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Everquest I nostalgia

Afterburner

Remarkably expressive bandages
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I remember fighting stupid snakes and gnolls at the gates of Qeynos...



I remember hunting mammoths with bow and haphazard kiting techniques, and feeling proud whenever I brought one down in those snowy hills.



I remember that crossing Highpass Hold was a terrifying experience.




I remember being afraid of falling in the Hole whilst venturing out of Paineel.



I remember giants, or maybe cyclops, attacking the boat as we crossed the Ocean of Tears.



I remember marvelling at how lifelike and immersive the dwarven city hidden behind the Velious waterfall was.



I remember grinding Crystal Caverns. Those geonids and stalag terrors and crystalline spiders were mine mine mine MINNNEEE ! :)




I remember very bitter, hard solo fights to scrap by some experience, money and the very occasional drop. Often in very odd, little-known and hard-to-reach places, as I kept soloing with a class not optimised for it. I remember all the research to find those places, the maps, the recon work, the necessary stealth, surveying loot tables for ordinary monsters.




I remember my guildies within the Silent Minority. Ambro, Skeg, Ash, Nuwar, Kity, Bulveii, Oozie, Valmir, Myrth, Lathandre, Siffle, Jender, Syssta... a weird collage from most European countries (and some Americans with unusual hours) playing off-hours on a US servers, and that ended up challenging the Plane of Time. A band of brothers with a great sense of community and relaxed attitude.
 
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Joey McGuffin

Disciple of Mazdak
What was awesome about EQ was that exploring was a challenge. You'd say, "man, I'd really like to get to X" and set off, and getting there was an EXPERIENCE. You dared dangerous and sometimes uncharted lands, you met people on the boats, all speaking different (in-game) languages, you found places you didn't know existed, and it took LONG.I don't think there has been any game since that prized exploration and, well, adventuring the way EQ did. I mean, did anyone actually do the quests in EQ? because I mostly remember farming monsters to sell their stuff to high-level crafters and randomly exploring the world.
 

Naxuul

Emo hair power!
Validated User
My main memory of Everquest was being, as far as I could tell, the only female Troll on my server. And becoming well known as a good Shaman to group with almost entirely because I was so recognizable.

Oh, I also remember running my Erudite Paladin around Guk and getting tons of free loot from people because they thought it was cool that I used Froglok's Paladin love so. I even scouted things out for people at times.

-Naxuul
 

Jigglypuff

Vet of the Psychic wars
Validated User
What was awesome about EQ was that exploring was a challenge. You'd say, "man, I'd really like to get to X" and set off, and getting there was an EXPERIENCE. You dared dangerous and sometimes uncharted lands, you met people on the boats, all speaking different (in-game) languages, you found places you didn't know existed, and it took LONG.I don't think there has been any game since that prized exploration and, well, adventuring the way EQ did. I mean, did anyone actually do the quests in EQ? because I mostly remember farming monsters to sell their stuff to high-level crafters and randomly exploring the world.
There were some good quests. They mainly came with later expansions. The one I remember most was The Spirit Wracked cord. I worked so hard to get that. Every time, I mean every time we had a raid in Chardok they'd call me to recover corpses since I was ally with them.

Exploring was one of the best parts. I'm not sure on scale wise but I still remember EQ zones being quite large. The Karanas in particular were quite big. Ill Omen, Skyfire, Sebilis, and Overthere were also big in my mind. I don't know how those zones stack up to today's MMO's in terms of size.

I never liked the boats. Maybe it was because 90% of my characters were iksar and it was such a pain to travel on them. The Nexus spires were a godsend for Iksar.
 

Naxuul

Emo hair power!
Validated User
Exploring was one of the best parts. I'm not sure on scale wise but I still remember EQ zones being quite large. The Karanas in particular were quite big. Ill Omen, Skyfire, Sebilis, and Overthere were also big in my mind. I don't know how those zones stack up to today's MMO's in terms of size.
The Karanas and the Overthere were bigger than any other MMO zone I can think of, but they were also filled with far more whitespace(Both the Karanas and the Overthere were flat plains. Largely uninhabited, featureless flat plains with few landmarks) than would ever be considered acceptable now. Ill Omen, Skyfire and Sebilis would be pretty typical for MMOs today I think.

