Fantasy Flight Games "Netrunner" is dead

AliasiSudonomo

Trying to be a bird
Validated User
Each of us is entitled to react in our own way to this news, and to different products on the market. Let's go with that, yes?
Or you could... just not come in to tell us we're all wrong for liking what we like.

And honestly, the Android setting isn't classic cyberpunk. It's informed by real-life advancements (after all, technically speaking we live in a cyberpunk setting, albeit one where the governments managed a better response to globalized megacorps... but an awful lot of the classic tropes are reality, now, and the ones that aren't weren't ever really practical) and Netrunner especially was interesting in that they took pains to look at the world outside the US/European sphere.
 

Critias

Social Justice Galliard
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I'm aware of all those things, and apologise if this is offending your attachment to those games.
And yet you keep on talking, comparing people's beloved games to picking flesh from old bones, saying they're not interesting to you, calling them simply nostalgia marketing, etc, etc.

I mean, you're maybe not quite gravedancing, but you're coming awfully close to it. If you want your apology to sound more sincere, maybe you could stop digging.
 

Owesome

Social Justice Warmonger
Validated User
Netrunner was always That Game that I kept meaning to get.

If I pick up the core set by it's lonesome will I have a good time with it, or are there expansions that are absolutely essential?
 

Asklepios

Registered User
Validated User
And yet you keep on talking, comparing people's beloved games to picking flesh from old bones, saying they're not interesting to you, calling them simply nostalgia marketing, etc, etc.

I mean, you're maybe not quite gravedancing, but you're coming awfully close to it. If you want your apology to sound more sincere, maybe you could stop digging.
I think I'll leave the thread, then. Clearly yourself and a few others want to treat this thread with the implicit assumption that the end of a gameline should be treated with the sort of deference and respectful hushed tones that I'd normally associate with the death of a person, rather than being open to a discussion about how gamelines ending can be a good thing.

The word "gravedancing" really suggests to me that we're viewing this event through entirely different mindsets, so it's probably best if I leave you all to your grief.

Condolences on your loss and all that.
 

Senex

Gunboat Diplomat
Validated User
Netrunner was always That Game that I kept meaning to get.

If I pick up the core set by it's lonesome will I have a good time with it, or are there expansions that are absolutely essential?
I have some stuff besides the (original) core set, but have actually only ever used the core set. Not having the time to do tournaments, I've mostly played with friends and family as a diversion, same way I might play a boardgame. If you're happy with that level, the core set alone will do the job for you. If you're looking to get competitive, you'll probably need other things.
 

AliasiSudonomo

Trying to be a bird
Validated User
Netrunner was always That Game that I kept meaning to get.

If I pick up the core set by it's lonesome will I have a good time with it, or are there expansions that are absolutely essential?
The core set (especially the revised) is sufficient but expansions can really open up what you can do. Of all of them, the ones to look out for especially are all of the "big box" expansions (all named X and Y, like Honor and Profit, or Data and Destiny - although Terminal Directive also kind of counts) - while formerly it was due to tournament legality, even now they focus on two specific factions so it's good to pick up the one(s) for the factions you like. Creation and Control and Data and Destiny in particular are nice as C&C has several neutral runner cards that will greatly help your cash flow in game, and D&D focuses on NBN and instead of a normal runner faction, instead introduces three 'mini factions' - runners who are a faction unto themselves, but given a vastly increased influence allowance to compensate. They all run in unique ways which is a fun variation to a normal runner, although of the three Sunny can play the most like a "generic" runner - she has a full breaker suite in-faction and really just needs a steady income.

I think I'll leave the thread, then. Clearly yourself and a few others want to treat this thread with the implicit assumption that the end of a gameline should be treated with the sort of deference and respectful hushed tones that I'd normally associate with the death of a person, rather than being open to a discussion about how gamelines ending can be a good thing.
No... look, the way you wanted to discuss 'a gameline ending being a good thing' was "While I mildly enjoyed this game..."

That comes across as "well, I'm glad that game you weenies liked is dead, so they can spend some time on a game I would like better". That's rude by any measure.

It's also a silly sentiment, since last I checked, we have at least three collectible card games that have persisted for multiple decades,* and it's not like we talk about conventional board games "dying" and no longer being worthwhile to play unless they've honestly been superseded in design. Chess doesn't stop being chess because it's old, and the entire point of LCG rotation was to forestall the "too expensive to get in" problem. That's all stuff I've said previously in this thread, but perhaps it didn't sink in last time.

* Magic, the Pokemon CCG, and Yu-gi-oh are all over or nearly over twenty years old, and still active. Legend of the Five Rings nearly made it, but there we can discuss genuine problems AEG had at the end of original flavor L5R's life and flaws in the game mechanics (they weren't ever all that brilliant). CCGs and LCGs die because designing a good one is hard and involves continually designing a good game over a period of time, not because the format is inherently prone to a short lifespan.
 

Uthred

Nature's critical miss
Validated User
So I'm looking at the news of the line ending as being something which is an inevitability of the LCG model, and the clearing of space for new product to come along.
The line ending has exactly nothing to do with "the inevitability of the LCG model", it has to do with losing a licence which has absolutely nothing to do with the model. In fact the LCG "model" doesnt appear to have any "inevitable end" that I can see. The LCG's that have ended seem to have been due to losing licences (Netrunner, Conquest, Call of Cthulhu) or to make room for second editions (Game of Thrones). The only one that ended "naturally" was Warhammer:Invasion (aruagbly to make way for Conquest). I also dont think subsequent LCG's have been innovative more than iterative but that feels like a pointless tangent.
 

triorph

Winging it
Validated User
Netrunner was always That Game that I kept meaning to get.

If I pick up the core set by it's lonesome will I have a good time with it, or are there expansions that are absolutely essential?
No joke I live in your hometown and there's a small but dedicated crew of regulars who play the game and would be happy to give you some demo games.
 
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