magnitude. Someone new'll end up on top, and there won't be any shortage of new films and TV to watch, even if the type goes through dramatic changes.
 

That Other Guy

Registered User
Validated User
If it does, there'll be plenty to replace it. While the number of massive blockbusters may be shrinking and staying in cinemas longer, the number of indie films these days has increased by a few orders of magnitude even compared to 10 years ago, as good quality equipment and effects have decreased in cost by similar orders of magnitude. Someone new'll end up on top, and there won't be any shortage of new films and TV to watch, even if the type goes through dramatic changes.
And it's not like this sort of thing hasn't happened before - there have been a couple of periods when blockbusters have swelled up to massive propotions in terms of cost, collapsed the blockbuster market and then caused it to reduce back to smaller projects, which now have the advantage of effects work that what even 10 years ago needed a huge team to do can be done with a much smaller team.
 
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