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Does "the lost mine of phandelver" need a specific map?

Zeea

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#21
Also, the Starter Set has premade character sheets with most of the things relevant to the character explained, so you won't really have to spend much time on making characters.
 

baakyocalder

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#22
Yes, D&D 5e starter set plus some player help let me use prior gaming experience and run a game out of the box at a Meetup when we were short GMs.

I use pregens with good explanatory notes and some roleplaying clues for game demos. If you're new, I can't expect you to master a complex system the first time you sit down to play. Even if you've played other games, there's a learning curve for every game.

I'm still learning D&D 5e, as I've played so irregularly my character is only 3rd level.
 
#23
First of all, thanks everyone to reply with these very, very helpful explanations. I know a lot more about dnd then i did before.

So, the theatre of mind has been proposed to me. And, while i get the concept, me and my friends have never ever done anything remotely close to a tabletop RPG. So to make it more comfortable, i'll buy the maps. Then i can just use the 1 square = 5 feet rule.
For the mini's, i'll improvise. Maybe i'll ask a friend, maybe i'll use tokens. We'll see.

Also, someone recommended a rulebook. But i saw like a starters rule set pdf online. Can't i use that?

At last, i have one more question (for now xD). How much freedom does LMOP offer?
For example, does the DM decide when and where a monster appears? Does the DM decide if the party finds loot? And how does it play? Does it give you a direction and it says that the party encounter something, and that the DM should decide what? Stuff like that.

Because this is all really knew to me. And i appreciate all the amazing support, but some i couldn't understand. They were talking about spell-rules and complicated monsters. I haven't played dnd, ever. So i don't know if magic is common and if it is complex. So when the situation arrives, i'll check that free pdf of the rules, then consult that one link someone posted. As always if anyone has some tips of things that i should watch out for, please post it.

Big thanks for all the replies tho. I'll quote a few that were very helpful.
Yes, D&D 5e starter set plus some player help let me use prior gaming experience and run a game out of the box at a Meetup when we were short GMs.

I use pregens with good explanatory notes and some roleplaying clues for game demos. If you're new, I can't expect you to master a complex system the first time you sit down to play. Even if you've played other games, there's a learning curve for every game.

I'm still learning D&D 5e, as I've played so irregularly my character is only 3
There is also a kind of middle ground between the two. I usually use Theater of the Mind, but if there is a LOT of stuff happening and it's hard to keep it all in my head, I simply take out a piece of paper and casually draw major room elements, then use something like dice or spare coins to represent monsters and characters. This allows people to more easily see what the general situation is without dealing with the exacting nature that the miniatures and battle map have.
 

Zeea

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#24
If you're coming in from board games, then it sounds like using the maps is a good call.

The free rule set online should be plenty. Books mostly just give you more classes and monsters to use, sorta like expansions in board games.

LMOP's book generally tells you where monsters will be, what loot they'll have, and how to run the adventure. You're free to modify it as you see fit, though. The first time you play, it's easiest to stick mostly to what the book suggests. Most of the time, published adventures like LMOP will make most of the decisions for you ahead of time, whereas when you're making up your own stuff, you'll make those decisions.

The rules in the Starter Set aren't very complicated, and they explain things like magic and whatnot. Mostly, magic comes up a lot if one of the players chooses a wizard or cleric as their character, but it's explained on the character sheet and isn't too complicated.
 
#25
If you're coming in from board games, then it sounds like using the maps is a good call.

The free rule set online should be plenty. Books mostly just give you more classes and monsters to use, sorta like expansions in board games.

LMOP's book generally tells you where monsters will be, what loot they'll have, and how to run the adventure. You're free to modify it as you see fit, though. The first time you play, it's easiest to stick mostly to what the book suggests. Most of the time, published adventures like LMOP will make most of the decisions for you ahead of time, whereas when you're making up your own stuff, you'll make those decisions.

The rules in the Starter Set aren't very complicated, and they explain things like magic and whatnot. Mostly, magic comes up a lot if one of the players chooses a wizard or cleric as their character, but it's explained on the character sheet and isn't too complicated.
Alright, thank you very much for the help. I now know enough to host my game. Big thanks
 

vitus979

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#26
If you have any other questions, feel free to ask either in this thread, or start a new thread in the D20 forum.
 

Knaight

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#27
Coming back to movement, remember that if you're not in combat you don't really need to break out either the turn structure or the miniatures. The core gameplay loop D&D uses is that the DM describes a situation, the players have their characters take actions in the setting fiction, the DM describes how the situation changes, repeat. Phandelver shows you the basic situation (physical layout, who is where, etc.), and provides some aid for descriptions. The actions taken in D&D tend to be particularly heavy on moving around and killing stuff, but it can be much more than that.

I'd recommend taking a look at an actual play here, or playing one session in an open format of some sort (Adventurer's League, Pathfinder Society, whatever). Seeing how any more conventional RPG runs, not necessarily even D&D, can be really helpful here.
 

drl2

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#28
Well, doesn't the starter box come with dice?
Yes, but only one set. With 2-3 players I don't feel comfortable unless there are at least 50 dice on the table. :)

(Seriously, though, having to hand the dice around and re-roll the same die over and over again - e.g. for damage rolls - seriously breaks up the flow of the game.)
 

vitus979

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#29
Plus, nearly every game shop I've ever been to has a couple boxes full of random Chessex dice that you can pick from. You can usually get dice pretty cheap that way. Alternately IIRC someone told me there are Ebay sellers who sell dice by the pound.
 

Crimson Carcharodon

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#30
There's also Amazon. You can buy five or six sets of dice, each with a small bag, for around $15. In fact, that's what I bought several of my players for Christmas this year.
 
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