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hsienfan

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It has the benefit of not having the same fail states as Ex1e, (which wasn't quite as outright broken as the second edition) so it is an improvement, admittedly.
As someone not system-inclined, I'd be interested to know what "fail state" means and how it manifests in classic WoD versus Exalted 1e versus this product. (Or just one of them, if it's a lengthy matter to describe.)
 

Cowmandan

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You know, I really don't like the mechanics for exalted 3e. This is great stuff though. Why didn't they keep it this simple and clear, it would have been brilliant.
It's really just a fun thing about Exalts mugging the WoD and taking its money.

The system is not very good at modeling Exalt vs. Exalt conflict, given that it's near impossible to even hit or injure another Exalt until they finally run out of Essence.
 

LordofArcana

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As someone not system-inclined, I'd be interested to know what "fail state" means and how it manifests in classic WoD versus Exalted 1e versus this product. (Or just one of them, if it's a lengthy matter to describe.)
Imagine two of these Exalts going up against each other. They will each have some pretty high defenses, but it is still possible for them to hit each other.

Now imagine that their defenses are twice as high but rolled. It is certainly possible for someone rolling 20 dice against your 10 to lose but it isn't very likely. Both sides can raise their numbers, but the basic ratio of 2:1 remains. Thus combat devolves into an endless stalemate where you hope the turn you roll well is the one they roll poorly. Nothing happens for forever and then one of you randomly loses. This is 1e combat.

2e was arguably an improvement. The basic system was that you would spend 3-4 points each attack to defend or spend 10(?) points to defend against any number of attacks. You could do flashy stuff but that costs your "stay alive" points and doesn't really get you anything. So both combatants switch off smacking each other until one of them falls over. At least you know that the fight will eventually end, I guess. The exception being against an unpatched Twilight, those guys were nuts and could last forever against most foes.
 

JetstreamGW

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Imagine two of these Exalts going up against each other. They will each have some pretty high defenses, but it is still possible for them to hit each other.

Now imagine that their defenses are twice as high but rolled. It is certainly possible for someone rolling 20 dice against your 10 to lose but it isn't very likely. Both sides can raise their numbers, but the basic ratio of 2:1 remains. Thus combat devolves into an endless stalemate where you hope the turn you roll well is the one they roll poorly. Nothing happens for forever and then one of you randomly loses. This is 1e combat.

2e was arguably an improvement. The basic system was that you would spend 3-4 points each attack to defend or spend 10(?) points to defend against any number of attacks. You could do flashy stuff but that costs your "stay alive" points and doesn't really get you anything. So both combatants switch off smacking each other until one of them falls over. At least you know that the fight will eventually end, I guess. The exception being against an unpatched Twilight, those guys were nuts and could last forever against most foes.
M'boy, 2e rocket tag. How many Seven Shadow Evasions can you stunt!?
 

vitus979

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You know, I really don't like the mechanics for exalted 3e. This is great stuff though. Why didn't they keep it this simple and clear, it would have been brilliant.
The design philosophy of Exalted has always been to eschew the "5 point Discipline" model and instead base powers on the core mystical ability (Essence in this case) + something else, usually either attribute or skill. I would have been WAY more surprised if Charms in 3e were now devolved to a "5 point Discipline" model.
 

Ghosthead

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Standard Exalted is much more about balancing conflict between Exalted, tactical combat (some would say too much!) and pacing development among Exalted, so gating Charms behind ratings makes sense, and 3e's Essence as a gating factor outside player control does too.

This is more about "Smash everything!!!" so you kind of don't want / need to gate things too much.
 

Fabius Maximus

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Yeah. This is walking up to the vampire, telling everyone how there is only darkness, nothing but hopelessness and then showing him: HOW TO PUNCH THE UNIVERSE INTO RIGHTEOUSNESS!
Or, if you're an abyssal, how to do his job even better.

I have to admit, I like the origin for hte alchemicals, especially auto-kun's freakout.

"I have slept untold aeons, the very stones that held up ancient creation have worn away to dust, now I shall... beep-beep? Wait, that's my exalted det--OH COME ON!
 

Zemyla

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Honestly, if you don't like the Exalted fluff, you could just use the system plus the Martial Arts supplement as a more balanced-within-itself replacement for the 90s WoD version of Street Fighter.

EDIT: Bison would seriously work as an Infernal, at least personality-wise.
 
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TavelGorge

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We havent seen the game really be about smashing things and breaking the world. In 5 sessions theres only been a single death (accidental firefight with a vampire that went bad for the vampire). Characters in the game are all high school students who live in LA in the 80's. Its a great breath of new life in the old World of Darkness.

Lots of character interaction, grappling with morality, and trying to dismantle a Toreador vampire conspiracy (used the conspiracy pyramid from Nights Black Agents)
 
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