-Naxuul
 

Goodsport

Adventurer
Validated User
I liked it. Thank you.
You're welcome. I'm glad I could help. :)

Not only is the article interesting, but so are the comments - one in particular (#8) stated that EQ wasn't initially designed with leveling primarily in mind, but was instead designed to be a roleplaying soapbox... that much of what emerged was as much accident as design.

Is that true? :confused:


-G
 

Naxuul

Emo hair power!
Validated User
You're welcome. I'm glad I could help. :)

Not only is the article interesting, but so are the comments - one in particular (#8) stated that EQ wasn't initially designed with leveling primarily in mind, but was instead designed to be a roleplaying soapbox... that much of what emerged was as much accident as design.

Is that true? :confused:


-G
UO, EQ and Asheron's Call were all designed before there was any idea what a MMO was or what people wanted out of them. So they made sandboxes loosely organized by levels or skills or monster types or themes. EQ though quickly recognized what people wanted, considering as soon as Ruins of Kunark came out it had gone into a much more recognizable zone level format with areas built with easy leveling or soloing in mind.

This can also be seen in the classes. The disparity between casting and non-casting classes was /massive/ in the original game and the difference between a pet summoned by Necromancer/Magician and a Warrior was shockingly small for most of the game(And sometimes the pet would pull ahead in health and armor.:D). The caster classes got a massive hodge podge of spells with mind only to theme, not style. So Enchanters were considered totally crap until people figured out crowd control at which point they were massively overpowered. Shamans sucked until people figuring out buffing and debuffing, then they were massively overpowered. Druids had the second best heals, nukes and could fight at almost Warrior level and that's without form shifting removing casting(Take that WoW druid!). Wizards were so overfocused on useless AE damage that what at first was thought of as the best magical class, because it was so strong, became derided as a agro grabbing, mana hogging deathtrap. There was no real rhyme or reason to the class builds, but tons of flavor.

-Naxuul
 

Ghostwise

Mort aux cons
Validated User
The Karanas and the Overthere were bigger than any other MMO zone I can think of, but they were also filled with far more whitespace(Both the Karanas and the Overthere were flat plains. Largely uninhabited, featureless flat plains with few landmarks) than would ever be considered acceptable now. Ill Omen, Skyfire and Sebilis would be pretty typical for MMOs today I think.
What struck me when seeing some of the other folks' "I remember" and Afterburner's screenshots is how well I remember the places, and the emotional connection. Even if I no longer remember the name of the zones, I can still close my eyes and see what's around each screenshot, and how you get there, and what the dangers are.


Normally I would assume that it was just the circumstances in my life when I was playing EQ1, but this sense of 'place' seems shared among many old-timers. Though as AB's shots attest, it was certainly not because of the quality of the graphics. :)


There was a sense of... sharing these places, which has never quite existed in my WoW experience. There was a wealth of shared experience, and often hardship and achievement - with perhaps wonder - that made, say, Kurn's Tower, Butcherblock or the Overthere feel more immersive and present than they should have been.
 

Naxuul

Emo hair power!
Validated User
Well, I would argue that EQ's approach of going for a RP sandbox created a much more immersive world. I can instantly remember the different architectural styles of the various races, I can remember the different speech patterns and attitudes. I can remember especially how thematically different they made different areas.

-Naxuul
 

Jigglypuff

Vet of the Psychic wars
Validated User
Well, I would argue that EQ's approach of going for a RP sandbox created a much more immersive world. I can instantly remember the different architectural styles of the various races, I can remember the different speech patterns and attitudes. I can remember especially how thematically different they made different areas.

-Naxuul
Playing eq for the first time got me interested in the lore for the game too. None of which I cared about in any game I played since..

For instance the first time I stepped into the field of bone I wanted to know why the reservoir was dry and why there were bones all around. This lead me to search out those books that dropped that no one wanted so I could read the stories. I read all I could find and some of the store were actually pretty neat. The story of what happened at Grieg's End being one of the best.

I would seek out all types of lore such as why Trakannon was the only poison dragon. Other good stories included Veksar, Tower of Frozen Shadow, and the stories behind the Sword of Rile (helm too).

*EDIT*
Ohh yeah for to give props to the story of Zlandicar one which I used in a D&D game and the players loved.
 
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