• Don't link to the video of the Christchurch shooting, or repost links to the shooter's manifesto.
  • The EU is getting to ready to pass a directive widely known as "Article 13", which will flip copyright requirements on their head in the EU. Where before the law of the land has largely been 47 U.S.C. § 230, which does not hold sites like forums responsible for what their users upload, as long as they respond to take-down requests, now sites would have to proactively monitor and OK every single thing published to their site. There's a long lead-up to the disaster that's likely to follow: EU states would have to turn this directive into law, and even afterward smaller sites would have three years in which they didn't have to put out the millions of dollars required to design such filters. But the long-term result is that the EU is likely to be cut off from a lot of sites on the internet, because the requirements are frankly untenable. If you're in the EU and would like to protest, you can visit https://saveyourinternet.eu/act/. (The EU is also voting on a very problematic link-tax directive that has already failed spectacularly in Spain, for which see The Eff's Discussion, and it's worth protesting too, but it's Article 13 that will permanently balkanize the internet into the EU and the rest of the world.)

Do you ever feel bad using a guide/wiki/whatever even though it's silly?

Silvercat Moonpaw

Quadruped Transhuman
Validated User
#31
Yes, and specifically with Breath of the Wild recently. The game's about exploration! Go out, climb that mountain, swim that lake, fly through that valley! Except...I couldn't figure out how the hell to get the shrine key in Kakariko Village. Turns out, I needed to talk to this one specific person at this one specific time - and I think in their damn house of all things - to activate a quest.
I might have actually done that, too, and just forgot I did.
 

Tyrmatfrage

Registered User
Validated User
#32
I don’t like reading guides beforehand— I only look things up when I get stuck, and only the part where I’m stuck and avoid looking at the part I haven’t played yet. However, am I the only who enjoys reading guides after I’ve finished playing the game? It’s just fun for me to find out about all the stuff that I missed.
 

Trilobite

This space intentionally left blank.
Validated User
#33
I've had to use guides when I get stuck on Lego games. Compared to that ignominy, you have nothing to feel ashamed about.
Lego games all have several incredibly obtuse sections, so I wouldn't feel bad about that. (If nothing else, sometimes you need to look at a guide for them just to reassure yourself that what you're doing is correct, like after you try and fail a jump a dozen or more times.)
 

Leonaru

Taxidermic Owlbear
Validated User
#34
I don’t like reading guides beforehand— I only look things up when I get stuck, and only the part where I’m stuck and avoid looking at the part I haven’t played yet. However, am I the only who enjoys reading guides after I’ve finished playing the game? It’s just fun for me to find out about all the stuff that I missed.
I agree with that. It's like New Game+. If I used it immediately (with someone else's save game), it would probably be boring, but after I have beaten the game, it's like an extra reward.
 

Knaight

Registered User
Validated User
#35
I mostly avoid them, but I'l look at a guide when I get stuck. Occasionally this gets a result to the effect of "yeah, I should totally have thought of that", but if it's closer to "that's some nonsense" then I don't feel bad at all. A lot of this is genre - I've only rarely looked at guides, but I played an adventure game recently and ended up using them more heavily to deal with some of the more obtuse puzzles, for which I didn't feel bad at all.
 

Random Goblin

Esquire
Validated User
#36
Sometimes yeah but then I remember I'm 40 and the alternative to using a walkthrough is giving up, which I have no problem doing (again, I'm a grown up and its 2019 and I can just, play a different game). There's no way I'm going to devote the time, attention and brainpower to a videogame that it would take me to plumb all its secrets "honestly."
 

Dewirix

Registered User
Validated User
#38
I think it really depends on the type of game. I played the Dark Souls series without a guide, because figuring things out for yourself is half the fun. The tension that arises from not knowing where the next bonfire and what horrors lie around the next corner is part of the game's appeal for me.

On the other hand, I leaned heavily on the wiki when I started playing Kerbal Space Program. If you can figure out how to arrange an orbital rendezvous without recourse to outside advice then you should probably go to work for NASA.
 

LatinaBunny

Overprotective Older Sis
Validated User
#39
Never. If I get stuck or don’t understand something, I look it up. I also buy a few game guides for big games like Skyrim and such because I want to make sure I don’t get lost or make some wrong decisions, etc.

My gaming time is very limited nowadays, and I tend to get lost a lot (bad spatial memory?), so I don’t feel guilty checking a guide or a wikia once in a while.

I try not to “cheat” in order to avoid most spoilers and experience most things blind and fresh and to challenged myself a little, but when I occasionally do, I don’t feel guilty about doing it.

I just don’t have the time or patience with going back and reloading a save if I used up an important resource or replaying the game again if I made a terrible story decisions, etc.

I actually want to finish some games and make much more progress in some of them sometime in my lifetime, lol.
 

Shade the Lost

Registered User
Validated User
#40
I look at a guide after I start getting the feeling I'm not good enough.
Quoting this for truth. Also, though, that guides often exacerbate that feeling of not being good enough. There's usually just so many "wait, are you fucking serious?" moments in guides that I tend to be left feeling completely incompetent.
 
Top Bottom