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[Elite Dangerous] Transmissions From A New Commander

TrapperQ

Spiker (proof on request)
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Your ship now has two cockpit modes. Discovery and combat. Your discovery scanner only works in one of these modes. Everyone has a discovery scanner built in these days, it doesn't take a slot anymore.

So you enter a system and honk as usual.

Previously, this would reveal all the objects in the system using the Advanced Discovery Scanner, nowadays you immediately discover all the major stars and also reveal 'signal sources', which includes all planets and other stellar bodies, any notable stellar features such as clouds, and if you're near inhabited space any stations or megaships and possibly a bunch of random encounter signals. You are given a count of the stellar bodies.

You will automatically resolve any signal sources that are close to you, or any that you fly towards. Otherwise you have to decelerate the ship to minimum supercruise speed and switch to a scanner screen. The scanner screen has two sections; a bar at the bottom with blips marking each discovered signal, and a main upper screen which is basically a 360° telescope to look for the planet making the signal. The row with the signal blips cluster stellar bodies together by type, so gas giants are off to the far right, water worlds are to the near right, HMCWs are on the mid left and so on. The more of that type of body, the more blips you get in that area, so in theory you can honk the system, slow down, switch to the scanner, see a bunch of signal blips that indicate a cluster of ice worlds, tut unhappily and power up the engines to jump to the next system. Or you might see a signal blip in the waterworld range and stick around to map some more.

Anyway, these blips remain unexplored until you use the scanner screen to do a 360° search of the system for random fuzzy blobs. Each blob is an unexplored stellar body and has a matching blip in the bar below. You tune a slider on the bar with the signal blips until you find the blip that matches the blob (are you with me so far). Then you zoom in on the blob and it becomes 'explored' which means you get a pretty close-up of the planet in question and you can finally see it on the bloody system map. Once you've matched all the blips to the blobs the system becomes 100% explored.

This process will also mention in passing if the planet you discovered has surface features such as geological vents or settlements.

So what you've now done is the equivalent of the old method of honking the system and flying up to the planet and scanning it, but you can now do it without all the laborious flying up to each and every body of the system. You'll get the credit for discovering the world if it wasn't already.

But you're not done yet.

You can also now map the surface of a planet with your Detailed Surface Scanner for bonus exploration cash. If you're first to map the surface of a planet you get a separate 'mapped by' credit, which results in bonus bonus exploration cash. Mapping involves flying up to each and every body in the system in a manner identical to the way I just pretended you didn't have to do any more five sentences ago. Except now you fire probes at the planet's surface. You have to map 100% of the surface to get the credit and that means using multiple probes. There's an easy to learn skill in good placement of probes. It's mildly amusing at first.

Do a google search of exploration values. You'll find a table that lists four values for each body;
What it's worth to explore a previously explored world,
What its worth to explore a new world,
What it's worth to explore and map a previously explored world and
What it's worth to explore and map a new world.

The last one pays the big bucks. There's also an efficiency bonus for mapping a world with fewer than the recommended amount of drones.

Compared to the old system it has good and bad points.
Bad: It slows down travel as honking alone doesn't tell you what's in the system, you have to honk, slow down and check your scanner.
Good: You can explore the whole system without travelling to every planet as long as you don't care about mapping the planet as well.
 
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Randall

Registered User
Validated User
Just bought the game in a offer, is downloading right now. I have almost 0 idea about what to expect other than ships in space (and I like this no-hype no-expectations feeling), but..what to do? is there some multiplayer coop?
 

TrapperQ

Spiker (proof on request)
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Just bought the game in a offer, is downloading right now. I have almost 0 idea about what to expect other than ships in space (and I like this no-hype no-expectations feeling), but..what to do? is there some multiplayer coop?
Multiplayer can consist of a group of players organising their ships into 'wings' where they can do missions together, or just buzz about together for mutual entertainment and defence. They can do this without winging up, but the wing function allows them to keep track of each other and share rewards/bounties etc.

You can also jump into someone else's ship as a co-pilot and help them shoot stuff.

Multiplayer is limited. They only just introduced squadrons, what other games call guilds, and there's no sharing cash or ship parts. You can share cargo, but you both have to log into the game and literally dump the cargo from one ship to be picked up by another.
 

empulsive

40-something POC Nerd (he/him)
Validated User
Yeah, I never go into Open. Never have, never will. People suck, and I have no interest in tying my enjoyment of a game to their not being awful, because, well... *shrug*
 

Knockwood

Trying to figure it out.
Validated User
Yeah... Randall Randall , it is technically multi-player, but you really want to stick to solo play for a little while until you git gud, so to speak.

The thing about Elite is that it's very much a simulation. You start out with a starter ship and a little money, and your "job" is to go out and make a living. You don't get a lot of help in-game. The flight model is as realistic as you can get, and you don't get any help with landing, docking, or any of that. (Though once you get a little cash to spare you can buy a docking computer that does station landings for you.)

There's not much in the way of a story or an overarching plot, at least not that affects you in game.

But the graphics are amazing, and once you start using your mad skillz to bring in loads of credits and making your ship kick-ass, then you really see the game's appeal.
 

TrapperQ

Spiker (proof on request)
RPGnet Member
Validated User
w/r/t playing with humans in a nonganksome environment, any opinions on the Moebius group?
Join Mobius. Mobius is awesome. That's where I play normally. (I'm playing on Fleetcom right now for DW2). You never get any hassle and the other players are always friendly. I generally only run into other players at busy spaceports, where they're usually too busy looking at station facilities screens to see chat, or community bounty hunting events (where it's considered polite to wing up so you're not poaching bounties from each other).

It adds an extra layer of insurance too. If you get ganked in Mobius, Fleetcom or other PvE group, don't go past the rebuy screen. Instead, send a support ticket to Frontier and they'll probably restore your ship. You'd obviously report the ganker to the Mobius team to get them kicked from the private group.
 

Zippy

Buggy Coder
Validated User
Yeah... Randall Randall , it is technically multi-player, but you really want to stick to solo play for a little while until you git gud, so to speak.

The thing about Elite is that it's very much a simulation. You start out with a starter ship and a little money, and your "job" is to go out and make a living. You don't get a lot of help in-game. The flight model is as realistic as you can get, and you don't get any help with landing, docking, or any of that. (Though once you get a little cash to spare you can buy a docking computer that does station landings for you.)

There's not much in the way of a story or an overarching plot, at least not that affects you in game.

But the graphics are amazing, and once you start using your mad skillz to bring in loads of credits and making your ship kick-ass, then you really see the game's appeal.
The new patch yesterday makes it so that new commanders start with an advanced docking computer, and gives them a new starting area that's gank proof (Dromi system) with more tutorials and easier missions to get rolling.
 

Randall

Registered User
Validated User
This PvE group/thing seems intresting, thanks.

I'm mostly a solo/slow player, and my time to game is very limited, so I'll probably be just moving the ships in the (already checked) gorgeous graphics for a while, until suddenly family leaves for a week and I find myself deep in space troubles
 
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