Does "the lost mine of phandelver" need a specific map?

BamiPangGang

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Yes, but it helps if you have spares (encourage the players to bring some).
Okay, thanks.

So, here's what i'll buy:

-The starter set
-The bundle of maps (https://prints.mikeschley.com/p856083253) for 10 bucks
-Maybe some more dice

Will that work with the lost mine of Phandelver? I don't really know how walking works. I've seen that on the character sheet, with speed it says for example: "30 feet". Does that mean thirty of those little blocks on the map?

I'm really new to D&D, so if anyone knows something i should watch out for when buying/playing the starter set, please let me know!
 

vitus979

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General piece of advice to the original poster: If you're posting to one of the general forums about a specific game/tv show/movie/book/etc..., you might want to include what you're referring to in the Subject line so people know what game you're asking about at a glance. So a title might be

[D&D 5e] Does "the lost mine of phandelver" need a specific map?
 

DocShoveller

both a doctor and a fox
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Okay, thanks.

So, here's what i'll buy:

-The starter set
-The bundle of maps (https://prints.mikeschley.com/p856083253) for 10 bucks
-Maybe some more dice

Will that work with the lost mine of Phandelver? I don't really know how walking works. I've seen that on the character sheet, with speed it says for example: "30 feet". Does that mean thirty of those little blocks on the map?

I'm really new to D&D, so if anyone knows something i should watch out for when buying/playing the starter set, please let me know!
The map should have the scale on it. The default is 1 square = 5 feet.
 

Zeea

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Okay, thanks.

So, here's what i'll buy:

-The starter set
-The bundle of maps (https://prints.mikeschley.com/p856083253) for 10 bucks
-Maybe some more dice

Will that work with the lost mine of Phandelver? I don't really know how walking works. I've seen that on the character sheet, with speed it says for example: "30 feet". Does that mean thirty of those little blocks on the map?

I'm really new to D&D, so if anyone knows something i should watch out for when buying/playing the starter set, please let me know!
That's more than enough. The book in the starter set walks you through things, and there's a lot of information online and people who will answer questions. You don't actually _need_ extra dice or the map bundle, but they could help out. The maps are in the Starter Set book itself in smaller form. I can sorta walk you through how it'll work in play.

On the maps in the Starter Set book, each sqaure represents 5 feet.

In D&D, there's two ways to do movement. You can either use a big map with inch-sized squares and figurines (or paper markers, or coins, or whatever) to keep track of exactly where everyone is like you would in Legend of Drizzt, or you can play what's called "theater of the mind" where you don't have figures or a board and you just sorta mentally keep track of where everyone is and describe things.

You can play either way in D&D 5e, but "theater of the mind" is actually the default, so you don't need big maps or miniatures. (In D&D 3e and 4e, there was more focus on exact movement and miniatures.)

Anyway, during a fight, movement works like this depending on how you're running the game:

Miniatures and Big Map: If you have a big blown up poster map with one-inch squares and it matches the dungeon, use that. If you have a different map but it's kinda similar to the dungeon, you can use that or part of that instead. Or you can get map tiles and put them together to represent the dungeon or the room they're in, or even draw a big inch grid map on some pieces of paper.

Start with the player figures/tokens on squares at the entrance of the room they just entered (unless there's a reason they'd be a ways in already). Start with monster figures/tokens roughly wherever the book says they'll be. 5e doesn't tell you exactly where (unlike 4e, which showed you exactly which squares to put them on), so just estimate based on the description or whatever.

Characters can move their speed each round (or more if they Dash). Each square represents five feet. So, a normal character with speed 30 feet can move six squares on her turn, and she can attack or take another action at any point during that movement.

Theater of the Mind: The Dungeon Master will describe the room roughly to the players and then tell them where they are and roughly how far away the monsters are. So, if I were GMing and the characters went into Room 3 in the first Starter Set dungeon, I'd read the description of the room out loud, then say, "Okay, the wolves are about twenty feet away from the front of the party." And then the fighter's player might say, "I move up close and swing my sword" and the mage's player might say "I walk back a ways, until I'm about thirty feet away, and cast a magic missile." You don't worry too much about exactly what the room is shaped like or exactly where everyone is. It works pretty well unless you have a really, really complicated situation.

