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Do you ever feel bad using a guide/wiki/whatever even though it's silly?

Fae

radiance of the moon
Validated User
#21
so, okay

It seems that unlike most people here, I do dislike using guides for some types of games/objectives, namely, single-player challenges that I feel I should be able to clear on my own. (Often this works out to "avoid guides until I beat the game, then go back with a guide to find hidden things I missed".) I've learned that sometimes I will feel bad if I break that guideline, so generally, I don't.

Now, along with that: I've accepted that sometimes I just won't finish games. I'm fine with that. I've played so many, after all, and there are plenty I love that don't really have end states so much as they have ever increasing challenges. If there's a story I'm interested in, sure, I'll use guides or do whatever else I need to finish, but otherwise, whatever.

This is a bit of a tangent, but honestly, the idea that every part of a game should be accessible to everybody has grown strange to me over the years. I'd rather have games with mystery and weird hidden corners and such - I like feeling like there might be something more tucked just out of sight. And I really love when I play a game, fumble through it, and then go look up how other people played it and discover than I happened upon some weird idiosyncratic style yet made it through anyway.
 

Schleiermacher

Registered User
Validated User
#22
I don't like to use guides, not because I don't feel "good enough" if I do, but because they really ruin the fun for me. Instead of going through the game and making my own decisions I'm just following a recipe. Then what's the point?

That said, I don't really care about the "find all the Koroks" kind of sidequests or achievements, so I would only try to do something like that as long as it managed to stay engaging. If I hit a brick wall and I wasn't really motivated to continue trying things I would just move on to something else.

Edit: I do often look up things like weapon stats and the effects of various leveling options, because I want to make informed choices.
 

Pieta

Very custom
Validated User
#23
This is exactly what I'm talking about.
I guess we all have our own hangups. (-:

So yeah, I'm not feeling bad about reading up on a game or looking up solutions. In fact, those often prevent me from feeling bad, because I hate feeling like a chump because I trusted the game when it told me option X is good for something when it's not, or crashed again and again against a boss that can't be defeated that way at all (thanks, Gears of War 1), or whatever. The site beforeiplay.com is a must.

On the other hand, lowering a difficulty setting (even though they're totally arbitrary and often not that well balanced)? That hurts.
 

Silvercat Moonpaw

Quadruped Transhuman
Validated User
#24
So yeah, I'm not feeling bad about reading up on a game or looking up solutions. In fact, those often prevent me from feeling bad, because I hate feeling like a chump because I trusted the game when it told me option X is good for something when it's not, or crashed again and again against a boss that can't be defeated that way at all (thanks, Gears of War 1), or whatever.
I'd probably feel less bad about this issue if I actually played any of the big, complex games whose wikis I look over for a version of "fun". Maybe then I'd view using a guide as a normal thing.
The site beforeiplay.com is a must.
I must remember to check that out.
On the other hand, lowering a difficulty setting (even though they're totally arbitrary and often not that well balanced)? That hurts.
Consulting a guide can feel like lowering a difficulty setting, in case that helps anyone imagine my situation.
 

yukamichi

Unregistered User
Validated User
#26
All the time.
I strongly enjoy the sense of exploration that I get from many games, and learning things for yourself (that is to say, only through the mechanisms the game itself presents for understanding it) is a huge part of that.
Learning something about a game outside of that experiential path often leads to a sense of dissatisfaction. I keep doing it anyway, and I keep end up regretting it. It's a big struggle between "pure" experience versus "optimal" experience (both are important in how we judge a game, I think), and I don't think it's an easy one to balance as a player if you care about both.

What I do often feel guilty about, though, is when I win a hard fight only through the use of consumables, especially if it looks like I could have won without them if I played a little bit better. Even though I know it's silly.
Ahaha, I know this feeling all too well. Playing games with hyper-limited inventory, where the design is clearly, implicitly telling you to burn through consumables, did a lot to help cure me of it (Princess Crown specifically).
 

Crinos

Be inspired!
Validated User
#27
For another example, I bought the Megaman legacy collection volume 1 on the Switch recently. This game comes with a rewind feature, which you can use to press a button and rewind the level in order to redo a tough area in case you say, miss a jump, or take too much damage in a fight, or use up your weapon by mistake in a fight.

With this item, playing Megaman 1, I just cleared Gutsman's stage for the first time. Ever. I have never beaten that level before, I couldn't because I could never get past that part at the beginning with the platforms that drop you on the frayed wires. Its probably the hardest section in any megaman game aside from the Quickman Lasers, and unlike there you don't have the option of using the flash stopper to bypass it.

I've had trouble with Megaman 1 for years, and actively avoided playing because of that specific level, and today thanks to the rewind feature I finally beat it. You think I feel bad I essentially cheated? No, because its a 1 player game and there are no consequences to cheating when its just yourself.
 

Grumpygoat

Registered User
Validated User
#28
Yes, and specifically with Breath of the Wild recently. The game's about exploration! Go out, climb that mountain, swim that lake, fly through that valley! Except...I couldn't figure out how the hell to get the shrine key in Kakariko Village. Turns out, I needed to talk to this one specific person at this one specific time - and I think in their damn house of all things - to activate a quest.

Argh. I don't think I ever would have found the quest without looking it up. Nothing but stupid luck would have led me to it, because it was so very specific, in such a way that it wouldn't happen organically during play. With no hints. I just knew it was there because I couldn't take the shrine key yet.

I hate crap like that. But I still felt bad about looking up a guide because it seemed against the idea of the game.
 

Pieta

Very custom
Validated User
#29
I must remember to check that out.
I feel they're not as active as they used to be, but it's basically a wiki where people put the most basic things they wished they knew when they started with a game. A bit of hit and miss, but I've definitely came to appreciate the advice.

Consulting a guide can feel like lowering a difficulty setting, in case that helps anyone imagine my situation.
I feel you. Either can feel like giving up.

Ahaha, I know this feeling all too well. Playing games with hyper-limited inventory, where the design is clearly, implicitly telling you to burn through consumables, did a lot to help cure me of it (Princess Crown specifically).
In those, I can get really stressed about saving the entire stock as long as possible. I'm hopeless. (-;
 

Isator Levie

Registered User
Validated User
#30
I prefer not to excepting cases for where it might be something particularly obtuse. I might feel bad if I think that I'm going for it first in a manner that denotes laziness, but if it's a case where I feel as though I've reasonably exhausted all of my own resources I can find it preferable to missing out on something entirely, and I can feed a bit of ego with any sense of "needing" a guide for only a minority of content.

I probably shouldn't though; having gotten some guides first is what created interest in and a desire to play games such as Ocarina of Time or Skies of Arcadia Legends at all. I might have really missed out without them.
 
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