Characters can still move their listed speed. You can just glance at the map in the book to describe things if they're looking for cover or trying to figure out how long it'd take to get all the way back to the start of the dungeon or whatever. But you don't have to measure exact distances; generally, if something is uncertain, just go with whatever favors the heroes.
 

vitus979

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There is also a kind of middle ground between the two. I usually use Theater of the Mind, but if there is a LOT of stuff happening and it's hard to keep it all in my head, I simply take out a piece of paper and casually draw major room elements, then use something like dice or spare coins to represent monsters and characters. This allows people to more easily see what the general situation is without dealing with the exacting nature that the miniatures and battle map have.
 

baakyocalder

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Welcome to the forums.

For any tabletop RPG, I recommend the following:

Dice--one full set per participant. The D&D starter set comes with one set, so one for each other player is needed. Most players who are serious pick up dice, or if they are serious and short on cash, dice are a nice gift to welcome them to your group. There are so many dice out there that you can go crazy collecting them, but you can use pretty plain dice. Some people use electronic dierollers. . .

Miniatures--While you can play an RPG totally in your own head and verbally, for significant encounters in the game, miniatures help everyone know what is where. Even coins with a piece of paper with a character name written on them and taped to the coin work, but there's something to be said about having a figure that represents your character. Most game miniatures are about 28 mm in scale, which is that 1 inch is five feet square. Cardstock, metal or plastic, go with what works.

Maps--You can either buy commercial maps or make copies of the maps from prepublished adventures (used to be called modules) or draw your own. For drawing your own, you can use graph paper or whiteboards or gaming mats to draw them on. Whiteboards are pretty easy with the correct markers but gaming mats can roll up or fold up.

Rulebooks--There should be one copy of the rules for the person running the game (Gamemaster, Dungeonmaster or whatever system term is for the person running the show) and at least one copy of the rules for those who have player characters. Optimally, each player has a copy of the basic rules and any rules appropriate to their character.

This forum has a lot of helpful people, so I recommend posting in the appropriate area for your questions. You will get lots of good advice because many of us have already made those mistakes in our gaming experiences or know people who have.
 

Zeea

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Good advice, except I'd disagree about rulebooks. You can use the Starter Set rulebook or a single set of the core books and pass them around when needed as long as you have players who aren't all taking forever to look up what their spells do or whatever. Some players will want to buy the books if they like to make characters at home or understand the game better, but it's not absolutely necessary for a starting group and it's probably good to wait and see if you're all enjoying the hobby before really spending a lot on books and accessories.

You can also get by with only one set of dice, but it's admittedly a little faster if you have extra.
 

vitus979

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If it's a situation of spells, couldn't you have the player print them out from the publicly available SRD or have a tablet for looking that stuff up? That way you don't have the casters hogging the rulebooks.

This idea doesn't work so well if you get into the game and people start using expansion content, but it should work relatively well for people just using the base set.
 

baakyocalder

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Good advice, except I'd disagree about rulebooks. You can use the Starter Set rulebook or a single set of the core books and pass them around when needed as long as you have players who aren't all taking forever to look up what their spells do or whatever. Some players will want to buy the books if they like to make characters at home or understand the game better, but it's not absolutely necessary for a starting group and it's probably good to wait and see if you're all enjoying the hobby before really spending a lot on books and accessories.

You can also get by with only one set of dice, but it's admittedly a little faster if you have extra.
If it's a situation of spells, couldn't you have the player print them out from the publicly available SRD or have a tablet for looking that stuff up? That way you don't have the casters hogging the rulebooks.

This idea doesn't work so well if you get into the game and people start using expansion content, but it should work relatively well for people just using the base set.
Good points. I'm a serious gamer, so one of the ways I tell if someone is serious is if they get the game rules they need in front of them. If you're all new and there are free resources like a System Reference Document (SRD), a prepared player will have those printed out or go online to grab them.

If you have a couple of books at the table, then things speed up. I helped with a HackMaster event called Roll-N-Run where you made a character in an hour using the main book and possibly other books. If we had a book for each person and two people who knew the game, new players could make a decent character in an hour if they were focused.

For spells, you can use the SRD or spell cards to have the information at hand. Spellcaster players who are prepared will have notes or summaries of their spells.

New players usually need more handouts than experienced players, because one of the things most people who are trying to master a complex subject and have the information at hand do is make notes and cheat sheets. So, notepaper and something to write with or some kind of electronic device for notetaking is helpful to players.

Take your time going over rules and when reading adventures written by others. It's very easy to make a mistake that ruins everyone's fun. On the other hand, since we are not computers and RPGs are infinite, everyone will make mistakes and have differences of interpretation. Don't sweat the small ones and if there are large ones, if everyone is adult about it, the game can go on.
 
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